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Based on my original "PVC Deadly Nerf Dart Blowgun", this video takes that relatively simple project and ups the ante considerably. By utilizing a 4" by 12" PVC air reservoir, much more air pressure can be delivered to the Nerf darts than a pair of lungs could hope to.  An old Ryobi cordless drill sans motor serves as the gun grip, trigger, and battery.  When the trigger is pulled, the battery powers up an Orbit brand 1" sprinkler valve which releases the pressurized air into the 1/2" PVC barrel and propels the projectile towards the target.

With this much power pushing the Nerf darts, they exhibit signs of instability in flight and sometimes tear apart. The next phase of this project will focus on coming up with a better performing projectile.
<p>Hey, sweet gun. Almost every pneumatic gun I have seen has taken out the solenoid and just epoxied the holes. Smart using the electric drill. </p><p>I have a tip for you that might work. You said that your bullets aren't that practical. First of all, the reason the aren't so aerodynamic is simply physics. You have a lot of push from behind. If you have ever tried to push down a metal spring with your bare hands, you'll know its pretty hard without the spring slipping. My suggestion would be to put some drag on the back. You could hot glue about 6 or 7 foot-long lengths of string or yarn in the little cavity in the back of the nerf bullet. This should make it so the back of the bullet is pulled back, reducing the overall speed of the projectile, but increasing the accuracy and possibly range.</p><p>Good Luck,</p><p>Sebastian</p>
Would you be able to send me a link (or some other helpful info) as to the exact drill model that is? All the one's I've found are different diameters (the casings, at least). <br> <br>Also, would it be possible (with a larger air reservoir of course) to take multiple shots before refilling with air? Or does the trigger-valve system not allow for that?
Hi Pretz, I believe the model # is HP1802M. If you Google &quot;Ryobi HP1802M Drill Ebay&quot; you should find a bunch of them. I don't think they are made any more as it is the old style that ran on Ni-Cad batteries (I could be wrong about that though). As for multiple shots, the trigger-valve system allows for that just fine. I just typically let it all go in one blast for maximum power. The reservoir drains so quickly that it would be hard to get maximum power for follow up shots - it would need quite a large reservoir.

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