Instructables
Picture of Converting Cordless To Lithium Li-Po
As time moves we find that our drill don't cut it any more as now there are all of these new powerful cordless drills with lithium but the price of one of them cost about an arm or leg so what do you do?

Convert them to lithium,

Motor technology has been the same since 20 years ago and it's still the same in all new drills "DC Brushed Motors"

Up on opening my "Old" drill and having a look at my motor my motor looked very new and the brushes ware far from worn if not still would go strong for many years to come.

On the other end the battery's ware totally on the end of its life.
 
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Step 1: Opening Your Battery Pack

Picture of Opening Your Battery Pack
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When you open your battery pack your going to find sets of sub c battery's which are most Likely cheap cells depending on your make of your drill since we only care about the enclosure you can throw away the cells or keep them for a different project doesn't matter what we need to know is the inside dimensions as that will tell us how big the battery can be.

Order a smaller battery then the dimension as it will allow you to move the battery around.

Step 2: Soldering The Power Connector

Picture of Soldering The Power Connector
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Once you have found the best location for your battery you have to solder the power connector to your original battery connector

Always do one lead at a time solder the positive wire then heat stink the connector and then the negative wire and then heat shrink it.

Also helps to add a deans connector to make charging very simple.

Step 3: Closing The Battery Pack

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At this stage you can close every thing up and drill a hole for your balancing connector and call it a day.



And if your like me then you want a battery pack with no loose wires hanging out then the next step is for you.
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Costarus9 months ago

These batteries provide a small current. And small capacity. I used 12 PCs 18650 scheme 4 x 3. Could 14-15 Volts and capacity of about 4-5 Amp*hours. Homemade box.

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henal (author) 1 year ago
Nice mod mastelios
mastelios1 year ago
Nice!Well done!done mine a long time ago,with some 3s lipos I had from my rc flying days, I have learned to be careful around lipos so I did not add any low voltage circuit.I just check it with a checker now and then.I have found that with the lipo it goes strong for way more than it used to because of the different discharge curve of the batteries.Also mine was supposed to be 14.4v nicd but I used a 3s setup.In practice there was no power loss.Here as a couple of photos,not as good as yours but I needed something fast at the time plus the drill itself was not worth it(a cheap Chinese one)
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henal (author) 1 year ago
Thank you for all your comments iv added a step for charging the battery pack, hope it clears a lot of negative comments.
BigAndRed1 year ago
if the Li-ion pack is same voltage as old Ni-Cad then use the same old charger dock.
it will have all the correct circuits to charge with over voltage protection built in.
this has worked on a 14.4V Ryobi drill with 4x 3.7 V Li-ion 18650 cells, works better than before with lots more working time.
5x 3.7V = 18.5v for bigger battery pack.
This is a bad idea. A very, VERY bad idea. The charging profiles are not the same, and just because it works does not mean it will work for very long. You cannot drive a Ford Tarus like a NASCAR and expect it to last.

I heartily recommend against this, and that you read up on how a NiCad battery charge profile is nothing like a LiPo/Li-Ion charge profile.
OK, well i think the dock can still be used if the circuit inside is replaced with
Li charging circuit. easier than putting extra plugs in?
Seems like a lot more work to do all that, than to put a DIN connector on the side of it and use that to charge. You are already taking the battery pack apart, so how much more effort would it be to put that DIN connector on there? You could even go with a MiniDIN/PS2 as the charging voltages are low enough for those pins. Might be a bit tricky to solder, but hey. What is life without a challenge?
tstevens-11 year ago
Also, lipos have a threshold. If you discharge the batteries beyond this point, they won't recharge. So if you run the drill down to where it quits, you've likely ruined your lipos.
For what it is worth, I have the Craftsman C-3 Series tools and switched from NICADS to LITHIUM - Sears provides the battery packs so re-building is not the issue. But, your comment does not comport with my experience (over 18 months now) witht the lithium batteries and chargers that Sears provides. I am using the tools that came with NICADS and the Sears lithium batteries. I regularly use the tools unitl it 'quits.' Then, pop it in the charger, then use it again. BTW They have a charge guide built into the Sears litium battery unit - you prss a button and it glows, Green, Yellow or Red to indicate the state of charge.
you are using Lithium Ion batteries, which are the defacto standard for power tools. they put out 3.3volts per cell, versus the 3.7 volts of LiPo. Li-Ions are also composed of a more stable cell structure and do not heat up and have a danger of fire when run below 3.2-3.4 volts.
the reason LiPo batteries are more popular in radio control is that they have a higher amp draw than Li-Ion.
Im using Li-ion 18650 3.7V cells, have never found any at 3.3V
D'oh! you're right! I was confusing the voltage rating between Li-Ion and Li-Fe.. The rest of what I said still stands, but I apologize for the voltage mix-up
I didnt know about Li-Fe batteries, will have to have a look at them.
I build small solar power systems and use Li-ion to store power as smaller, lighter and more efficient than Lead-acid.
That is probably true for the Sears pack. I would bet most people who are rebuilding these packs do not have any kind of charge protection on the lipos they put in their pack. So, we both are right!
The batteries you are using have a charge controller. They track the cells state of charge, and if you are about to dip below the safe point, they shut the pack down. Typical, older RC batteries won't include the controller. If you abuse them beyond the safe point, you kill them.
Can you tell more about the lithium batteries? Where did you get them? How much did they cost? Thanks
look on ebay, there is many different types of Li-ion cells to pick from.
nthomas121 year ago
this is great, ive wanted to try this for ever, glad to see it done so i know it works, and i dont have to worry about the risk!! Thanks
henal (author) 1 year ago
Yes I'm using a balanced charger ATM which I'll take full blame for not providing a step for the charging section will update it by tomorrow.

