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Step 2: Load Calculation

Knowing how much power you need is the first step to planning your array. Since solar panels are measured by how much energy they can absorb, this will tell you how many panels to buy, how efficient they need to be, and (perhaps most importantly) how much space you're going to require. Don't worry, this process doesn't require more than your utility bills and some basic math.

First, check out your utility bills to see how much energy you usually consume. Typically, this number falls around 900 kWh each month, but it varies wildly from household to household.

Next, find out the "peak sun hours" of your area. This number is a measurement of how sunny someplace is. On the West coast, this number is between six and seven hours; on the East coast, between four and five. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has an excellent insolation map. Follow the link for Photovoltaics under U.S. Solar Resource Map.

All that's left now is to do the math. At 900 kWh each month, you're burning 30 kWh each day. Divide this number by the daily peak sun hours. If I use 30 kWh in a day, and there's five hours of sunlight, then I need 6 kW worth of panels to match all of my usage.
<p>I built my own Solar Panel following this excellent guide I found <a href="http://the-natural-treatment.com/Solarpanel.php" rel="nofollow">HERE</a>.</p>
<p>You can take instructions from inplix website :-)</p>
<p>I was wonder if you have any information on adding a house battery for when the grid goes down. I realize it's not as economically advantageous as the original solar installation. biggest ques</p>
<p>They have really oversimplified a complicated process. If you go playing with your electricity to your home, you will likely burn your house down. And if you believe the electric company (who currently has a monopoly for your business) will pay you a premium for you to generate electricity, then you are very naive. </p>
<p>actually it is simple, the hardest part was the paper work to setup net metering. Which was worth it. The $1000 check at the ends of the year is great. </p>
<p>actually it is simple, the hardest part was the paper work to setup net metering. Which was worth it. The $1000 check at the ends of the year is great. </p>
Hey the... Love what you do! I have a anker 2nd gen astrole 5 external power pack with dual usb out put and micro usb input for charging. I want to use solar lawn lights to charge it but i dont know much the anker or solar so could you plz help me out?
<p>Thats right</p>
<p>Any tips on wiring the solar array to the house wiring?</p>
<p>I made a video explaining how to select the right wire for your solar system. https://youtu.be/89u8R_aUFO4 </p>
<p>This may come across as a slightly odd question but i have a thatched/grass roof house and was wondering if solar panels give off any heat that may cause a fire risk to the roof?</p>
<p>I saw these in Mexico. I would stay away from high voltage systems, but a small system properly installed should not be a problem.</p>
How can i get solar when my power comepny will let me tie in to them
<p>Just do an OFF GRID solar install. If you use led lights and use conservative power, you can get by nicely on a 3000 watt system. I myself don't understand why people go solar and still tie to the grid, if the grid is down, you still have no power, however with an off grid battery bank, you do. </p>
<p>Thank you. Been looking for something like this. </p>
<p>really good information about solar home. here i have got a site which is about green living and <a href="http://www.wiselivingjournal.com/" rel="nofollow">wise living</a>.</p>
<p>Nice guidelines on planning a Solar Array. As a beginner I am happy to get these information. Previously I read <a href="http://solarhomeguides.com/" rel="nofollow">solar home guide</a> blog.</p>
<p>Hi,</p><p>I'm glad that I found this site! Yes, the price of installing pv system is still gradually falling, our saving are increasing, and that's great. I hope that people will turn to being more environment-friendly. To all reading it: we have to start being more responsible for our environment and use renewable sources of energy. It's really not that hard to design and do all the installations, especially now, that we have better tools to do it, like the apps ( this one for example <a href="http://easysolar.co/" rel="nofollow">http://easysolar.co/</a> ) that practically do everything for you, design, calculate the azimuth, provide you with simulations and financial analysis and save your time! We have to start to make good changes... Oh, and good luck to all beginners!</p><p> <br>Elizabeth</p>
<p>Great instuctable! A few points:</p><p>If you live in a HOA, be sure to check your covenants for solar panel restrictions. Mine prohibited them; three of us proposed and got passed new covenants with defining approved installs. Not as good as all balls-out, but sufficient for a good install. BTW, this cost about $5K so try to roll this in with other changes the board has been talking about, plus be ready to go door-to-door to get people to say OK. Took us a year and 2 months - we have a small (600 house) subdivision. YMMV.</p><p>BE very sure to check with your local power provider AND your state regulator. Our local company (GA Power) won't buy back power because GA prohibits it - not that they would unless pressured by the state. Next on the list: Petitioning our local state representative to support a bill allowing it (it has failed 4 times in the past 5 years - but like all things political, squeaky wheels).</p><p>If you use am installer, make sure they can provide you with workman's comp and liability insurance proof AND call the companies and verify the policies are still in effect. Both of these are expensive and easy to cancel - if you don't check you could end up paying for a hurt worker for life or fixing damage.</p>
