Introduction: DIY Handmade Hexapod With Arduino (Hexdrake)

Picture of DIY Handmade Hexapod With Arduino (Hexdrake)

Hello, I'm David and in this instructable I'll show how I made this hexapod whose name is Hexdrake.

Since I was 16 I became interested in electronic and later in robotics. After getting some level and programming skills using arduino I decided to build a robot something more interesting than a simple robot with two wheels . I liked the idea of having a hexapod but did not have much money to buy one.

So I built a low cost 2DOF hexapod made with hand-cut wood and Sg90 servos.

Step 1: Parts Needed

Picture of Parts Needed

Step 2: Designing the Parts and Making the Templates

Picture of Designing the Parts and Making the Templates

I designed the pieces according to the size of SG90 servos. The CAD file is only for reference. I designed the templates before on paper. I used a sheet of wood about 3 mm of thick. After having the templates the next step is to pass them on to the wooden board.

According to the size of the servo the number of pieces are:

48x A part

6x B

12x C

12x D

12x E

12x F

12x G

12x H

6x I

2x J


Step 3: Time to Cut!!!

Picture of Time to Cut!!!

Tools for this Step:

Saw, lime, electric dril and a good hand.

Before cutting some pieces is easier to drill the holes using a 3mm drill. I advise to use a fine saw to cut all the pieces accurately. After cutting each piece file the edges to be soft.

Step 4: Glue Certain Parts Between Them

Picture of Glue Certain Parts Between Them

Tools for this step:

Glue(cyanoacrylate glue for more strength), tweezers, toilet paper (to clean the excess glue).

To make the main parts of each leg, where the servos are subject I needed to glue 4 A pieces. Then, for each leg glue a piece B with C. And the last thing to be done is to glue two H pieces together.

*Be careful to align the holes well of certain pieces or can also be done is glue before and then do drills the holes.

Step 5: Painting and Decorating

Picture of Painting and Decorating

Materials and tools for this step:

EVA foam(red and black), glue, scissors, rule, pencil and black acrylic paint.

For a more professional finish I paint some of the pieces with black acrylic paint, and cover the body and legs with black and red EVA foam.

Step 6: Attaching the Servos to the Legs and Body

Picture of Attaching the Servos to the Legs and Body

Materials for this step:

A lot of screws, screwdriver and 12 SG-90 servos.

Step 7: Add Electronics and Connect.

Picture of Add Electronics and Connect.

Electronic:

An arduino. USC 16-channel servo controller, UBEC 8A hobbywing, lipo battery.

Power supply:

The servo controller needs two power supplies: servo power supply and chip power supply.

-Servo power supply (+): VS (left of the blue connecting terminal at Position 3 in the figure)
-Servo power supply (‐): GND (middle of the blue connecting terminal at Position 3 in the figure)

Servo power supply’s parameters depend on the parameters of the attached servo. For example, if the SG-90 servo has a power supply of 4V‐5V, the servo power supply can use the power source of 4‐5V.

-Chip power supply (+): VSS (right of the blue connecting terminal at Position 3 in the figure)

-Chip power supply (‐): GND (middle of the blue connecting terminal at Position 3 in the figure)

There is a VSS requirement of 6.5‐12V. If the chip power is input through the VSS port, the power supply has to range from 6.5 to 12V.

Connecting Arduino, USC and servos:

What is marked red in the figure are the servo’s connectors for signal wires (be careful about the direction when
connecting to the servo).

To connect the USC controller simply connect the rx of the USC to the tx of arduino and the tx pin with the rx pin of the USC. And connect GND pin of USC with arduino.


Step 8: Programming

Picture of  Programming

Software for this step:

Arduino IDE, USC sofware.

Before programming with arduino it's necessary to know the limits of all the servos and know the limits values. For example using the mouse to drag the slider in the servo panel (drag the servo panel corresponding to the channel with which the servo is connected). So connecting the USC inside the hexapod with the usb to the program I get all de max and min values of each servo.

Now is time to program the arduino to control the USC. The servo controller is a slave device, meaning that it can either accept commands or execute preset commands. It cannot think at all. Communication protocol: serial communication (TTL level), baud rate 9600, no check bit, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit To control the servo through the servo controller. The Command format are:

-Control one single servo:

#1P1500T100\r\n

Data 1 refers to the servo’s channel.

Data 1500 refers to the servo’ location, in the range 500‐2500.

Data 100 refers to the time of execution and represents the speed, in the range 100‐9999

-Control multiple servos:

#1P600#2P900#8P2500T100\r\n

Data 1, 2, and 8 refer to the servo’s channels

Data 600, 900, and 2500 refer to the locations of the servos that correspond to three channels

Data 100 refers to the time of execution and represents the speed of three servos. Regardless of the number of servos, there is only one time, or one T. The command is executed at the same time; that is, all servos operate simultaneously.

Within the limits of each servo is necessary to calculate the maximum range or "step" of all horizontal servos to find the smallest of them and convert it as the maximum of one step. And this variable enter into the equations of all movements. The same would have to make with the vertical servos.

*Sorry for the poor quality of the first three movies. I record them with an old mobile phone with poor video quality.

New video:

Step 9: Adding Some Personality

Picture of Adding Some Personality

I was thinking about things I could add to my hexapod and one of the things that came to me were adding good eyes. I decided to add the eyes to hexapod to give more expression to the moves or express actions. I designed some sketches on paper of various shapes of eyes. In the end I decided on the design that you can see in the photos.

It's consists of a strip of 32 blue LEDs around the edge and a matrix of 5 rows and 9 columns of red LEDs. Thus the matrix can display various kinds of pupil and it's can move throughout the matrix.

Step 10: Eyes Controller Board

Picture of Eyes Controller Board

To control both eyes I designed a simple first version control board using Inkscape. It's based on two atmega8 controlling both matrix directly. In future versions i will do an improved more effective board for complete control of the matrix and the strip of blue LEDs.

The first step is cut a piece of copper pcb the size of the design. Later cut the drilling template and place it in the copper pcb. This template marks the place where you have to make the holes for the components.
Now it's time to draw the tracks. I used a a sticker to mark the tracks. The next step is put the PCB in the acid and when done thoroughly clean the PCB. And the final step is solder the joystick and the resistor and put the decorative stickers.

*Sorry for the poor quality of this videos. I record them with an old mobile phone.

Step 11: Adding a Jaw

Picture of Adding a Jaw

To make the jaw I did some previous designs in cardboard to find the most correct form for the hexapod. When I found the form, I made the jaw in a small block of aluminum from a heat sink. It is driven by two servos moving together. Later I added inside it a strip of rubber to increase it's grip, and paint and decorate as the same style of the hexapod.

Step 12: Transport Box

Picture of Transport Box

Step 13: Final Result of the Hexapod

Picture of Final Result of the Hexapod

This is the final result of the hexapod. Now in the next step I will esplain how I mount the remote controller for Hexdrake. :)

Step 14: Making the Joysticks Boards:

Picture of Making the Joysticks Boards:

Tools for this step:

Saw, lime. drill.

I designed these boards using Inkscape. These boards have the appropriate size for the original joysticks of the PS2 controllers. The main reason I designed these small boards is to simplify the connections between terminals of the potentiometers and the button incorporated with the arduino boards. The board includes a 10k ohm resistor, making the connection between the button and the arduino only needs a cable.

The first step is cut a piece of copper pcb the size of the design. Later cut the drilling template and place it in the copper pcb. This template marks the place where you have to make the holes for the components.

Now it's time to draw the tracks. I used a a sticker to mark the tracks. The next step is put the PCB in the acid and when done thoroughly clean the PCB. And the final step is solder the joystick and the resistor and put the decorative stickers.

The screw terminal blocks conections are:

GND ---> GND of arduino

Vin ------> 5V of arduino

X ------> The x-axis potentiometer to an analog pin of arduino(for example A0)

Y ------> The y-axis potentiometer to an analog pin of arduino(for example A1)

B ------> Connect the button to a digital pin of arduino.(For example D8)

Step 15: How to Use the 2.4GHz Modules?:

Picture of How to Use the 2.4GHz Modules?:

I use two nRF24L01 2.4GHz Radio/Wireless Transceivers to comunicate the two arduinos. The range of this modules are from 50 feet to 2000 feet distances. These 2.4 GHz Radio modules are based on the Nordic Semiconductor nRF24L01+ chip. The Nordic nRF24L01+ integrates a complete 2.4GHz RF transceiver, RF synthesizer, and baseband logic including the Enhanced ShockBurst hardware protocol accelerator supporting a high-speed SPI interface. These low-power short-range modude have a built-in Antenna.

