Instructables
Picture of Cursed Midna, Twilight Princess
midna_icon.jpg
Midna-glow.jpg
Thanks for taking the time to read my instructable, and I hope you vote for me too!

While intended as a con costume, Midna this would be great for Halloween also.  She really is kinda creepy looking.

I used reflective tape to make my glow lines - I don't have many in-progress photos because I hadn't planned on making an Instructable, but I can have a list of materials, approximate costs, and how long it took me. I can also answer any questions you might have - I am always happy to share!

This project was time consuming, but not that hard to do. It requires surface prep, storage space, hot glue and patience.

I've described the following steps as best as I can without progress shots, please ask questions if you have any!!

 
Remove these adsRemove these ads by Signing Up

Step 1: The bodysuit

-Zentai Suit from ebay
-Paint, there are some options here
-Reflective tape
-Dress form, if possible, if not, a few sheets of cardboard folded up can work
-Plastic wrap
-Heat gun

The Suit -

This was the one place I cheated. I bought a zentai suit off ebay in white. Midna is actually very pale blue - I used this statue here for some referenceshttp://: http://www.first4figures.com/component/option,com_myphp/Itemid,3/product,82/ - luckly, my friend also owns this statue and got me several very good close ups of Midna.

I dyed the suit overall a very pale shade of light blue using poly idye. This stuff can be tricky, and dying polyester usually takes a little bit of time. Read the directions carefully. RIT dyes would probably also work.

7 pots of black fabric ink - heat-setting and opaque, but not thick. If I redo the suit, I may just go with regular fabric paint, but I wanted the body suit to look dyed rather than having a thicker paint layer. I found mine at Jerry's Art-O-Rama for about $3 a pot.

300 inches of reflective bike tape in blue. I started with three packs of this -http://http://www.amazon.com/Lightweights-Reflector-Tape-Deep-100-Inch/dp/B003Z7YJI4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1381069338&sr=8-2&keywords=light+weights+tape+blue and it wasn't quite enough,, so I bought some extra sheets on ebay

The prep work for the suit involved me removing the dress form from the stand, wrapping the whole thing in plastic wrap, and then sliding the suit onto the dress form. It made it easier to figure out how to make the lines, and easier to actually paint. Let the suit dry on the dress form, and you can heat set it on the dress form as well.

Stay flow fabric gel stuff - I can't recall the exact name of it, but it's easy to find in art stores. It makes for clean lines where your black edges stop and will prevent bleeding, You paint it on first roughly where you think the edges will be, then allow to dry. It will be invisible once it dries, so you need to mark where your lines will be first, either in chalk, soft pencil or something else that will wash out later.

Once you paint your bodysuit with black, it MUST be heat set, or when you wash it, i'll just all just flow right out again. I do my heat setting with a heat gun set to low, and waving it back and forth gently. I figured out how long it would take by using a scrap bit of material from the hood of the suit, since I wasn't using it. The hood also was great for dye testing. I only wash the suit gently with a wet/damp cloth and rub it carefully. Zentai suits can come in very thin, and can damage easily.
-
I had to apply the tape with both hot glue and super glue. In the end, the best thing was a super strong spray adhesive - spray into a separate disposable dish, then apply to the underside of the tape with a q-tip. the tape is sticky, but does not set perfectly. I had to glue down a number of edges and corners after applying. Use chalk to trace where your lines will go before applying, once the tape is down, even if the edges turn up, it will not come up without damaging the suit.

Later, I added bits of worbla covered in leather and fabric to make the spikes on my arms. The collar should also have curled spikes, but I don't really have room for them

My suit cost: around $200. Same thing can be done with a $30 zentai suit and thicker, black fabric paint - or a black zentai suit and paint over in white instead - you will use less paint this way. Instead of reflective tape, simply use blue fabric paint and heat set. Chalk your lines first, if you can, it works better to do it with a friend's help - you pretty much have to be wearing the suit while applying the tape/paint because of stretchiness.

IMPORTANT NOTE: When using the heat gun, you CAN burn the lycra/spandex material of the bodysuit. If you use a heat gun to heat set/dry the paint/ink/whatever, you must use the lowest setting and be very very gentle. Do not let the gun point at any one spot for any length of time, and do not get the business end of the gun too close to the fabric - 2 inches away is plenty close enough. When it's 'done', the fabric will be hot to the touch, but not finger burning. The FIRST indication you get that you are too close/too hot, is that the fabric will visibly flatten, and then it will turn brown and burn. I tried it out on a scrap of hood to see what it would take to ruin it, and it can happen very very fast. After the test scrap, I had no problems heat setting the whole suit.

You can also use the heat gun to dry the ink/paint, and this will further help keep clean lines.

Hi there! I am thinking about making this costume for Halloween this year. I really enjoy challenging myself with hand-made Cosplay. Last year I made a Grumpy Cat costume, complete with homemade facial prostheic (pictures attached!). I am curious about a couple of things. First of all, you say you painted your catsuit on a dress form covered in plastic wrap. That is a GREAT idea. What did you do with the arms and legs, though? Do you think stuffing them with newspaper or something would work to keep the fabric stretched while it dries? Secondly, and sorry if this is too personal, but I am curious about how difficult it was to get in and out of the costume to use the restroom. I'm going to be wearing my costume all night for two nights in a row, so this is important information to know! Thanks for this wonderful, detailed entry. And great work!

1380373_10151703807732478_2097313542_n.jpg
fluffydragon (author)  sarissa.boudreau19 days ago
Thanks a bunch for the comment! your grumpy cat is awesome. I like the shape of your face mask, and the whiskers are a nice touch!

Cursed Midna has actually been one of the more forgiving costumes to use the bathroom in, EXCEPT THAT you can't wash your hands unless you get all the way out of it, which I tried to do as little as possible so I wouldn't break my reflective tape. The zipper is in the upper back, and I had to have a friend undo it for me, and re-zip me. If you don't have a friend to help, you can tie a long string to the zipper and tuck it down your back, and use it to zip and unzip yourself. If you go this route, practice a few times before going out in it and finding yourself unable to pee.

Since I used fabric ink, rather than fabric paint, I didn't bother stuffing the arms and legs too much. The ink is very thin and fluid and it actually wasn't a bad thing to paint the arms flat, since the ink just soaked into the other side of the arm. One leg and both arms are completely black, so I didn't have to trace a pattern past the torso, just slathered on the ink. If you plan on using fabric paint instead of ink, or just want to stuff them anyway, roll up a bath towel into a cone/spiral shape about your arm length, wrap those in plastic wrap (double up the wrap to save your towels) and just stuff them down the arms and legs before painting. it'd probably dry faster that way anyway. Newspaper would probably work too, but def. wrap in plastic wrap so you don't lose your valuable and expensive fabric ink into staining the newspaper or other stuffing material. A secondary reason to wrap up newspaper or other material is so that you don't accidentally stretch the sleeves in a weird way that leaves a permanent stretched out spot. If you go with a less expensive zentai suit, like I did, the stretch is eventually going to wear out. I wish I'd gotten a heavier weave one to start with.
Graceless Art3 months ago

Really cool cosplay! I'm currently making a True Form Midna, and I can tell you first hand that RIT dye does work, very well in fact. I used Evening Blue liquid dye, about a Tablespoon for fifteen minutes. (The regular is two cups for half an hour. That's how light it is!) And things are going pretty well with the cosplay. However, if I may ask, which color of Ben Nye makeup did you use for your face? That's one of the things I've been having an issue with....

fluffydragon (author)  Graceless Art3 months ago
I did a mix of white with a little blue and a bare smidge of black to make it light grey-blue. I wet a brush in a mix of final seal and water and rub the white powder with the brush until it loosens up, then swipe in some blue. It takes a little bit of work to wet three different tubs, but I only use my white for Midna, so I don't care if contaminate it a little with the blue and black. I use a quick clear primer first too from ELF, seems to make a difference. After I apply the white/blue, I have a loose yellow powder, and if I have it, a tiny bit of gold shimmer eyeshadow that I dry brush lightly under my eye(s) to make it look like they're glowing against my cheek bones. It's subtle, but it works pretty well close up.

Thanks for the comment :) Good luck with your TF Midna. I need to get mine out again for a photoshoot. I did a bunch of upgrades on my TF Midna and haven't got a decent photo to show for it yet.

Okay, thank you so much! :D

Love the cosplay! You have my vote!
fluffydragon (author)  Jran Sakarra1 year ago
Thank you so much! I appreciate it!