Introduction: DIY Clay Pot Convection Heater X10 to the Extreme

Intro:
Our project aims to utilizes recyclable and reusable items found throughout a household. The function of the DIY Clay Pot Convection Heater x10 to the Extreme is to produce sufficient amounts of heat to increase the temperature of the room. The heater is an efficient and a resourceful way to heat a room without the need of a conventional heating system.

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DISCLAIMER: We are not responsible for any injuries that may occur. If you are not comfortable with any of the following steps in this process do not proceed.

PROCEED WITH EXTREME CAUTION

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Science:

According to the laws of thermodynamics hot air flows to cold air. So the basic principle behind this design is to replace the cold air in a room with warm air. The design accomplishes this by using DIY can stoves filled with Heet or isopropyl as a heat source and clay pots to capture the heat and maximize heat output. The rocks that elevate the clay pots allow for cold air to cycle through into the pots and turn into hot air. The hot air then rises and is captured by the clay pots, consequently the heat captured in the pot warms the air cycled between each of the pots and is thus emitted into the surrounding area.

Step 1: Materials:


Can Stove:

  • 8 Aluminum cans (may require more)

  • CAN A = can with holes

  • CAN B = can without holes

  • Heet (yellow bottle) or Isopropyl

  • Awl

  • Needlenose pliers

  • Exacto Knife

  • Penny

  • Lighter

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Convection heater:

  • x3 Clay Pots

  • 8 inch

  • 10 inch

  • 12 inch

  • Level Stone Surface (Large enough for the pots to rest on)

  • Tinfoil

  • Metal Tray/Sheet (Optional)

  • Recommended: Fire Extinguisher

Step 2: INSTRUCTION: CAN STOVE X CONVECTION HEATER

Finished product created on wood surface for photo purposes.
(When put into use avoid placing on any flammable surface)

Step 3: ​Can Stove:

  • Using your exacto knife cut the bottom of a can 1.00 - 1.25 inches from the bottom.

  • Label this as CAN A.

  • Caution: Edges of can are sharp, sand down to prevent cuts.

Step 4: ​Can Stove:

  • Using your exacto knife cut the bottom of another can 1.25 - 1.50 inches from the bottom.

  • Label this as CAN B.

  • Caution: Edges of can are sharp, sand down to prevent cuts.

Step 5: ​Can Stove:

  • Take CAN A and using the awl, puncture 12 holes around the side of CAN A evenly spaced.

Step 6: ​Can Stove:

  • Take CAN A and using the awl, puncture 3 holes centered into the bottom of CAN A.

Step 7: ​Can Stove:

  • Take CAN A, and using the awl, puncture 6 holes around the bottom rim of CAN A evenly spaced.

Step 8: Can Stove:

  • Take CAN A and using the needlenose pliers, bend the metal inward at each hole around the side of CAN A.

Step 9: Can Stove:

  • Insert CAN A into CAN B to create the stove.

  • Make sure the cans are tightly secured to each other before ignition to prevent cans from popping apart during ignition.

Step 10: Can Stove:

  • CAUTION: Do not let heet touch your skin, if you do immediately wash the affected area.

  • Measure ¼ cup of heet or isopropyl and pour into the 3 holes punctured in the CAN A. (This will last for approximately 15 mins)

  • Pour some heet or isopropyl around the rim of the can for easy ignition.

Step 11: Can Stove:

  • Ignite the rim of the can.

  • Caution: Heat produced by the can stove can exceed temperatures of 700 degrees fahrenheit.

Step 12: Can Stove

  • Place penny over the 3 holes immediately after.

  • The penny functions to prevent flames from coming out of the center of the can to conserve fuel.

  • Caution: Heat produced by the can stove can exceed temperatures of 700 degrees fahrenheit.

Step 13: Can Stove

  • Repeat Steps 1 - 10 and create 3 more cans

  • Taking your DIY Can Stove's, made through steps 1-11, continue to the Convection Heater instruction set to finish the build.

Step 14: Convection Heater:

  • Assemble the 4 unlit can stoves in a square formation and place your rocks or bricks on both sides of the cans to provide support for the clay pots.

  • Make sure all 4 cans are filled with fuel and ready for ignition.

  • (Optional): Place the can stoves on a metal tray/sheet if heating indoors to avoid spillage and fire hazards.

Step 15: Convection Heater:

  • Place the 8 inch pot on top of the rocks centralized around the can stoves.

  • Place a ball of tinfoil large enough to plug the hole located on the top of the pot to stop hot air from escaping out the pots.

Step 16: Convection Heater:

  • Place the 10 inch clay pot on top of the 8 inch pot centralized around the can stoves.
    Place a ball of tinfoil large enough to plug the hole on the top of on the pot to stop hot air from escaping out the pots.

Step 17: Convection Heater:

  • PROCEED WITH CAUTION

  • Place the 12 inch clay pot on the rocks on top of the two other pots.

  • At this point all that is left is to ignite the 4 cans.

  • Carefully remove the cans from under the pots one by one .

  • Ignite the cans one by one and carefully place them back under the pots.

  • Once ignited simply wait for the surrounding area to heat up.

  • CAUTION: Pots will become hot, avoid touching them with bare hands until cool. The heater can potentially exceed temperatures of 700 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • Once the cans need to be refueled seeing that each will last approximately 15 minutes, simply wait a few minutes after the can stove has gone out to allow for it to cool down, carefully remove the can stove out from under the pots, refuel the can stove, and reignite the can stove.

Comments

author
Soffiiaa28 (author)2016-04-27

Great job! I'll Definitely be using this sometime soon

author
candleheater (author)2016-04-27

To address the questions: The amount of time the heater last varies on how much Heet you use, but in general it should last you between 15-30 minutes. The pots trap the heat that is emitted from the can stoves, so with the pots the heat produced should last up to 1 hour or more. This down time leaves a lot of time to refuel the stoves. Safety is a big issue I would love to address it, I do not recommend having the heater on a wooden surface, and the area should have some airflow because fumes from Heet if breathed directly for longer than a minute or so isn't the best for your body. Also, I wouldn't recommend using the heater in a small space just because it gets extremely hot, 700 + degrees hot. Thank you for all your comments I am happy to answer anymore. :)

author
threeoutside (author)2016-04-26

You could add a pair of BBQ or kitchen tongs to your equipment list, for removing and replacing the stoves in the last step. Also, can you address the question of safety? Is this safe to use in an enclosed space? No dangerous gases emitted? If not, this is an ingenious Instructable and very nicely done!

author
jabujavi (author)2016-04-26

Where is the difference between using pots and without it? Equal burned energy, so equal generated hot...

author
Lorddrake (author)2016-04-26

Have you had a chance to test to see if (in regards to how much you can warm an area) you are better off running all four heaters at once for the 15 minute burn time, or running them one at a time to get 60 minutes of burn time

author
tomatoskins (author)2016-04-25

Very cool! How long does your heater last?

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