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WATCH VIDEO HERE

After building my new shop I soon realized that it was really hard to breathe with all the dust I was making. After coughing up a lung I decided to hurry up and make a DIY Shop Air Cleaner before my lungs get caked with sawdust. This is what I came up with.

It is essentially just a wooden box with a blower motor sucking dirty air through a set of filters and blowing out fresh clean air.

If you would like a FREE copy of the SketchUp drawings for this project you can download them from my website by clicking HERE

Materials and Tools used:

3/4 – Sheet of 3/4″ Plywood

8×8 Air Register

16x20x1 Air Filter

8″ Inline Duck Fan

Table Saw

Circular Saw

Miter Saw

Tape Measure

Speed Square

Combination Square

Nail Gun Set

Cordless Drill

Cordless Impact Driver

Countersink Drill Bits

Clamps

RZ Dust Mask

CAMERA EQUIPMENT USED:

Nikon D5500

Action Cam

Microphone

Shop Tripod

Gorilla Pod

Lighting

Step 1: Cutting the Lumber

Using the free plans that you downloaded from my website ( Click HERE if you haven't ), cut out the 3/4″ plywood according to the cut list. I used a hand held circular saw to cross cut the pieces to rough size, then finished them off on the table saw. I like this method because it allows me to break down the pieces to a more manageable size before ripping them to final dimensions on the table saw.

Please see PLANS and VIDEO for reference.

Step 2: Cutting the Specialty Pieces

Now that you have all of your pieces cut, it is time to cut out the the circle for the blower fan, cut out the bottom section, and cut out the square for front air register. You can use any tool you have available that can cut through wood but I used my trusty Black and Decker Matrix with the jig saw attachment.

Please see PLANS and VIDEO for reference.

Step 3:

Now it is time to assemble the wooden box. The construction of the box is very simple, I used glue and brad nails to attach the pieces together. Reference the plans and the video above for details on how I do this and hopefully it helps you figure out how to assemble yours.

Please see PLANS and VIDEO for reference.

Step 4: Attaching the Filter Frames

The filters that I used for this air cleaner measure 16"x20"x1" so I designed my air cleaner to accommodate this size filter. As per the cut list in my FREE PLANS, I cut plywood strips 1" wide and use them to create a frame to house the filters. I measure and mark the locations of the filter frames and attach the strips with wood glue and brad nails. Once I have all the frames attached, I then attach the bottom of the box. This piece has a large square cut out that holds the filters in place but also allows full airflow through the filters.

Please see PLANS and VIDEO for reference.

Step 5: Make It Air Tight

Now that most of the box is assembled it is very important to make sure that the intake portion of the box is air tight. Any type of sealant will work for this but you must not skip this step. It is vital that all air being blown out of the discharge of your air cleaner passes through the filters first. If you have gaps or leaks in your box air and dust will get sucked in and re-circulate back into your space.

At this point you should also install your blower fan and make sure that you seal that as well.

Please see PLANS and VIDEO for reference.

Step 6: Attach the Front and Air Register

Now you are almost done. There are only a few steps left.

Attach the front piece with the 8"x8" square cut out of the center to the box using some more wood glue and brad nails.

Insert the air register into the 8"x8" opening and use the 2 screws that are provided with the register.

Please see PLANS and VIDEO for reference.

Step 7: Install Filters and Turn It ON

Not much left to do except popping in the two filters and installing the air cleaner somewhere in your shop.

I hung mine on the ceiling right above my miter saw because that is where the most sawdust is generated in my shop. I have had mine running for a few weeks now and I have to say that having an Air Cleaner makes a huge difference in the air quality in my shop. I am very glad that I took the few hours it took me to build this project.

Thank you so much if you made it this far.


Please view all of the detailed photos, download the FREE PLANS, and watch the VIDEO for reference.

If you have any questions at all please leave a comment.

If you like this project PLEASE consider following my Instructable profile.

<p>Looks like something that would help alot!</p><p>What was the cost of all components in a rough estimation?</p><p>How often do you change the filters?</p>
<p>How long does this take to clean your shop air after a sawing session? Matthias Wandel built something similar (larger) a while back, but his shop is much larger than mine so I'm not sure yet how much power I'll need.</p>
Hey there, thanks for reading my Instructable and for your comment! The blower motor that I used states that it provides 420 cfm of air flow so in a perfect world at that rate it should be able to clean all the air in my shop in less than 5 minutes. That would be a bit of an exaggeration though because 1. I don't think that it actually does provide 420 cfm (more like 300 cfm) and 2. Once the filters get caked with sawdust, they restrict the air flow quite a bit. I think that with my setup and with clogged filters it recirculates more like 200 cfm. With all that said, my shop is 12' x 16' x about 8' tall (almost 1600 cubic ft) /200 cfm it should take more like 10 minutes to clean the air. I mounted mine pretty centrally and near my biggest sawdust maker (my miter saw) and I run it continuously while working. I notice that after about 10 to15 minutes the air is dust free. I leave it on sometimes over night and I come back in to my shop the next day to a fresh clean air shop. Matthais mounted his air cleaner(s) in the corner of his shop which I think is a lot less effective. Hope this helps!
<p>Matthias has some gadget for measuring airborne particulates, and I don't, so your numbers are very helpful. I think our spaces are similar, ,though I'm just in a one-car garage. Once I found sawdust is a carcinogen (yes, really) I always wear a mask while working, but filtration still makes a lot of sense. Glue-ups, finishing, welding, general repairs, etcetera, etcetera, they all occur in the same space. Thanks!</p>

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Bio: I am a Building Automation Engineer at a major University in California. My favorite people in the world are my wife Bouavon, and my two ... More »
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