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I recently purchased a sand blasting cabinet from Harbor Freight. I had no room in my workshop so I had no choice but to set it up outside in the workshops over hang. I live in Florida and the little critters like birds, wasps, lizards, snakes and so on like to make their homes in any place they can find. I cover the sand blaster cabinet with a tarp, but that is not enough to keep the little pest out. I do not what to stick my hand and find there is something living in the access holes. This is my solution to the problem.

Step 1: Measure and Trace

1. Start by measuring the glove access holes with a ruler, yard stick or measuring tape.

2. Next trace a circle with a compass ( I made the one shown for bigger circles) to the measurement taken on a piece of wood. I used soft pine because it is easy to work with.

Step 2: Cut and File or Sand to Size

1. I used a jig saw to cut out the circle.

2. Next sand or use a rasp to file the circle to fit in the glove access hole. The wood rasp is much easier than sanding the edges. Sand if you want to make is look good.

Step 3: Add Some Handles or Knobs.

1. Drill a hole in the center of the circle for the handle or knob screws .

2. I used some old drawer pulls I had laying around the shop to attach to the wooden circles for ease of installing and removing the cover plate.

3. You can paint, stain the wood if desired. You can also add weather stripping along the edges to prevent the wood from scratching the glove access plastic trim.

4. Folks I highly recommend the sand blasting cabinet from Harbor Freight. It is a pain to assemble, but it works extremely well. I used a 20% coupon and paid under $149.00. I would have made an instructable on how to assemble the cabinet, but I had already assembled it before this contest was posted.

<p>While our glove box is indoors and critters so far have not been a problem, we made it out of the square shaped metal hood on the back end of a John Deere combine that was in the scrap yard. that way the top and three walls were welded, (sealed) metal, the leg base we made with a metal grate to work on, and a hopper bottom to dump the sand back out. The front is metal sheet with the access door, gloves, and sight window. </p><p>But your plugs are a good, simple fix to a serious problem. thanks for the Post!</p>
<p>Hi greenwoodcreations, sounds like a heavy duty piece of equipment, nice!</p>
<p>As you are drilling a hole in the middle of your circle anyway, you could put a shaft through and attach it to a drill to file it down</p>
<p>Good Idea Robin!</p><p> Thanks</p>
Beautiful! I'm getting ready to make one out of an old 55 gallon drum and it will sit outside the shop and I never even thought about something like that despite having to battle wasps and hornets every year. Thanks.
<p>Hi gwood9, I have learned the hard way. I even had a opossum get in my motorcycle saddle bag. I did not snap the bag and it got in it. Wasps, bees and hornets are the biggest problem. i like the 55 gallon drum idea, which I could make one myself. Thanks,</p>

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Bio: Retired Air Force and Retired from my Appliance Repair Business. Love to make things. Outdoors, Boats and Motorcycle Riding
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