Introduction: Creating You Own USB Cables

In honor of the USB contest, and my own passion for making my own wherever I can, I have created what I believe is a totally unique (gasp) Instructable.  I could be wrong, of course, but a quick Google search turned up nothing for this, so I'm claiming glory lol.  All told, with picture taking, this project cost me around 30 min, and $0 because I had everything lying around that I needed.  Let's begin, and remember to vote!!!

Step 1: Items You Will Need

Straight forward, these are the items you will need to make a custom length USB cable:

A piece of Cat-5 cable, length you desire
Extra USB connectors that come with a 6-in-1 type cable (if you ever had to purchase one like me, you probably have at least a couple you have absolutely no use for)
Razor knife (careful!)
Soldering iron and solder
Shrink tubing
Wire Strippers (optional)
Basic electrical meter (not pictured)

I decided to make my own cable to 2 reasons:  1, I always make my own cables when I can (the one I bought that came with the connectors was about $15, yikes!), and 2: Cables never seem to come in the length I need.  I always want a longer or shorter than you can buy (most USB cables are 6ft long, this one I made is 10ft long).

Step 2: Harvesting the Male and Female Ends

I picked 2 of the connectors that I had absolutely no use for, couldn't even tell you what they might fit.  I carefully (to preserve the usb end) used the razor knife to remove the plastic around the connector part I didn't need.  I then use the knife tip and small pliers to peel away the metal housing for the unused connector, exposing 4 wires.  I cleaned these up as best I could, and proceeded to step 3.

Step 3: Preparing the Cat-5 Cable

Cat-5 ethernet cable is generally fairly cheap, and I like it because it comes with 8 conductors (wires) and since it's solid wires (instead of stranded), solders beautifully for whatever I need, and small enough for all my mini-electronic experiments.  We will only need 4 of the 8 wires, so to make it simple, I kept only the solid wires (blue, orange, green, brown) and removed the stripped wires, on both ends of my cable.  I then stripped about a cm of the ends, just enough to solder to.  I took a large piece of heat shrink tubing and slipped it over the body of the wire, and took a smaller heat shrink tube and quartered it, placing a 1/4 on each of my 4 colored wires, as pictured.

Step 4: Solder Time!

For the first connector, it doesn't really matter what color wire you attach to what pin of the USB cable.  We will ensure before attaching the other end that it's all right.  In retrospect, I would have used my shorter-wired usb plug on this step as it doesn't matter, but you know what they say about hindsight...  Regardless, if you are a neat solder-er, you can make all your connections, then turn the plug upside down so the smaller heat shrink covers the welds.  Heat gun/blow dry to shrink, ensuring all connections are fully insulated from each other.  You want NO chance that these wires might cross later, or your cable will be worthless.  Use electrical tape if necessary to ensure good insulation, then slide the large heat shrink over the whole mess, and heat it up to tidy everything neatly.

Step 5: Finish the Other End

Before you can finish out the other side, you have to make sure you are connecting the right wires in sequence.  To do this, I used the electrical trick called "ohming out the line".  Using a meter, set it to the Ohm (greek Omega character) setting, ideally the setting that sounds on connection.  You can test this by touching the 2 leads of your meter together.  They will either make a noise, or if that feature is not on your meter, make the needle jump or numbers go crazy, indicating a closed circuit.  I  plugged the female end of my usb cable into my already completed male end, and while holding 1 meter lead on an exposed wire from my female connector, touched each of my colored Cat-5 wires in turn until it made a noise.  I then knew these 2 should be soldered together.  So as to eliminate confusion, I went ahead and soldered each pair as I matched them so I wouldn't forget.  Once finished, I took turns touching my terminals to every possible combination of wire connections to ensure I did NOT hear the noise (each should be fully isolated, and not 'ohm out', or that would indicate a crossed wire or short somewhere, not a good thing).  Once satisfied, I completed my heat shrink tubing as I did on the original end.

Step 6: Test It Out!

To test, I plugged the male end into my computer's USB port, and a cheap flash drive into the other.  I was hoping to catch a picture of the bubble in the system tray, but the best I grabbed was the open window showing my empty drive contents.  I was slightly worried that the longer wire may cause a voltage drop (and I'm sure in very long ones it can/will), so I changed my meter from OHMs to Voltage-DC setting.  The outside pins on a USB connector supply the power (pins 1 and 4), so I touched my meter contacts to these 2 and read 5 volts.  Success!

I hope this inspires you to get creative with making things that suit your needs.  My next project will probably be to use some spare Cat-5 and a spare USB 2.0 PCI card I have to de-solder the USB ports and make my own USB Hub.  Thanks to the entire Instructables community and individuals like KipKay that inspired me to get started tinkering with things like this!  VOTE FOR Pedro ME!

Comments

author
botronics (author)2017-07-14

You can get USB connectors and shells really cheap at banggood.com. No need to chop up other stuff.

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author
Hamids (author)2016-12-27

thanks for sharing your experience , however I've tried to power up my external HDD with external 5.4 vcc power but the my built usb adapter not recognized by windows whereas my mouse work well with that , do you have any advise or hint ?is it possible somehow noise affected usb connection?following is the image of my adapter which is easily made by simple male /female usb connector

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author
KocHiW (author)Hamids2017-05-05

same here.. work on mouse but not external hdd

author
baribe68 (author)2017-01-25

I need help because I have an original iPod and my charger broke and I can't use my iPod anymore. can you help me.

author
flattery (author)2013-04-20

What about EMI and USB standard requiring shielded cable to protect from EMI?

