Introduction: Cyclone Dust Separator on the Cheap!

A cheap separator that goes with your vacuum to collect most of the debris and reduces the need to replace the bag or empty a small vacuum, although this could be used with a larger bucket to reduce cleaning even more!

The main part of this build requires this cheap plastic cyclone separator which are normally very expensive to buy but can be found on Banggood for less than £15!!: http://www.banggood.com/High-Efficiency-Cyclone-Po...

I made this because of the amount of times I found myself changing the bag in my vacuum when working with my CNC router and other tools in the workshop all day, it fills up very quickly!

https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/du6/DUST-COMMANDER-Cycl...

This is the cheapest one I could find on Amazon.co.uk and is almost twice the price of the Banggood one, for something that looks identical!!

Step 1: Things You Will Need!

This project is very simple if you have access to a CNC router but also can be accomplised easier with more common tools such as a jigsaw or a small hand router.

You will need to order the cyclone form banggood: http://www.banggood.com/High-Efficiency-Cyclone-Po...

A bucket of some sort, preferably metal and of decent size you so you don't need to empty it too often!

Some MDF wood or ply wood to make the cyclone-bucket mount.

Hose adapters fro your particular vacuum and hose you intend to use.

Step 2: CAD/CAM

I modeled a quick plate that would attach the cyclone unit to the bucket and help to create a good seal.

This model was then processed through 2d sketches into Aspire to generate some g-code for my CNC.

Although I used a CNC router here, you could equally cut the shape with a jigsaw and then sand it to finish. Alternatively, a router with a circle cutting jig could be used to achieve a higher degree of accuracy and would require less finishing.

Step 3: CNC/ Making the Connector Plate

Although I used a CNC router here, you could equally cut the shape with a jigsaw and then sand it to finish. Alternatively, a router with a circle cutting jig could be used to achieve a higher degree of accuracy and would require less finishing.

The part is quite simple and I also recommend giving it a coat of lacquer to protect the MDF.

The nice thing about MDF is not only is it cheap to use but also it can be cut very quickly on a CNC router. It took only 2 passes to get through the 15mm MDF on my Shapeoko 3 at a high feedrate!
It only required a bit of edge sanding, mainly to remove the tabs that held the piece in place during machining.

Step 4: Attach the Cyclone

This next step is simple, just attach the cyclone to the top of the connector plate. I machined a pocket whilst making the connector plate that the cyclone sat in so it would line up perfectly with the hole through the connector plate. I then drilled the holes for the bolts to hold the part down.

Adding a bit of silicone sealant under the flange of the cyclone can help increase the efficiency of the cyclone by reducing air leaks.

Step 5: Hose Adaptors

I quickly bodged together some hose adapters for the intake and vacuum side of the cyclone from some old fittings that I had lying around for my vacuum cleaner.

I mounted them using epoxy and duct tape to ensure a durable connection with a nice air tight seal.

For the hose on the cyclone I used a spare length of hose from my current vacuum and cannibalised a connector to attach to the cyclone to use as the intake hose.

Step 6: Testing!

Once it is all assembled, it is ready to be tested!

I made some dust and shavings using my CNC and electric planer and then sucked them up using the cyclone, it worked perfectly and only the really fine dust ended up inside the vacuum bag which is to be expected. The rest was caught in the separator which made it so much easier to dispose off than having to change a whole bag!

The only addition I have made since completing this project is putting a large elastic band around the rabbit on the connector plate, this helps improve the seal between the cyclone and the bucket increasing the suction a bit!

Comments

author
onederful1 (author)2017-02-07

Does the Bangood cyclone ports fit standard US shop vac hoses?

author
RonaldR (author)onederful12017-02-09

you can buy fittings if your vacuum hose does not fit , plus Banggood sell 32mm hose as well

author
Nickolae (author)onederful12017-02-09

I'm not entirely sure but they aren't an exact metric size so I assume they fit imperial sized hoses!

author
SteveP124 (author)2017-02-05

I have that same one and sucked in a plastic pail lol, are you using metal? Does that top hose go to the vacuum or the wand?

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