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This instructable is about a time experiment. Don't criticize me if you don't think this works because I'm just 13 and it just works when I do this experiment. The results are usually never the same because it's weird like that. I also theorized that time in relation to the position of the sun changes weather time for the testing watch slows down or speeds up.
 

Step 1: Materials

These are the things you will need for the time experiment.

2- stop watches calibrated the same with the strings on them
2- working and accurate hands
1- time to do this (like 2 mins)
1- open space 

Step 2: Doing the Experiment

Now to do this you have to be very accurate. First, start both of the stop watches at the SAME TIME . Then set one of the stop watches on a table and spin the other one really fast by using the string to spin it around. The picture shows you how to spin the watch around in-case you are that dumb. Spin the stop watch for around one minute to get good results.

Step 3: Stoping the Watch

When you stop the watch, you have to stop the watches at the SAME TIME . If you don't start/stop the watches at the same time, then your results will be messed up. So now that you stopped them, you should notice that the watch in motion has either gone back through time or forward in time. Whether it goes back/forward through time depends on time in relation to the position of the sun.

Step 4: Time Theories

Einstein's theory of time travel states that the slower you go, the faster time around you goes; also that the faster you go, the slower time around you goes; if you go at the speed of light, then time around you stops; and if you go past the speed of light, then time around you goes backwards. But what I observed, like I keep saying "time in relation to the sun", means at which angle the sun is in the sky like morning, noon, you get the point; so before 12:00 pm time outside the watch slows down, but after 12:00 pm time outside the watch speeds up. I'm not sure how true my theory is, but that's what I've noticed.
<p>Are you too dumb to specify clockwise, counterclockwise?</p>
<p>I've done this before. Instead of spinning, I threw the stopwatch high into the sky, and when it came back, it was slower than the stationary one</p>
<p>That's cool!!!</p>
<p>;D</p>
<p>the biggest problem is the lack of wanting to know more,some kid with 2 stopwatches thinks he can stop them at the SAME TIME :)) if you would have bothered to google half the time that you spent spinning watches,we wouldn't be here now would we :)</p>
Have you taken into account that you may have one or more broken watches? <br>While speed and gravity do effect time any human powered effort would be completely unreadable by any normal instrument. Another hypothesis; a wizard did it.
It's probably just the centrifugal force on the components on the watch that cause the time change.
.&nbsp; The speed of your stopwatch* is such a small fraction of the speed of light that you will not be able to detect contraction with a manual stopwatch.<br> <br> <br> *Certainly less than the speed of sound or you would hear the sonic boom.<br>
https://www.instructables.com/files/orig/FZW/N8YY/GOSDJIBX/FZWN8YYGOSDJIBX.gif<br>(both Rich Editor and Add Images appear to be borked)
I think you're just losing/gaining time by not being able to start/stop the watches at exactly the same time. While that's the most likely case, it may also be that the stop watches you're using weren't meant to be operated while being spun in a circle and it effects their ability to accurately keep time.
I think you're just losing/gaining time by not being able to start/stop the watches at exactly the same time<br> We made this experiment at school maybe 6 years ago, using RC watch, so we could start/stop both at the same time. The result was that the spinning watch was going slower.<br> <br> it may also be that the stop watches you're using weren't meant to be operated while being spun in a circle and it effects their ability to accurately keep time.<br> I would tend to say that this statement is true.
I never thought that spinning the watch would kind of ruin the time system, thanks for telling me.
I don't know that it does, I'm just trying to think of possible explanations for your results.
Good work, techno guy. Make many experiments, perhaps some day your name will be on a par with the great scientists.
I don't think this will make me famous, but my theoretical reactor, the joule reactor, might make me famous.
Congratulations. The life is made from dreams; people that has not dreams, is not alive. Don't seek fame, it will not make you happy.
&quot;Before 12:00 pm time outside the watch slows down, but after 12:00 pm time outside the watch speeds up&quot;. Nice concept to think about. You are working in the tracks of Stephen Hawking. Good going Techno Guy.
Thanks artworker
you being 13 has nothing to do with people criticizing you here. ( i really wish you young folk would quit trying that tactic, if you're old enough to post an ible here, you're old enough to do science correctly. if you're not doing science correctly, then you're going to get told as such)<br> <br> this has nothing to do with relativity.

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Bio: I am a total nerd who works as a software developer, and knows a bit about computer/software technology. Plus I like space and vintage ...
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