These transcevers use the 2.4 GHz unlicensed band like many WiFi routers, some cordless phones etc.These module send and receive data in 'packets' of several bytes at a time. There is built-in error correction and resending, and it is possible to have one unit communicate with up to 6 other similar units at the same time. The pinout as shown in diagram tha you can see in the photos and a table with the coneections to diferent models of arduinos.

*IMPORTANT* :These modules VCC connection must go to 3.3V not 5.0V

I will show an example of transmit and receive software below for one joystick:

Transmiter:

<p>/* <br>- WHAT IT DOES: Reads Analog values on A0, A1 and transmits
them over a nRF24L01 Radio Link to another transceiver.
1 - GND
2 - VCC 3.3V !!! NOT 5V
3 - CE to Arduino pin 9
4 - CSN to Arduino pin 10
5 - SCK to Arduino pin 13
6 - MOSI to Arduino pin 11
7 - MISO to Arduino pin 12
8 - UNUSED
- Analog Joystick:</p><p>GND to Arduino GND<br>VCC to Arduino +5V
X Pot to Arduino A0
Y Pot to Arduino A1
*/
/*-----( Import needed libraries )-----*/
#include <SPI.h></p><p>#include <nRF24L01.h></p><p>#include <RF24.h></p><p>/*-----( Declare Constants and Pin Numbers )-----*/<br>#define CE_PIN 9
#define CSN_PIN 10
#define JOYSTICK_X A0
#define JOYSTICK_Y A1</p><p>
// NOTE: the "LL" at the end of the constant is "LongLong" type
const uint64_t pipe = 0xE8E8F0F0E1LL; // Define the transmit pipe
<br></p><p>/*-----( Declare objects )-----*/
RF24 radio(CE_PIN, CSN_PIN); // Create a Radio
/*-----( Declare Variables )-----*/
int joystick[2]; // 2 element array holding Joystick readings</p><p>
void setup() /****** SETUP: RUNS ONCE ******/
{
     Serial.begin(9600);
     radio.begin();
      radio.openWritingPipe(pipe);
}//--(end setup )---
void loop() /****** LOOP: RUNS CONSTANTLY ******/
{
       joystick[0] = analogRead(JOYSTICK_X);
       joystick[1] = analogRead(JOYSTICK_Y);
       radio.write( joystick, sizeof(joystick) );
}//--(end main loop )--</p>

Receiver:

<p>/*<br>- WHAT IT DOES: Receives data from another transceiver with
2 Analog values from a Joystick
Displays received values on Serial Monitor
1 - GND
2 - VCC 3.3V !!! NOT 5V
3 - CE to Arduino pin 9
4 - CSN to Arduino pin 10
5 - SCK to Arduino pin 13
6 - MOSI to Arduino pin 11
7 - MISO to Arduino pin 12
8 - UNUSED</p><p>
/*-----( Import needed libraries )-----*/
#include <SPI.h></p><p>#include <nRF24L01.h></p><p>#include <RF24.h></p><p>/*-----( Declare Constants and Pin Numbers )-----*/<br>#define CE_PIN 9
#define CSN_PIN 10</p><p>
// NOTE: the "LL" at the end of the constant is "LongLong" type
const uint64_t pipe = 0xE8E8F0F0E1LL; // Define the transmit pipe</p><p>
/*-----( Declare objects )-----*/
RF24 radio(CE_PIN, CSN_PIN); // Create a Radio</p><p>
/*-----( Declare Variables )-----*/
int joystick[2]; // 2 element array holding Joystick readings</p><p>
void setup() /****** SETUP: RUNS ONCE ******/
{
    Serial.begin(9600);
    delay(1000);
    Serial.println("Nrf24L01 Receiver Starting");
    radio.begin();
    radio.openReadingPipe(1,pipe);
    radio.startListening();;
}//--(end setup )---</p><p>
void loop() /****** LOOP: RUNS CONSTANTLY ******/
{
   if ( radio.available() )
   { // Read the data payload until we've received everything
       bool done = false;
      while (!done)
      { // Fetch the data payload
           done = radio.read( joystick, sizeof(joystick) );
          Serial.print("X = ");
          Serial.print(joystick[0]);
          Serial.print(" Y = ");
          Serial.println(joystick[1]);
      }
  }
  else </p><p>  { </p><p>       Serial.println("No radio available");
  }
}//--(end main loop )---</p>

Step 16: Connecting the Joystick and the Linear Potentiometer:

Picture of Connecting the Joystick and the Linear Potentiometer:

To make the prototype of the controller I use a breadboard to connect everything. I have attached the boards of the joysticks and the linear potentiometer elastic bands jaja. I first thought of making a prototype with all elements before modifying a PS2 controller adding them the accelerometer, linear potentiometer, etc..

Simply connect the x,y GND and Vin terminals of both joystick to de 5v, GND, A0 and A1 pins of arduino. And the linear pot in the same way.

Step 17: How to Use the MMA7361 Accelerometer?:

Picture of How to Use the MMA7361 Accelerometer?:

It's a breakout board for Freescale’s MMA7361L three-axis analog MEMS accelerometer. The sensor requires a very low amount of power and has a g-select input which switches the accelerometer between ±1.5g and ±6g measurement ranges. Other features include a sleep mode, signal conditioning, a 1-pole low pass filter, temperature compensation, self test, and 0g-detect which detects linear freefall. Zero-g offset and sensitivity are factory set and require no external devices.

It's specifications are:

  • Supports 2.2V ~ 3.6V or 5V voltage input.
  • Two selectable measuring ranges (±1.5g, ±6g)
  • Breadboard friendly - 0.1" pitch header
  • Low current consumption: 400 µA
  • Sleep mode: 3 µA
  • Low voltage operation: 2.2 V - 3.6 V
  • High sensitivity (800 mV/g at 1.5g)
  • Fast turn on time (0.5 ms enable response time)
  • Self test for freefall detect diagnosis
  • 0g-Detect for freefall protection
  • Signal conditioning with low pass filter
  • Robust design, high shocks survivability

With the AcceleroMMA7361 library it's so easy to use this tiny module. The commands you can use with this library are:

  • void begin ()
  • void begin (int sleepPin, int selfTestPin, int zeroGPin, int gSelectPin, int xPin, int yPin, int zPin)
  • int getXRaw ()
    • getXRaw(): Returns the raw data from the X-axis analog I/O port of the Arduino as an integer
  • int getYRaw ()
    • getYRaw(): Returns the raw data from the Y-axis analog I/O port of the Arduino as an integer
  • int getZRaw ()
    • getZRaw(): Returns the raw data from the Z-axis analog I/O port of the Arduino as an integer
  • int getXVolt ()
    • getXVolt(): Returns the voltage in mV from the X-axis analog I/O port of the Arduino as a integer
  • int getYVolt ()
    • getYVolt(): Returns the voltage in mV from the Y-axis analog I/O port of the Arduino as a integer
  • int getZVolt ()
    • getZVolt(): Returns the voltage in mV from the Z-axis analog I/O port of the Arduino as a integer
  • int getXAccel ()
    • getXAccel(): Returns the acceleration of the X-axis as a int (1 G = 100.00)
  • int getYAccel ()
    • getYAccel(): Returns the acceleration of the Y-axis as a int (1 G = 100.00)
  • int getZAccel ()
    • getZAccel(): Returns the acceleration of the Z-axis as a int (1 G = 100.00)
  • void getAccelXYZ (int _XAxis, int _YAxis, int _ZAxis)
    • getAccelXYZ(int _XAxis, int _YAxis, int _ZAxis) returns all axis at once as pointers
  • int getTotalVector ()
    • getTotalVector returns the magnitude of the total acceleration vector as an integer
  • void setOffSets (int xOffSet, int yOffSet, int zOffSet)
  • void calibrate ()
  • void setARefVoltage (double _refV)
  • void setAveraging (int avg)
    • setAveraging(int avg): Sets how many samples have to be averaged in getAccel default is 10.
  • int getOrientation ()
  • void setSensitivity (boolean sensi)
    • setSensitivity sets the sensitivity to +/-1.5 G (HIGH) or +/-6 G (LOW) using a boolean HIGH (1.5 G) or LOW (6 G)
  • void sleep ()
    • sleep lets the device sleep (when device is sleeping already this does nothing)
  • void wake ()
    • wake enables the device after sleep (when device is not sleeping this does nothing) there is a 2 ms delay, due to enable response time (datasheet: typ 0.5 ms, max 2 ms)

