Introduction: DIY DeodoLight

This is a flashlight / dimlight made from  antiperspirant deodorant (casing), a cellphone battery and 2 white LED. The switch of this flashlight is the bottom rotating part.

I made this instructable not only to have an entry for the contest. I made this instructable - "DeodoLight" because its rainy season here in the Philippines and that means typhoons are back! Power interruptions these days are common, plus the fact that our country is facing power shortage.

This is my second time making this kind of project (of the same concept). I remember making a flashlight made also from Rexona deodorant (mini stick) before when I was high school. The only difference. . . I publish it this time in instuctables!

I'm not an electronics expert, comments and suggestions are welcome.

Step 1: Materials and Tools Needed

1- Rexona antiperspirant deodorant (case only) - I got this from my brother, of course its used. For the purpose of easy typing, I would call this rexona instead of antiperspirant deodorant.

1- Cellphone battery, (I got a class A Nokia BLD-3, 720 mAh) I also had BLC-2 (3310) battery but it was "too" big for the casing of rexona. I prefer also motorola batteries because it is quite smaller and lighter.

1- Universal cellphone charger for re-charging your chosen battery

2- 5mm white LED, I got 1 from a  broken flashlight and the other from the electronics shop for PHP 20 (about USD 0.435). Later I found out it only cost PHP15 from another store. ^____^

2- LED "receptacle" (I ain't sure what really is this). I got this from our broken CPU on/off and reset switches.

couple of thin wires (I also got from the CPU)

1 Pin

2 thumbtacks

a small Copper conductor (I got this from a broken Nokia 7360's back casing)

I.D. lanyard (optional)

a plastic prepaid card

a pair of scissor

cutter

multi-tester / multimeter

I will also included this although I did not use this for some reasons.

A drill (I don't have this^__^)

Soldering iron (I ran out of solder)

Step 2: Cleaning

Empty the rexona pack. I cut  the "stick-like" plastic inside the pack. Wipe out some deodorant remains (I like the smell). The rotating bottom part of the rexona will be the switch and the main casing will contain the battery, wires and the LED.

Step 3: Wiring

For the switch:
The switch is removable from the main casing. Remove this for ease of wiring it.
There is a mounted part on the switch which will be the contact surface for the main case. Punch two small holes between the mounted part and insert the wires through it and knot it underneath.

For the main casing:
The casing has dismounted part (contrary to the switch). Do the same wiring procedures in the switch but use longer wires. Use a cutter to scrape off plastic near the dismounted part. This is to reduce the friction induce on the wires when switching ON/OFF/ rotating the switch.

Use multi-tester to check if the switch is working. The flashlight should turn ON/OFF alternately when rotated 180 degrees parallel to the casing.

For the Cap:
Drill 2 holes (for the LEDs) equidistant from the center of the cap. Since I had no drill I used cutter and sandpaper to make a hole.


LEDs are connected in parallel.

Step 4: Battery Holder

I created a "battery holder" out of a plastic prepaid card. Originally I was planning to use a button cell battery which I find expensive because it is not rechargeable.

Refer to the diagram for this procedure. The dimensions depends on what type of battery will be use. Luckily the BLD-3 fits snugly to the rexona case. Cut out the prepaid card. Then "Origami" is as follows. Then I punch the card using the multi-tester probe. This is where the   wires is to be inserted and the copper conductor.

Better if wire and copper are soldered before inserted to the hole.

Connect the LED receptacle in parallel to the wires from the batteries and from the switch (see the diagram at the 3rd step of this instuctable).Then put the LEDs to the receptacle.

Step 5: Installation / Finishing

Insert the battery first then the wires. Insert the LED through the cap's hole then close it. I attached lanyard at the bottom of the switch. Tadaaa! It's done!



Standby time: 12 hours

Thanks for viewing! Hope you like it. Please rate and vote for it!



Comments

author
Lindie (author)2010-08-07

That's cool. Pretty bright, too!

About This Instructable

1,745views

5favorites

Bio: civil engineering student
More by acosicris:DIY AquaPod Made From PPR PipeArtwork from Cell Phone PCB4-AA USB Charger for Cellphones & MP3 players
Add instructable to: