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What is a Sous-Vide cooker you may ask, it is a method of cooking food in a bag in a hot water bath, the principle is it holds the food you want to cook at the temperature you want it to be when you finish cooking. So the food never becomes over cooked and stays moist. It is particularly good for cooking tough cuts of meat to break down the collagen connective tissue. Or if you want to cook a rare steak you can hold it at the temperature of rare (125-130 °F) and never have it over cooked but still above the temperature for bacteria to grow.

Step 1: How to Make Your Own Sous-Vide Cooker

In this video I show how I was able to make a simple sous vide cooker from a few parts. See the video for the process.

The parts you will need are:

  • Temperature Controller (ebay)
  • Slow cooker/crockpot (analog)
  • 110v Wall Receptacle
  • Electrical Box and Cover
  • Common lamp wire
  • Handtools
  • Food safe Ziplock bags or vacuum food saver

For the slow cooker you want to make sure that you are using one that is analog, meaning when you unplug it it does not reset and turn itself off. Digital ones reset themselves when you unplug them, they do that with relays and timers, you want one that has manual knobs. Basically get a cheap one, you can find loads of them at the thrift shops.

Total investment around 20 dollars. Search on ebay for "Temperature controller" lots of them will come up in the search. This model is the 110V rated for 10A.

Step 2: Sous-Vide Cooking a Flank Steak

In this video I did a test to cook a tough piece of flank steak with my home made sous-vide cooker. It turned out great!

Check out my website too:http://eclectic-workshop.weebly.com/

crazy cool man
<p>This became a favorite so fast! The tip about using the eBay temperature controller just trimmed a week off my sous vide project. I had been planning to program up an Arduino, 16x2 LCD screen, buttons and a waterproof thermometer. And here I can just pay $15 and get a unit designed for that with all the buttons and a finished look. Wow.</p><p>I had assumed these industrial controllers were prohibitively expensive so I never considered them for a personal project but after I calculate the cost of all my own supplies it's a wash.</p><p>Have you noticed any issues with letting the temperature probe rest on the bottom of the cooker?</p><p>Thank you so much for making this Instructable.</p>
<p>Great to hear this was a help. I try to always make sure the temperature probe does not touch the side or bottom of the cooker, as those are spots where the heating element could be. Other than that no issues and I have have done a few long cooks and it has been awesome. Keep in mind the temperature accuracy with these controllers are +/- 1 degree where as the expensive sous vide machines are more accurate but hey can't beat the price and simplicity. Next I'm looking for a bigger slow cooker or making my own cooking vessel with a hotwater element and pot.</p>
<p>I have seen people cut off the end of a stainless steel whisk and suspend the probe inside between the tines so it can't touch anything. I'm glad to hear your oven is working as well as you had hoped and that makes me excited to complete my build.</p>
<p>That's a great idea with the whisk!</p>

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Bio: http://www.youtube.com/c/AndrewWorkshop
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