The library have 3 simple examples. One gets the accelerations in each axis, the second gets the angle and the third the voltage. I used the "RawData" to get the angle of each axis othe controller to control the inclination:

<p>#include <AcceleroMMA7361.h></p><p>AcceleroMMA7361 accelero;
int x;
int y;
int z;
void setup()
{
    Serial.begin(9600);
    accelero.begin(8, 7, 6, 5, A5, A6, A7);
    accelero.setSensitivity(HIGH);//sets the sensitivity to +/-6G
    accelero.calibrate();
}</p><p>
void loop()
{
    x = accelero.getXRaw();
    y = accelero.getYRaw();
    z = accelero.getZRaw();
   Serial.print("\nx: ");
   Serial.print(x);
   Serial.print("\ty: ");
   Serial.print(y);
   Serial.print("\tz: ");
   Serial.print(z);
   delay(500); //(make it readable)
}</p>

Step 18: Put All Together:

Picture of Put All Together:

All that remains is to place the accelerometer on the remote controller and connect it to the arduino nano as in the previous step.

Now it's time to program!!!

Step 19: Programming the Remote Controller:

Picture of Programming the Remote Controller:

Using all prior learning of each module only need to adapt the programs to the characteristics of the remote control by linking in two programs: one for the arduino remote control works as a transmitter and another program for arduino hexapod operates as a receiver.

According to the motion limits of the servos, that I got from my previous instructable, you must use the map command arduino to convert the values of the potentiometers and the accelerometer within the minimum limit range values of motion of the servos. Being as follows:

<p>values[0] = map(values[0], 23, 1000, 900, 1500); //Value from slider pot<br>values[1] = map(values[1], 23, 1000, 2100, 1540); //Value from slider pot
values[3] = map(values[3], 1, 1033, -295, 295); //Value from y-axis of right joystick
values[4] = map(values[4], 1, 1023, -295, 295); //Value from y-axis of left joystick
values[5] = map(values[5], 1, 1023, -360, 360); //Value from x-axis of left joystick
values[6] = map(values[6], 170, 500, -360, 360); //Value from x-axis of the accelerometer
values[7] = map(values[7], 170, 510, -360, 360); //Value from y-axis of the accelerometer</p>

Using one of the buttons on one of the joysticks I wanted to use the example shown on arduino page that consists in counting the number of times that a button is pressed to create various modes in which the hexapod will move.
http://arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/ButtonStateChange

<p>/* State change detection (edge detection)<br>This example shows how to detect when a button or button changes from off to on
and on to off.
*/
// this constant won't change:
const int buttonPin = 2; // the pin that the pushbutton is attached to
const int ledPin = 13; // the pin that the LED is attached to</p><p>// Variables will change:
int buttonPushCounter = 0; // counter for the number of button presses
int buttonState = 0; // current state of the button
int lastButtonState = 0; // previous state of the button</p><p>void setup() {
   // initialize the button pin as a input:
   pinMode(buttonPin, INPUT);
   // initialize the LED as an output:
   pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
   // initialize serial communication:
   Serial.begin(9600);
}</p><p>void loop() {
   // read the pushbutton input pin:
   buttonState = digitalRead(buttonPin);
   // compare the buttonState to its previous state
   if (buttonState != lastButtonState) {
   // if the state has changed, increment the counter
   if (buttonState == HIGH) {
   // if the current state is HIGH then the button
   // wend from off to on:
   buttonPushCounter++;
   Serial.println("on");
   Serial.print("number of button pushes: ");
   Serial.println(buttonPushCounter);
}
else {
   // if the current state is LOW then the button
   // wend from on to off:
   Serial.println("off");
 }
}
// save the current state as the last state,
//for next time through the loop
lastButtonState = buttonState;
// turns on the LED every four button pushes by
// checking the modulo of the button push counter.
// the modulo function gives you the remainder of
// the division of two numbers:
if (buttonPushCounter % 4 == 0) {
digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
  } else {
   digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
  }
}</p>

