Introduction: DIY Pouring Aid

Pouring hot water can be a very hard and dangerous if you’re differently abled. A friend asked for help, so she could prepare her own cup of tea at home, without spilling and burning herself again.

With this contraption you can safely pour hot water by tilting. We made this contraption big enough to accommodate 17cm diameter kettles.

Materials

  • Wood+varnish or ‘water resistant material’ (we used 1cm thick HKC, a plastic-wood combo, no need to varnish)
  • Glue
  • Screws, small
  • Velcro

Tools

  • Saw
  • Screwdriver
  • Sandpaper

Could use optimalization:

  • Curve of the the pouring device
  • Anti-slip material on underside 'legs'
  • System to keep the water kettle in place (now velcro)

Designed by Rene Grottendieck
Made by Herman Kopinga, Rene Grottendieck and David Bakker

Step 1: ​Measure Your Kettle and Draw Parts

Measure your kettle

Quite important to measure your kettle diameter to know the required size of the pouring aid.

Draw out parts

In our case we drew out

  • 2x 25cm by 6cm ‘legs’ with a nice curve
  • 2x 17.5cm by 6cm parts for the platform
  • 1x 17.5 by 3cm part for the buffer

Especially take care to make the platform big enough to accommodate your kettle.

Step 2: ​Saw and Sand Down

Saw out the parts, stick the two legs together with dual sided tape and sand them down so they are almost exactly equal.

Step 3: ​Glue & Screw

Glue and screw the parts together as shown in the pictures. Use a glue that works with your material and pre drill for the screws.

Step 4: ​Add a Locking Mechanism

To keep the kettle in place we attached two pieces of velcro to the platform. Perhaps a piece of bungie cord would work even better, or something else ingenious.

Comments

author
_Sjeu_ (author)2015-07-02

This is really great! Thanx to the pouring aid, I am more self-reliant in my home. Now I can use it to fill pitchers and make tea in my thermos. This might even result in less visits of home care. For me this is also more freedom :-)

Added some felt caps for sliding it smoothly over the countertop and also added anti slip material (Dycem) to give it more grip while pouring.

The pouring aid works well because I only need little strenght and I can also use it with just one hand. Here's a demo of how it works for me in a video (in dutch):

My hope is that this assistive aid will help a lot of other people too :-)

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About This Instructable

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Bio: Founder maker space 'maakplek' Groningen, The Netherlands. Like to visit Maker Faires and travel.
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