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What is Teagueduino?

Teagueduino is an open source electronic board and interface that allows you to realize creative ideas without soldering or knowing how to code, while teaching you the ropes of programming and embedded development (like arduino). Teagueduino is designed to help you discover your inner techno-geek and embrace the awesomeness of making things in realtime — even if you’ve only ever programmed your VCR.

This project we originally created by Teague, and was fully backed by supporters on Kickstarter (check out the detailed Teagueduino post on Kickstarter here). We made 300+ kits, and now we want to open it up for the world to make, too!

In this instructable we'll show you how to solder up your very own Teagueduino board. Enjoy :)

 
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Step 1: Get the parts

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To get started, you'll need some parts. 

See the Teagueduino bill of materials for part numbers and links to order from DigiKey. Get everything in the first section, and note the quantity of each (for example you'll need 10 connectors, and 5 LEDs).

Perhaps the trickiest part is the Teagueduino PCB. We're hoping to make blank Teagueduino PCBs available in the future, but until then feel free to make your own Teagueduino PCB from the Eagle files.

And if you curious what's happening electrically, take a look at the Teagueduino circuit schematic.

Step 2: Solder in the socket

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First, get out the PCB. 

Add the 40-pin socket (notice that the notch is near the edge of the board). Carefully solder it on the back of the board. A couple of the pins will be more difficult to solder because they are connected to the power/ground planes and quickly diffuse the heat from the soldering iron. Just be patient. 

Step 3: Solder in the connectors

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Now add the 10 3-pin mini-CT connectors. 

Note that you can slightly bend the pins such that the connectors will snap into the PCB nicely. This is handy so that they don't fall out as you turn the board over to solder them in.
pfred22 years ago
I think I'll wait for a Raspberry PI.

ikevin2 years ago
I just can't find 3-pin mini-CT connectors anywhere but digikey. Shipping to Greece is $30 so that's a no. Any other vendor I can get 3-pin mini-CT connectors? Like ebay, amazon? Other compatible connectors would do ( if there are any ).

Any suggestions?

PS: Great tutorial btw :)
Here is a list of distributors for that 3-pin connector: http://www.waldomkits.com/TE-Connectivity/Buy/292207-3

It looks like there a couple in europe that hopefully have better shipping prices . $30 for a couple dollars of parts is indeed too much.

I found that link by googling the manufacturer name and part number on digikey: "TE connectivity 292207-3"

Also, it looks like some vendors might have mismatched images for the connector, but show the correct part # or 3D... Hard to tell what they will actually send you :/

This one in the UK looks like the right part: http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/headers-pcb-receptacles/6832276/

I hope that helps!
mh76dk2 years ago
My VCR still just blinks 00:00 :-(
Well now, that's what happens when you refuse to learn C. You might be able to try to use a WYSIWYG web editor... Of course, you may just make the VCR BSoD...
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