I convert this example and adapt to my sketchs of the remote controller and to the receptor. So
So I create three modes of movements:

  • The first one allows the linear potentiometer and joysticks move the hexapod
  • The second allows joysticks, the potentiometer and accelerometer move the hexapod
  • And the last mode let move hte hexapod walk, walk backwards,etc moving the two joystick simultaneously

Comments

JeromeS29 (author)2016-12-15

where are the pattern files?

ERROR SANS1 (author)JeromeS292017-02-22

zactle

wait wait wait.Wheres the code?

Technovation (author)2016-05-24

How did you link torobot to arduino?

terezatacic (author)2015-10-28

Hey Im not sure if your still willing to update this instructable at all.. But I was wondering if you could please add some more details about the chassis.

For example, which piece is A,B,C, ect. How do they all fit together? I know that there are photos, but they're not very clear due to photo quality/all the black pieces.

Thank you!

sweetkurapika (author)2015-07-21

This is really wonderful,

I would like to translate your work into another language.

Can you please provide me with the PCB files of the eyes and the remote controller?

Here is my email [nihon.sahli@gmail.com]

Thank you very much in advance.

shadowamit (author)2015-07-16

bro can it produce same microsecond signal as a remote transmitter


ie

in company made transmitter the joystick channel varies from 1000-2000 micro second


can it produce like that...

shadowamit (author)2015-07-16

bro can it produce same microsecond pulse as in any other 6 channel remote..... ie when we shift the gear it runs from1000 to 2000 micro second...

icey.hood (author)2015-05-29

can i use a buck converter rather than the UBEC 8A/15A Voltage Regulator

Fabiand1 (author)2015-05-21

amigo me puedes mandar una guía del tamaño de las piezas y diagrama de flujos por favor le agradecería.

Fabiand1 (author)Fabiand12015-05-21

Mi correo fabianandres59@hotmail.com

kamhagh (author)2015-05-02

wy do you have to use a library? i read the 4 page datasheet and its extremly easy to use and understand!

Blasphemor (author)2015-04-22

hey, un proyecto alucinante. Me ha cautivado tanto que lo estoy haciendo. Y por ahí leí que ESPAÑOL, por eso escribo en español y no en ingles.

Estoy teniendo muchos problemas con el codigo final, será que me puedes enviar los archivos de arduino te lo agradecería infinitamente. [metalero_77@hotmail.com]

Gracias de antemano

Hexadrake rules !!!

RiyaVader (author)2015-04-20

Omg! It's amazing! *_*

bruno.guimaraes.940436 (author)2015-03-27

hello will be vque could send me only the CODIG servo motor movements . to email bruno.b_alberto@hotmail.com

WilliamM11 (author)2015-02-18

Hello, I really enjoyed reading about your project. I was hoping that I would be able to achieve some of the same things. I was hoping you could send me your body part dimensions to help guide me as I really enjoyed the look of your project.

Thank you!

Erick AlanM (author)2015-02-16

hi Deividmaxx
im new in this page and your project is amazing!!
i really love it.

i need to ask...

can you share your circuit and body parts templates?

i really want make my own hexapod and your design is great for free time project.

thanks for your post and congrats!!

shawal (author)2015-01-28

nice work =D if possible please send your code in sharifshawal@yahoo.com

Mr AbAk (author)2015-01-13

Nice Ible

Build_it_Bob (author)2014-12-12

That is crazy ! I love it ...amazing work !

I'm shaking my head ....excellent !