How does this achieve that? I don't believe cat5 cable is shielded...

author
GavinV1 (author)flattery2015-11-19

Just use shielded CAT cable then...

author
ludionis (author)flattery2013-04-20

From a quick Google search, I do believe that technically speaking USB requires shielding. To be honest though, it didn't concern me for my purpose was exclusively to extend the charger cable for my PS3 controller so I could sit on the comfort of my couch when my controller ran low lol. I technically only needed the +5v and ground cables connected for my purpose, but decided to hook them all up for my instructable. You are correct, cat5 is not shielded in the least. Maybe you could cover the entire cable in aluminum foil or metal duct tape? J/K lol

author
numanair (author)ludionis2015-10-26

For a ps3 controller to charge it requires being connected to a host device. In order for it to know it is it needs the data wires.

author
DavidS78 (author)2015-05-30

Hello:I have a charging cable intended to go from a vehicle's cigarette lighter-to-mobile device. The end does not fit my mobile phone's data/power input. I've cut off the charging cable's end - there are two wires, obviously one will be positive
and the other negative/ground. Next, I've removed an end from a cable that fits my mobile phone's data/power input. However, that piece has several
wires inside.Does anyone know which two (color) leads are positive and ground? Thanks for any help.

author
ludionis (author)DavidS782015-10-22

Honestly, the safest way would be to plug the power end in and use a volt meter to test, but usually black is ground and red is positive.

author

Same here

author
allat (author)2015-05-17

author
focous (author)2015-03-27

nice, what matrial should use?

author
focous (author)2015-03-27

author
aewers (author)2013-02-09

I totally agree. Electric meters measure watt hours Volt/Ohm/Multi-meters measure different aspects of the flow of electrical energy. Awesome article though, it confirmed that Cat5 is an acceptable replacement for USB cable. I wonder how difficult it woud be to make converter/adapter ends for a cable so that it could be used as both?

author
dnx (author)2012-08-07

still have disadvantage use this..but still good..

author
phoneyfarmer (author)2011-09-11

Couple of points here.
1) While solid copper is easier to solder than stranded, stranded has much better durability for cables which are moved around, such as this cable.
2) The data conductors should consist of a *twisted* pair. This greatly improves noise rejection. The data pins on the USB connector are the center 2. You'll probably need to use the ohmmeter technique described at the end of this instructable to ID the leads. The twisted pairs on the Cat cable are ID's by the colors: the solid blue with the white/blue, solid/orange with the white/orange. The power conductors do not need to be twisted pairs.
Otherwise, nice instructable.

author
35Timmy (author)2010-09-05

i like it

author
Whiternoise (author)2010-06-07

Nice instructable :) Just a small caveat that if you're considering making USB cables for the purpose of extending existing ones, there is a maximum usable distance before the cable doesn't work. It's not an issue about attenuation or any physical problems as far as I'm aware - it's actually built into the USB specification with regards to signal delay. For a high speed device (USB2.0?) the limit is 5m. For a low speed device the limit is 3m. This isn't an issue for most people, but I've had problems when trying to tether a camera to a computer and the cables not being long enough so it can happen.

author
Sergei- (author)Whiternoise2010-06-15

Hi Had the same problem with a printer when i purchased a cable that was a 6 meter usb 2 cable, i got it because it was on special for like $2 Wouldn't recodnise the printer was plugged in so i just shortened the cable to 4m the " reverse of this instructable :) " and it works perfectly and now have a spare 2m cable ready for some ends The total distance including what ever your using or extending shouldn't be more then 5m in total length all up for usb 2 or it won't work or won't work well

author
ton2303 (author)2010-06-14

I'm afraid you'll have to review your Googling capabilities, since the original was right at your doorstep https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Extend-yout-USB-using-UTP/ Please return your self acclaimed glory-tol to the guy who originally posted this.

author
ludionis (author)ton23032010-06-14

I thank you for sharing that link. However, my googling skills work just fine, as I was unable to locate instructions for creating a usb cable, and was not searching for extending an existing cable. It may be splitting hairs, but I consider what I did as taking components and changing them into something else, where he took an existing component and modified it without changing it's function. I have similar to that instructable soldered spare cat-5 wire onto the antenna ports of a baby monitor to increase it's range, or replaced the factory speaker in an alarm clock to make it louder. I think I will keep my self acclaimed glory for the moment though. :)

author
keithisit (author)2010-06-10

Thanks for this little instructable, I work in an electronics store and get constant requests for allsorts of USB to (insert pretty much anything here) cables/adapters which as far as I know don't exist, which isn't to say they don't but if my store doesn't sell it then tough cookies. Sooo from now on when I get that incredulous look which screams 'you don't know what you're tallking about geek' I can direct them to this instructable with a smile and the suggestion they have a go at it themselves.

author
Fingers0110 (author)2010-06-07

For future reference it is called a Multimeter, MultiTester, or Volt/Ohm Meter(VOM) so you and everyone else knows what instrument you were using to measure the volts and Ohms for your project. Great Instructable by the way, I'll be using it to teach my after-school electronics/IT class at the local high school. Thanks for all the work!

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