Currently I'm trying to work on a circuit which uses a light to turn on when the battery is low or some thing which MUST not take any power.

This is my first guide on this website and I'm doing it through my phone's app which is not as easy as doing it on the computer.
makya henal1 year ago
here you go. My apologies for being harsh earlier. After seeing what happened to Mike's Hobby Shop in Dallas last year,I'd hate to see that happen to someones home. here is a link to a low voltage alarm for a couple of bucks:
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__41185__On_Board_Lipoly_Low_Voltage_Alarm_2s_3s_USA_warehouse_.html?strSearch=lipo%20alarm
mtoddh1 year ago
Very nice. Unfortunately, I just threw out 2 old drills that I had been hanging onto in my shop for several years.

On the other hand, these chargers and packs are really expensive. I lot more than I paid for any my cordless drills.
makya mtoddh1 year ago
they don't have to be.
you can buy a charger for less than $15 if you don't mind charging in 2 hours. $20 if you want to charge in an hour.
batteries are about $8-10 a piece.
ardnaz1 year ago
Very good idea!
question: Where can I buy the lithium cells, and, more importantly, how do I get a charger. (or build one) since I assume that you need a special charger for lithium batteries.
makya ardnaz1 year ago
many of the Radio control car/plane suppliers carry them. You will also need a low voltage alarm for each battery pack to prevent the dangers of LiPo batteries catching on fire. the alarm starts beeping to let you know when the cell voltage drops and needs to be recharged.

you can try valuehobby, they are in illinois, and shipping is pretty cheap. look at their batteries and chargers. I got my charger from them for $20
rjnerd1 year ago
So how do I find a comparable sized Li cell to my existing NiCd pack? I know they are sub C, but they aren't marked for capacity. How many MaH is a typical sub C?. I assume that I will try to fill the pack, to get max capacity, matching voltage...
Cheap sub C nicads are often 1300mAH
Wingloader1 year ago
I knew I was keeping my dead drill for something.this is one of the most useful Instructables I have seen yet. Now I just need to find out where to get the din connector without spending $12 for shipping :-)
ricoj1 year ago
for the people that are not into RC; always use a dedicated lipo charger!

I'd consider adding a simple lipo saver, there's plenty around, with a light or a buzzer that'll warn you if the voltage drops too much.
makya1 year ago
BAD IDEA!

you need to warn people about LiPo fires from running the batteries below 3.4 volts per cell, and the danger of fires from doing so. You also did not mention that you have to use a LiPo specific charger. We almost had a track burn down in Dallas last year from a Lipo fire, and it is actually a requirement at r/c car racetracks to use a fireproof container to store and charge your battery packs in to prevent a Lipo pack fire from spreading.

I'm sorry this is not more constructive, but this is dangerous advice
Gilo1 year ago
I never charge my lipo batteries indoors or I put them inside some fireproof vessels like a pyrex bowl or a metal container. Lipos can heat up and burn if charged wrongly or if they get knocked hard (as in dropping your drill from a high spot) . I keep an eye on my lipos when charging.
On my Sears C-3 se, there are three connectors in the battery pack/tool. Does anyone know why?
the third terminal is often a temperature sensor.
rickharris1 year ago
To get the best life from the battery you should get a balanced charger.

The voltage of the old battery pack and the new need to be close as well or you drill will run slower/faster (may burn out)
Yes, voltage needs to be correct - and (I would assume) correct amperage is as important.
Michael_oz1 year ago
"solder the positive wire then heat stink the connector" what's the best way to stink it? LOL
mrgiant1 year ago
hello

I like the idea of it
please advise on cost effective purchasing of the batteries
super cheap from hobbyking.. under $10
steve0001 year ago
I am in the process of a similar thing

For me I added a female XT60 plug to the internal connection and cut a hole in the back of the battery pack. I put some foam in to secure the battery.
This allows me to remove the battery for charging and make it hot swappable, runs flat, just pull battery and put in a new one. If you are doing constant work having 3-4 batteries will give you almost continuous work time.

If you have one of those multi chargers, when you take a break for lunch shove them all on charge at once.

Also helps to have one of those voltage meters that beep when low, get a adjustable one and adjust it to around 3.7v as the standards alarm at 3.3v, too low for my liking.
Remag12341 year ago
Nice Mod BUT, you can buy an 18v. 1/2" Hammer Drill for $54.99 add an extra battery for $14.99 without any hassle @ Harbor Freight. For $70 it will do the job for most DIY's, if it breaks just throw it away and get another. It doesn't get much better than that.
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