Build_it_Bob

Arya42 (author)2014-06-20

What kind of wooden board was used? It looks like particle board but it is difficult to tell.

abuchard (author)2014-06-18

bonjour

je voudrais savoir si tu pouvais mettre un lien pour le code arduino

ElectricBlue123 (author)2014-06-14

first EPIC! 2ed can it be trend into a defends bot / small alltetran velical ? ( sorry for spelling ) ?

Arya42 (author)2014-05-31

What kind of electrolytic capacitors and slide switch are on the eye control board? They don't seem to be in the parts list.

RoboTable (author)2014-05-23

I feel this instructable really captures the ethos of this site. You managed to put together this really intricate machine with hand-cut wood, no need for 3-d printing or cnc cutters, just good old DIY'ing. Not to say those are bad, because they are awesome, just the spirit of those on the cheap builds really moves me. You really deserve this, I was rooting for you from the beginning, and am so glad you won. Keep on building! You Rock!

Deividmaxx (author)RoboTable2014-05-29

Thank you :)))

Arya42 (author)2014-05-28

I am getting the exact same servos as what you used but I am having difficulty with making the templates. Do you have dimensions or AutoCAD files?

phenoptix (author)2014-05-20

Well deserved win!

BikeHacker (author)2014-04-30

Has your cat attacked it yet? (;

Deividmaxx (author)BikeHacker2014-05-01

Not yet. :) jaja

BikeHacker (author)2014-04-30

Very nice. You could also add a camera to it!

Deividmaxx (author)BikeHacker2014-05-01

Thanks you. I had not thought about adding a camera but I think it would be a bit tricky due to the small size and limited space of the hexapod haha.

edugimeno (author)2014-04-25

Y Español!! Orgullo patrio. Si señor. Good job. Amazing project. Very nice finish. I wish I had more free time to build this. And you also invested time in a pretty nice storage box, awesome!!

Deividmaxx (author)edugimeno2014-04-27

Siii jajaaj. Gracias

apburner (author)2014-04-24

Congrats on the HackADay.com write up. Good work on your hexapod. I might have to fire up my scollsaw and build this thing.

Deividmaxx (author)apburner2014-04-27

Thank you :)

apburner (author)2014-04-24

Congrats on the HackADay.com write up. Good work on your hexapod. I might have to fire up my scollsaw and build this thing. You wouldn't happen to be adding a third dimention to these legs are you. I think maybe a standard size servo would be able to handle the up and down movement of these legs.

Deividmaxx (author)2014-04-13

I upload a new video :)

techsdata (author)2014-04-06

Hello excellent job of hexapod, be so kind as to send hexapod design to my email. techsdata@hotmail.com, thank you very much .. the greetings.

thanks

gweeds (author)2014-04-06

Dude, good work on doing all this by hand ie No laser cutting or CNC'ing, The red edging on the black legs instantly drew me to this. Awesome work!

achand8 (author)2014-04-05

Please upload a video of it in action!

lokoo (author)achand82014-04-06
epierce (author)2014-04-05

I like to see somebody not using a CNC machine and taking pleasure in their work!! Well done!!

deonjwessels (author)2014-04-04

Fantastic project. Any chance that you could post the actual autocad file as I would like to cut the parts on my cnc router. Thank you.

Deividmaxx (author)deonjwessels2014-04-05

The CAD file is only for reference. The parts are not drawn with the real measurements of the paper patterns, that are the originals.

eric.atkinson (author)2014-04-01

This is an excellent project. Would you mind posting the CAD files for those with LASER cutters? I would like to build several with my engineering class.

mad_mat (author)eric.atkinson2014-04-04

Hey eric, maybe David could benefit from your LASER cutter?

eric.atkinson (author)mad_mat2014-04-04

Absolutely. I would happily cut him a set of parts for the files.

Deividmaxx (author)eric.atkinson2014-04-05

The CAD file is only for reference. The parts are not drawn with the real measurements of the paper patterns, that are the originals.

wfoster6 (author)2014-04-04

amazing!!! this robot is just the greatest. I triple voted for you.

I love the fact that you used only 9g servos that really is quite remarkable

please consider posting this robot on letsmakerobots.

http://letsmakerobots.com/

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