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I need a Coat Rack, to hang my coat and laptop bag when I get home. I couldn't find one that I liked to buy and making one out of Iron pipe was a little too expensive. I decided to make one out of wood.

The finished project should be a 6 foot tall coat rack that is 21 1/2" at the base.

The goals of the project were.

1. Easy

2. Minimal tools

3. Cheap

4. One stop shopping ( I got everything at Lowe's this time)

Materials needed:

2 X 2x4x8 lumbar (Hem-Fir Select Stud)

24 X 2 1/2 wood screws (or less)

1 Pack quantity 4 Leveling Guides

2 X Screw-In Utility Hook

2 X Large Screw-In Bike Hook

4 X Small Screw-In Bike Hook

your choice of wood finish.

stain, paint, or naked. I choose to stain it black (Ebony penetrating stain, and a few coats of Spar Urethane)

Tools Needed

Miter box

Saw

Tape measure

Drill

Drill bits - 1/8", 7/32", 5/16", and 3/8"

#2 Phillips bit

6" quick release bar clamps (Optional, really came in handy)

orbital hand sander

80 grit sand paper

220 grit sand paper

Step 1: Materials

2 X 2x4x8 lumbar (Hem-Fir Select Stud)
24 X 2 1/2" wood screws (or less)

1 Pack quantity 4 Leveling Guides

2 X Screw-In Utility Hook

2 X Large Screw-In Bike Hook

4 X Small Screw-In Bike Hook

your choice of wood finish.

stain, paint, or naked. I choose to stain it black (Ebony penetrating stain, and a few coats of Spar Urethane)

Step 2: Measure, Cut and Drill the Wood

There will be 8 cuts total. the first 4 cuts are straight. the last 4 cuts are cut at 45 degree angle just so it looks good. you can skip the last step if your lazy.

1 - Take the 2x4x8 lumber and measure 12 inches from the end.

2 - Place the 2x4 into the miter box and cut 90 degrees along the mark. Make sure you cut on the out side of the mark. so when you are done you will have an exactly 12 inch piece of wood.

3 - Measure 12 inches from the end again.

4 - Place the 2x4 in the miter box and cut along 90 degrees along the mark again. Make sure you cut on the out side of the mark again.

Now you should have 3 piece of wood 2 X 12" and 1 X 6 foot pieces of wood.

Do the same to the 2nd 2x4x8 (repeat step 1-4)

when are all done, you should have 4 12" pieces of wood (the legs). and 2 long about 6 foot section of wood (the post).

5 - take one of the 12" piece of wood and cut 45 degrees from the end. measuring doesn't matter. as long as you use the same reference points for all 4 pieces. ( actually you can skip this step if you want a unfinished look)

6 - measure 1 1/5" from the bottom side of the 45 degree cut side of the wood.( you can skip this step if you want a unfinished look)

7 - Drill a pilot hold with the 1/8" drill bit in the middle of the wood and the 1 1/2" mark ( this is where the Leveling Guides will be installed at a later step)

8 - now enlarge the hole with the 3/8" drill bit.

8 - Repeat for the other 3 leg pieces.

Step 3: Sand Everything

now its time to sand everything. did I tell you this was the best part!!! (NOT!)

I didn't take any pictures of this part, because I love this part sooo much. its always a joy to get saw dust everywhere.

using the 80 grit sand paper go over everything. Make sure you round over the corners on the legs.

once you have everything sanded down use the 220 grit sand paper and go over everything again. everything should be nice and smooth.

Step 4: Assembly - Putting It All Togethere

Here is where the fun starts.

start with the Post. take the 2, 6 foot pieces you have and stack them side by side. make sure you line them up side to side and even.

1 - Use the clamp and clamp about the middle.

2 - Drill a 1/8" pilot hole.

3 - use the 5/16" drill bit and follow the pilot hole for only 1/4" or less. this allows the screw to sit under the surface of the wood.

4 - screw in a 2 1/2" screw making sure the screw head is under the surface and not through the wood

5 - to to one end of the post and clamp the wood together. make sure everything is lined up.

6 - make a pilot hole and follow with the 5/16" bit again

7 - screw in another 2 1/2" screw.

8 - repeat for the other side.

9 - now go to the middle between the screws. clamp the post together and now make 2 pilot holes side by side and follow with the 5/16" counter sink holes. screw in the holes.

10 - repeat for the other side with the 2 holes.

you should now have the post assembled.

11 - installing the first leg. line up the leg to the edge of the post and at the bottom of the post. make a effort to make sure everything is squared as best as possible. its ok to be a little off. you have the leveling guides to make up for things.

12 - clamp the leg in place so you can make the pilot holes and counter sink hole. screw it together. each leg should have about 3 screws to hold everything together.

13 - repeat for the 3 other legs. when your done your legs should look like the picture.

Step 5: Final Assembly and Finishing

now your almost done. drill 5/16" holes at the top about 1 1/2" - 2" from the top and 1" deep, and in the center. Do that for all 4 sides.

About half way in the post ( or what ever you seem to prefer) drill 7/32": holes about 1" deep in the middle of the wood on all 4 sides.

if you want to keep the wood natural with no finish you are almost done. just screw in the hooks and install the leveling guides and your all done.

If you want paint or stain the wood do that before you install the hooks and leveling guides. I choose to stain the wood black.

Now you have a sturdy coat rack that doesn't wobble and sturdy.

I hope you have enjoyed this project. let me know if there is anything that is unclear.

<p>Aye! used a 2x2 and a few 2x4s, and didn't have any hooks handy; screws did the trick (it's covered by a few coats and sweaters anyway, mwahaha)<br><br>since I was using a smaller post, two screws per leg and one going into the next leg over seemed sufficient for my needs.<br><br>also, instead of using levelling guides, I just filed and sanded as needed until it was level enough, then added some felt pads underneath. worked like a charm!<br><br>thank you for the inspiration, good sir, this was a very fun project. here she is, next to my old Brunswick &amp; typewriter, right by my front door.</p>
<p>Aye! used a 2x2 and a few 2x4s, and didn't have any hooks handy; screws did the trick (it's covered by a few coats and sweaters anyway, mwahaha)<br><br>since I was using a smaller post, two screws per leg and one going into the next leg over seemed sufficient for my needs.<br><br>also, instead of using levelling guides, I just filed and sanded as needed until it was level enough, then added some felt pads underneath. worked like a charm!<br><br>thank you for the inspiration, good sir, this was a very fun project. here she is, next to my old Brunswick &amp; typewriter, right by my front door.</p>
great job

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