Instructables
Picture of DIY Marbled Fabric
dyed fabric.JPG
dyed shoes.JPG
I was browsing Pinterest one day and came across instructions on how to dye paper to create a marbled effect. (You can find it here). The paper looked gorgeous and I was curious to see whether the same technique could be applied to fabric. In this instructable I will show you how I "marbled dyed" some fabric and a pair of canvas shoes.
 
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Step 1: What you will need

  • Shaving foam
  • *Liquid fabric dye/paint
  • Fabric you wish to dye (natural fibres work best ie. cotton)
  • Disposable gloves
  • Plastic sheet/garbage bag
  • Paper towel
  • Tooth pick, Popcicle stick or stirrer of some sort
For dyeing shoes, same as above, plus:
  • Painters tape
  • Tissue paper (for stuffing the shoes)
  • More plastic, from a shopping bag, something a bit firmer
  • Scissors
*As you can see from my photo, I used Rit dye in powdered form since I didn't have any other fabric paint/dye at home to use.  What I did with the Rit powder was combined roughly 1:2 powder to hot water (twice as much water than powder), mixed well and used right away.

Step 2: Prepare foam

  • Lay out a plastic sheet (or garbage bag) on your work surface -to protect it and make clean up easier. 
  • I put the foam directly onto the plastic sheet (you could use a cookie sheet but you probably shouldn't use it with food again -see safety information for your fabric dye/paint). 
  • I covered an area roughly the same size as the material I wanted to dye. 
  • Using your hands or the straight edge of a piece of cardboard spread out the foam to an even thickness, making sure the whole area is covered.
786Ayesha10 months ago
Great Ible.All the best
AmyCat5911 months ago
Interesting results... The traditional marbling techniques (for paper and fabric) involve "floating" your paints/dyes atop a pan of water or gel, and then swirling, "combing", etc. to get the patterns. I didn't know it would work with a shaving-cream base! These look great!

If you want a better (brighter, more permanent/colorfast) dye than RIT (which will "bleed" every time you wash the items, unfortunately), check out Dharma Trading Co. (Beware: you'll want to spend far too much and try all sorts of new crafts!) They stock dyes which, as long as they're properly used, stay colorfast even with normal machine-washing in warm water, and won't bleed onto, or stain, the rest of your laundry. (I've done a lot of tie-dye with Procion, and launder my t-shirts with everything else... no pink and lavender stains on my partner's white socks!)
ChrysN (author)  AmyCat5911 months ago
Yes, I think it is traditionally done placing the dyes on carrageen or methyl cellulose, the results look amazing. I guess you could say this is the amateur's version. Thanks for the tip about the dye.
bob303011 months ago
Nice! Your project turned out great. This looks like a fun project for a Birthday party of rainy day craft. Thanks for posting.
poofrabbit11 months ago
Hey cool! I've also wondered how this would work on fabric. Nicely done!
lindarose9211 months ago
I love how the shoes turned out, great 'ible!
kyluddy11 months ago
That's cool
ChrysN (author)  kyluddy11 months ago
Thanks!