Thanks this is the best I have seen I surfed the web and found such bewildering stories that it ends in frustrations
The Free Energy shop is developed for people who love nature and a sustainable way of living. At this moment we offer wind, solar energy and electronic gadget products. <a href="http://www.freenergyshop.com/" rel="nofollow">Solar Gadgets</a>
<br> shortw, thanks for reading! It is true that the incentives come with some stipulations, but they are not so terrible. Let's take a look at the points you've brought up.<br> <strong>Panel cost: </strong>You do not need to splurge on &quot;premium&quot; panels - most panels are eligible, as long as you don't buy them used.<br> <strong>Taxes:</strong> In many states and cities (such as Virginia, where I live), tax exemption programs prevent your solar energy system from being counted as part of your taxed property value, and many townships will waive your building permit fee.<br> <strong>Reselling: </strong>This has a lot to do with where you live and who you buy your power from. TVA runs one of the largest buyback programs, so let's look at them as an example. TVA, in addition to providing a $1,000 bonus just for signing up, will pay you 12 cents above retail price for your energy - this is about double the price, not a quarter of it. Small, localized systems reduce a lot of strain on the grid and help the utility company build a greener image, so they are more than happy to buy energy from you at a premium.<br> <strong>Batteries: </strong>Most on-grid systems don't require them, but they are not annoying to deal with. AGM batteries require no maintenance and last around five years, while VRLA batteries require minimal maintenance and last for 20.<br> Going solar is expensive at first, but the incentive programs really do help with the cost - especially if you live in a solar-friendly state like California or Colorado. If you want to know more about incentives in your area, check out our article at <a href="http://www.solartown.com/learning/solar-panels/going-solar-what-are-the-economic-incentives" rel="nofollow">http://www.solartown.com/learning/solar-panels/going-solar-what-are-the-economic-incentives</a>. If you have any other questions, don't be afraid to ask!<br>
Look here, there are a ton of instructables on building cheap solar panels, and they usually produce at least 75% of a ``premium`` one.<br><br>And they usually cost less than half.
I guess the question is how cheap is cheap? A long long time ago, some guy told me &quot;you get what you paid for&quot; it is true but it is always good to find a great deal :)
But I stated with hands on just like Solar Jon is showing, <br>I use a weed-eater motor on my project, where I live wind is only good during hurricane seasons. <br>Then moved to Solar power. I bought kits off EBay, 200 watts of 0.5 volt, 3.25 watt per cells. Looks easy, works out, after you add the weather proof housing, harden glass; remember rain, hail, and snow. It is not cheaper. I did build the first 100 watt panel, yes it works. I resold the rest of kit back on EBay. Let us face a few facts, Big Company&rsquo;s buy in Big Lots, like Wal-Mart! Small stores cannot compete. <br>Real power, that which is to supply a real house, like in Jon's photo, is not cheap, but you can do it. The cost is really cheaper with the Store bought Solar Panel then the do-it-Yourself kits. I know that sounds silly and just plain wrong. You can buy UL listed, made in the USA solar panel with big boy ratings, like 280 watts @ 35 volts for under $1.35/watt shipped to Your house. I know this because I bought 24 of them last year. You can save Big if your install yourself. But you will require a licensed Electrical guy to connect up to the gird. No city government wishes to have just anyone connecting into the grid. That can get you killed, blackout and neighborhood. <br>Yes, Zero Rebate if you want to use homemade cell, or anything Not UL, but only if your On-grid. <br>A 5 Kw system retails for $25k installed in the New Orleans area. My 8Kw cost $12k in material; mounting will be about $800. On this UL proper installed system the Fed will credits 30% if installed before 2016. Most cities and states also have Tax credits. These are 20 to 30 year systems. Do the math. <br>No I do not work with, own stock, have a brother or lover working for or any other interest in www.sunelec.com they are surely not the only folks either. Where there is one, there are many. You can click and see if I&rsquo;m jerking your chain or not. <br> <br>This will either get you hooked or not, I hope everyone wishing to live on less oil the very best of luck with what every project you do, have fun, and be safe. You can hook up any thing that makes electrical power with micro convertors, see EBay. From 500 watt DC to house wall plug. Under $100, search &ldquo;Solar inverter&rdquo;. <br> <br>Thanks Solar Jon, for hopefully hooking a few more people to Green Power movement. <br> <br>Best Regards <br>Big Jake <br>
Here in Orange County, New York, the local Utility provider is Orange &amp; Rockland Utilities. A Doctor here solarized his home and they only gave him pennies for his electicity that he sent back through his meter to the grid. As usual a Large Monopoly sticks it to the consumer when he tries to save energy and avoids their price per Kwh. As we speak, they are asking for another increase in rates! How much greed can there be?
your buddy will break even at some and then really stick it to the util... when it comes to feed in, it really depends on location and what homeowners want to achieve. If i'm not mistaken ny has netmetering so your friend will be saving a lot of money from whatever the solar energy covers... the energy he consumes from the utility on the other hand will continue to go up at the discretion of the util overlord :(

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