Step 3: Use an InkShield as print head


So, it looks like we may not be able to use the latest 1200dpi generation of inkjet printers to print anything larger than yeast cells. And we may not even be able to print yeast or even E. coli cells with the inkjet cartridge on this particular printer!

Other groups using inkjet printers typically use ancient HP printers that only do 300dpi, with nozzle sizes presumably around 80 micron or so, which should be plenty large to print human cells. For example, this group is using an HP DeskJet 500, a model that dates all the way back to 1990 - good luck still finding one of those!

Now, Parallax used to have an inkjet printer development kit available to drive a 96dpi HP 51604A cartridge, but both the cartridge and Parallax kit went out of production a few year back.

Luckily for us, Nicholas Lewis recognized the need for a DIYable inkjet platform, and started a kickstarter campaign to build Inkshield: An Open Source Inkjet Shield for Arduino. (Back in stock by March - see the comments below!) InkShield is designed around the HP C6602 inkjet cartridge, a specialty cartridge with only 12 nozzles at 96 dpi, designed to print labels on things like cabling (or... inkjet cartridges!). 96 dpi equals a dot pitch of 265 micron. As you can see in the last image above, the actual nozzles are only about 1/3 of the distance between dots, or about 85 micron - just perfect for our purposes!

The InkShield is designed to be driven from an Arduino, but does need a higher voltage than the 5V the Arduino gets when it is powered from USB. So you'll need to supply a 9-12V input via an optional power connector on the InkShield, or via the power connector on the Arduino.
<p>quick turn pcb board .12usd for 5pcs 100*100mm prototype pcb board . more information,pls contact eva liang via mail: service01@pcbgogo.com. make pcb board at http://www.pcbgogo.com/c</p>
For printing in papers we use inks , but for priniting life cells what should we use ???????
<p>other living cells</p>
Soften any 'plastic', abs with a couple drops. Mix by weight 60% lacquer thinner and 40% acetone. (You can alao combine 30 to 35% ether and 65 to 70% naphtha to make a petroleum distillate but remember it's 72% volatile!) Use a suitable eye dropper non-plastic or rubber...some plastics are safe as applicators. For really small precision jobs use a suitable syringe. Polyethylene for example should be ok to use. <br><br>(You know the drill for safely dealing with chemicals...don't be stupid! Get a little help from someone who knows what they're doing and where) (http://www.uic.edu/sph/glakes/harts1/HARTS_library/solventhazards.txt)<br>This solvent works fine for making plastic welds and all sorts of plastic repairs.<br><br>Make sure to use lacquer thinner and not just toluene. The additives help make a close solvent to weld plastic. Check VOC's before you start. No MEK required but it's ok if in the lacquer thinner. (Thin out some ABS solvent and dissolve ground abs to make a great filler. <br><br>
Sorry just fyi...I'm a hack so check everything before trying to open a cartridge. I have very advanced training in industrial fabrication but the tinkering is just a hobby that I totally get for no explained reason.<br>Keep safe.
<p>I'm absolutely amazed. This work is truly fantastic. No other words than compliments and compliments. A little question.<br>Do you think is it possible using living animal cells to build an active layer for an enzimatic bioreactor like a sintetic belly - gut?</p>
<p>Wow very cool</p>
<p>Good work with printer.</p>
<p>This is a fantastic Instructable. Now I won't have to steal live kidneys anymore.</p>
<p>kidneys and eggs yum!</p>
<p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="281" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/qXXZLoq2zFc" width="500"></iframe></p><p>The first minute explains the possibilities of BioPrinters.</p>
<p>Amazing work!!!</p>
<p>Three words: Living Litmus Paper</p>
<p>Aren't the inks in inkjet cartridges alcohol based? Wouldn't it make more sense to put rubbing alcohol to clean the cartridges rather than just plain water?</p>
<p>Wow! This is amazing. Great job. </p><p>Congratulations guys!</p>
People are selling refillable ink cartridges now, so it might be much easier (and safer) to buy a cartridge that is designed to be refilled. (Although, you'd still have to open it up &amp; remove the sponge) <br>http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=a9_asi_1?rh=i%3Aoffice-products%2Ck%3Arefillable+ink+cartridges&amp;keywords=refillable+ink+cartridges&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1443536137
<p>Awesome work..</p>
<p>it is seems to be fantastic.us it possible to get the coding for the bioprinter ? if yes plss mail me </p>
<p>This project really very cool!</p><p>Iam impressed.</p>
<p>Hi ! <br><br>Great project . is it possible to get the codes used for the project. im trying to figure out how to use inkshield for a similar project of mine and im only a beginner :)<br><br>Thanks alot !</p>
<p>How about using a cnc milling machine to cut a precision opening in the top of the ink cartridges. Then another part could be machined to fit in the opening to close it. Look at the Othermill - www.othermachine.co/othermill as a suggestion.</p>
<p>clever, i'll give this a go when they come to town!</p>
<p>hello, does anyone have a sample of the arduino code? please email me abrarnourallah@gmail.com</p>
<p>Excellent project. Must try this</p>
<p>Interesting! But I have a question. What happened to the plate of E.coli on the agar plate? Wouldn't the cells eventually die off or if given nutrients grow so that the words were obscured? Is there any way to preserve the cells besides a picture? Or is deterioration inevitable?</p>
<p>I am working on a presentation for College, does anyone know what the price is? I would also like to know what will the market for this be? Will it be distributed to hospitals or will it be able to be used in small clinics?</p>
<p>Hi Alex! I visited BioBots website! When will the BioBots be available?</p>
<p>We are working on something similar over at <a href="http://www.biobots.io/" rel="nofollow">BioBots</a>. A low cost, high resolution, 3D bioprinter that is revolutionizing the field of regenerative medicine.</p>
<p>Extremely good...!!</p>
<p>Its really good :)</p>
<p>Really good</p>
<p>Thats astounding...</p>
<p>Its magnificent :)</p>
<p>Very cool!!</p>
<p>Thats impressive</p>
<p><br>Thats impressive<br></p>
<p>Thats excellent</p>
<p><br><br>Its extremely good :)<br><br></p>
<p>Reading this Instructable gives me chills!</p>
<p><br>Thats extremely good...<br></p>
<p>Its really good :)</p>
<p><br>Very good...!!<br></p>
so awesome

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