Introduction: Cornhole: Built in Electronic Score Board

Built in cornhole score boards using up down counters and stomp box switches.

Parts List:

Tools Needed:

  • Router (for recessing back of button panel to accept switches, the inset for the displays and the tinted plexi to cover them, and I made grooves in the legs for the wires to sit in) -
  • Drill -
  • Screwdrivers -
  • Adjustable Wrench -
  • Soldering Iron -
  • Wire Snip and Wire Stripper (optional, makes life easier) -
  • Dremel or Rotary Tool (optional, but you'll need something semi-precise to cut the up/down counter circuit-board into two pieces)

Step 1: Step 1: the DIsplays/Counters

I used two of the up/down counter units linked in the parts list, one for each team in the game. The specific unit linked above is made so that you can cut a portion of the circuit-board off to separate the 7-segment 4 digit display from the rest of the circuit-board and reconnect the two with wires. I did this so that I could mount the electronics under the cornhole board and run wires along the legs and down to the panel/cross-member where the displays and buttons are mounted.

  1. cut the circuit board into two, separating the display from the rest of the circuitry,
  2. Recess some space in the cross-member to fit the displays,
  3. Route out an inset in front of the displays to accept some tinted plexi
  4. Make sure everything fit in their places.

Step 2: Step 2: Buttons/Switches

  1. locate and drilling holes for each of the buttons.
  2. Because the mounting depth of the switches is limited, route out some space on the back of the cross member to allow the buttons to poke through far enough.
  3. Dry fit each button to make sure they fit.

Step 3: Step 3: Wiring

Look at the PDF instruction sheet for the up/down counter to confirm all wiring diagrams.

  1. Connect the displays to their corresponding circuit boards (the ones you cut apart) using 3 feet of LAN cable for each unit, use the soldering iron to secure your connections.
  2. Connect two of the four momentary switches to each unit as the up down switches, use the double pole double throw (DPDT) switch for the reset button (DPDT means that it can act on two different circuits at once), wiring one side of the switch to the reset on one unit, and the other side of the switch to the other unit. I used the remaining 3 feet of LAN cable to wire all the switches.
  3. Wire the Panel mount DC Power Jack to each of the up/down counter units, this power jack will supply power to both units at once.

Step 4: Step 4: Testing & Install

  1. Connect your charged battery pack to the DC Power Jack, turn it on.
  2. Test each button to make sure it performs the function you think it should. Hold the reset button down for 5 or 6 seconds to make sure it resets
  3. Mount the buttons/switches and displays to the cross-member, being careful not to put too much stress on your soldered connections (LAN cable uses solid wire, so they don't flex very nicely)
  4. Run your cables along the legs, securing them as you like. I routed a groove to embed the cables, then used 1/4" project board to place a panel over the cables to hide them.
  5. Mount the electronics under the cornhole board along the back edge. You'll want to use the little electronics spaces to hold the circuit-boards up off of the wood.
  6. Mount a wood strip/board/wall to box in the circuit boards underneath the cornhole board. Drill a hole in this for the DC Power Jack and mount it.
  7. Use another piece of project board as a removable access panel to cover and allow access to the electronics under the board, screw it into the wall you created in the last step to secure it.
  8. Take two pieces of velcro and screw them to the underside of the board in a cross configuration to hold the battery pack securely in place.
  9. Connect the battery pack to the electronics using a short male to male 2.1mm jack DC power cable.
  10. Turn on the battery pack and check that everything is working.
  11. Optionally, use black electrical tape to cover the first two digits (hundredths and thousandths places) on each display, b/c personally I don't plan on using numbers above two digits (counting to 21)
  12. install the black plexi over the displays, I secured mine in place by sinking a pan head screw on the left and right ends of the plexi, just next to the edge of the plexi so the pan head overlaps the edge of the glass. Be sure to pre drill this so your screw doesn't wander and mar or crack your plexi.

Comments

seamster (author)2016-05-11

Nice! This is a fantastic addition to a cornhole board.

I love the natural wood + paint finish on the top too. That looks awesome!

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