loading

This is a simple electric sander that you can make at home if you have a small 12V drill machine, the one used for printed circuit boards. I needed a small handy sander for a project since sanding manually with hands is time consuming and difficult sometimes. Moreover, it works great with metals too, and it's made from all old parts, since my drill is pretty old too now. So lets start.

Step 1: Things You Need

12V electric drill

Some metal sheet (I used an old cookie sweet box)

Sandpaper (You can use any grit, but for metals and material removal, use 100,200 or 300 grit)

Old toy wheels and a steel rod. You can use a steel rod that comes as an axle for the same wheel. I used an old cloth hanger, and a toy train wheel.

Step 2: Cut the Metal and Join the Wheel

Now cut the metal sheet in a circle, slightly bigger than the wheel. Cut the sandpaper to the same size. Keep the diameter about 2-3 inches according to your requirement. Join the wheel with the steel rod to the metallic plate. Just use superglue to stick the two together. Make sure to mark the center before doing this.

Step 3: Cut the Sandpaper and Stick It On

Now cut the sandpaper in a circle same as the metal sheet. Use double sided thin tape to stick it to the metal plate since it can be reused, or just use any adhesive.

Step 4: Sand Away...

Start sanding. The drill is a little low on power but gets the work done, without spending extra money. Just change the sandpaper when it gets worn out!

<p>Will the heat generated by the sanding affect the glue? Are there types of glue that are heat resistant?</p><p>Love this idea!!! </p>
<p>Sand Paper + Plastic/steel sheet attachment with glue gun, no extensive heat produces in between this, </p><p>Note.... Make thicker glue layer between Nail and steel/plastic <br>plate... because dremel speed can detach nail from steel/plastic plate <br>very easily. My disc flown but fortunately saved from damage.</p>
I've used it for my scale model car project very extensively, changed about 25 sandpapers after every one was worn out. Nothing happened to glue. I don't think superglue is affected by this heat, since the motor does not have very high torque. It takes time but gets about any work done.
<p>Don't forget to reduce the motor speed, you would not want something like this disc flying at you in 10000+ rpm's :)</p>
Hey thanks. The motor does not have a lot of torque so it slows down on contact. Slowing the speed can only be done by reducing voltage (or otherwise using a geared motor which is not very convenient in here). Just make sure to balance it. But still, safety first, protect eyes atleast.

About This Instructable

4,353views

71favorites

License:

Bio: To be - engineer in the near future. Car enthusiast. Loves making and breaking things!
More by dosimeter:Saw Blade From an Old CD Drive A Scale Model Car Body from Trash DIY Electric Sander  
Add instructable to: