Instructables
Picture of Corpsing a Bucky

It may be early for Halloween, but if you want really nice props, you have to start Early. There are lots of ways to build a corpse / zombie prop, but I believe this is the best way to come up with a professional looking product with little or no experience or artistic ability.

 
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Step 1: Materials Needed

Picture of Materials Needed
LatexBucket.jpg

1 forth quality Bucky Skeleton (or less expensive purchased skeleton)
1 quart of liquid latex
2 pairs queen sized panty hose
1/2 pair (one piece) ankle "footy" hose
assorted craft brushes
assorted shades of brown acrylic craft paint
coarse jute rope for hair or vines (optional)

There are many, many different skeletons on the market these days. They vary greatly in quality and price! This tutorial will be using 4th quality Bucky skeletons from SkeletonStore.com, which run about $150 each. While that may sound like a lot of money, a Bucky is a very high quality, heavy, durable prop that will last pretty much forever. The Skeleton Store also sells many other quality products which might be more appropriate for the causal user.

Liquid latex can be purchased in quarts, gallons or 5 gallon buckets from MonsterMakers.com. This is mask making quality latex not intended to be used for make up applications directly to the skin.

Any brand of panty hose will do. Actually, the cheaper brands, or even (Clean!) used ones, are best for this project.

We also used coarse ropes from raveling erosion cloth from a lawn and garden shop that was being used for other decorations. Anything that you have lying about can be used for decorating.

These are all awesome.... TFS.....

Interresting process and creepy results. I would love to see as much as you have about the Weeping Widow, too. Thanks for sharing!

BeautyandBeast (author)  Dominic Bender7 months ago

Everything I have about the Widow is at

http://2bcostumes.blogspot.com/

Most of these older projects are things that we just took photos of as we made them for ourselves. At the time, we never invisioned anyone else trying to copy the process.

very cool