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Step 3: Making the Insulated Backing

Cut the seams off the insulated bag to make sheets of insulated material. If the bag has layers of material that separate, glue the layers together with the fabric glue described in Step 1.

Carefully glue a layer of skin-tone cotton fabric to the outside of the insulated material, then place it aside to dry.

Once you have the measurements of a frozen ice strip, you can begin measuring and cutting. This part can be a little tricky, and you should play around to see what will work best with your materials. The insulated material will form the back of an ice pouch to hold frozen ice strips (the absorbent fabric will be the front, and the whole thing will be lined in bias tape). You want the insulated material to cover the entire back of the frozen ice strip, but having too much will be a large strip of stiff material right on the back of the neck and can hinder head movement.

I have found that what works for me is to cut the insulated material slightly larger than a frozen ice strip, but not as large as a thawed one; the rest of the space of the pouch is made by cutting extra of the absorbent material, but you will need to hold the materials together around the ice pack strips to see hoe much you will need.


A note about the insulated material:
The more holes that are poked in this material, the weaker it becomes, and it may tear. For this reason, don't use pins on the insulated material. If machine-sewing in later steps, always use a zig-zag stitch and don't back-tack.
<p>The sodium acetate crystals would need to be enclosed in waterproof material. It's used in potting mix and the cooling bandannas worn outdoors. A tablespoon of crystals will gel up to a quart of water. We froze them in a Bundt pan to use when working on the roof.</p>
<p>Great ideas. I used to use ice cubes wrapped in a tea towel and tied around my neck before I found the neck bands with crystals that you can buy, but I just didn't like the look of them if I was going out somewhere (and they always got my shirts wet).</p><p>I have some different waterproof materials around here and plenty of seam sealer, so I think I'll play around with different ways to get the crystals into a nice looking scarf without leaving the scarf and my shirt drenched. I'll post an addendum if I'm able to come up with anything.</p>
<p>Great ideas. I used to use ice cubes wrapped in a tea towel and tied around my neck before I found the neck bands with crystals that you can buy, but I just didn't like the look of them if I was going out somewhere (and they always got my shirts wet).</p><p>I have some different waterproof materials around here and plenty of seam sealer, so I think I'll play around with different ways to get the crystals into a nice looking scarf without leaving the scarf and my shirt drenched. I'll post an addendum if I'm able to come up with anything.</p>
Yay! I have been wearing non-sewn versions of these, but these instructions will help me make some good permanent additions. (I have MS too). Is it Fall yet? :)
<p>I'm always looking for ways to stay cool outdoors (and indoors in Winter when everyone has the heat cranked up as high as it will go and I'm walking around in a t-shirt, burning up). I'm counting down the days to Fall, too :-)</p>
Bravo.
Instead of using ice<br /> You could use water absorbing crystals like these<br /> <a href="http://www.neckcoolersrus.com/" rel="nofollow">http://www.neckcoolersrus.com/</a><br /> The crystals are also available from ebay
Have you used one of these before?&nbsp;I'm curious about how crystal soaked in water would be for not getting my clothes wet. It's something to play around with - couldn't hurt. Thanks for the tip!<br />

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