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In my room I have always had an abundance of jackets and coats as I am always cold. I recently noticed with all my big coats, I had no where to hang them, this was a brilliant project for me to take on as it would create larger storage space for my always organised room. I wanted to make my project minimalist yet stylish so the design of this diamond was perfect. It was functional yet fit my style of room. DIY also was going to bring another element of school identity to my room, especially as when I was younger I loved DIY, I lost my passion for it over the years so I was particularly happy to take on a project I would actually use. I will make my coat hanger out of aluminium and create it with no sharp edges so it is perfectly filed and cut with my junior hack saw, along my indented lines I created with my scriber. I am excited for the final outcome of this project as it will be of great usage.

Step 1: Making the Paper Model

Before you create the real thing in metal, you have to be able to create a model out of paper (a net) to avoid mistakes on the metal (waste of material) and to have an actual plan of what you need to do. Like any other project there has to be a start:

STEP 1

To start with we are going to have to have hold of:

  • A piece of paper
  • A pair of scissors
  • A pencil
  • A ruler

STEP 2

Mark out the lines of your piece of paper using to ur pencil and ruler referring to the information on your worksheet. For fold lines create dotted lines, for cut lines make harsh straight lines.

STEP 3

Now it is time to make a decision, based personally on self judgement, you must check your drawing and your measurements, once you are sure they are to scale and there is nothing you could possibly do to make it more accurate, you can move onto step 4, if there is something you could do go back to step 2.

STEP 4

Cut along the lines using your scissors

STEP 5

Fold along to dotted fold line. After this step is complete you must evaluate your paper model/net and decide if it is to scale and there is nothing you would to make better you are done.

Step 2: Preparing the Metal

After your paper model is completed and you are pleased with your final outcome of measurements and etc. It is time to prepare your metal of choice (I used Aluminium as it is easy to shape). When you are certain there is absolutely nothing you could do to improve your paper model to avoid a mistake on metal (wasted of material), you can move onto step one.

STEP 1

Make sure you have the following items:

  • A piece of metal
  • A flat file
  • Emery cloth

STEP 2

What you need to do next is place you metal securely into a vice with a side of the metal exposed but not too exposed as it will lead to the metal bending and making horrible noises while being filed. To file the corners what you must do is turn so your body is facing the metal and use the file in a backwards and forwards diagonal direction. Make sure to do all the sides until they are completely smooth and you can run your finger across the edges without meeting a rough edge.

STEP 3

When you are sure all your metal is completely filed, check if there is anything you could do to make the edges smoother, if there is, go back a step, if there isn't, continue with this step. You must now remove your metal from the vice and place it on a flat surface. Now you must use your Emery cloth to get rid of the dirty layer of rough unfinished metal on top. Use your Emery cloth in a backwards and forwards motion (like sandpaper) until your surface is far shinier and smoother. Do not worry about scratch marks on the metal at first from the emery cloth, as the more you use the emery cloth on the metal, the more scratches that will go away to reveal a shiny new layer.

Step 3: Making the Coat Hook in Metal

After the paper net is completed, you have prepared your metal and it all looks accurate you must go on to creating the net in aluminium metal. It is important that minimal to no mistakes are made on this copy or the material must go to waste.

STEP 1

Make sure you have to following equipment on hand with you while you work:

  • Sheet of metal
  • Steel Rule
  • Pencil
  • Scriber
  • Rubber

STEP 2

Mark out the net onto the metal first in pencil and then with the scriber along the lines using the steel rule.

STEP 3

Now it is tine to make a decision, rub out your pencil lines and check if you can see the marks you made with the scriber and if they are accurate and to scale in measurements and scale. If there is nothing that could be improved go on to step 4, if there is something go back to step 2.

Step 4: Cutting Out the Coat Hook in Metal

When you finish marking out your net onto the metal with the scriber and you are perfectly happy with the measurements are there is nothing you could possibly do to improve the accuracy of it, then you may continue with these steps to cutting out the coat hook into metal.

STEP 1

When cutting out the coat hook in metal, you need very few tools on hand:

  • A Junior hack saw
  • Emery cloth
  • A flat file

STEP 2

Put your metal with your net marked out on it in the vice with your lines to be cut lined up with the edge of the vice. Now create a groove in your metal at the top of where you want to cut by pulling the saw back a few times. Once there is a prominent groove at the top of the metal you want to cut, you may now saw in a backwards and forwards straight motion using the technique of pointing your index finger along the saw to manipulate the arm to saw in a complete straight line to avoid curves in the cutting of the metal.

STEP 3

At this step you must decide whether your edges are cut accurately, if they are not you may go back to step 2 and cut more to make it more accurate, when you are sure that Once all your lines intended for cutting are all cut out you must now grab your flat file and file away the sharp edges of it using the same technique that was used in preparing your metal. Once all the edges are completely filed, you must now wrap your emery cloth around the tip of the file and once again file the edges but with the emery cloth wrapped around, you needn't do this for long.

Step 5: Bending the Edges of Your Coat Hook in Metal

Once you have completely finished step 4 in all it's aspects, you may now move onto this step. Step 5 will tell you how to bend the edges of your coat hook and you to create the small hole in the middle which will be the joiner of this coat hook, these steps will be the ones that will pull your design together and bring it to life.

STEP 1

You must make sure you have the following items on hand:

  • Centre punch
  • Anvil/Energy absorber
  • Folding bars
  • A Hammer
  • A pencil
  • Pillar drill with drill bit

STEP 2

Now you may use a pencil to draw a small dot where you will create a hole in the square that is unexposed or un cut. Once you are perfectly satisfied with the area of your pencilled dot you may take you piece of metal over to an anvil. Line up your centre punch with your pencilled dot and use you hammer to hit down on it to create a dent in the metal where you marked out your pencilled dot, it won't make a horrible noise as the anvil will absorb the energy.

STEP 3

Take your work over to your pillar drill and place in the correct drill bit. Making sure your drill bit is perfectly lined up with your indent turn on the drill and lower the drill into the metal until it goes right through.

STEP 4

Now you must place your metal in the vice with the folding bars in the middle of it and place you work with your fold lines horizontally in line with the top of the folding bars. Use your hammer to hit at the base until the piece of metal you are intending to be folded over is fully folded over. Repeat this step on the other side that must be bent. When they are finally both bent check if they are fully inlined, if not repeat this step but more accurately.

Step 6: Plastic Dip Coating for Your Metal Coat Hook.

15-20 mins max at 400 degrees C In oven.

fLuidiser plastic powder. dip in near to surface to avoid lumping.

Powder melts on metal into nooks and crannys.

Once step 5 is completed you must make the decision whether it is completely to scale and there is nothing that could be done to improve. Once you are sure, you may move onto this step. This step will teach you how to plastic dip coat your metal coat hook.

STEP 1

Make sure you have the following machinery and tools on hand

  • An Oven
  • A Fluidiser
  • Your Coat hook
  • Pliers
  • Plastic Powder

STEP 2

Set your oven to 400 degrees Celsius and place your coat hook in it for 15-20 minutes depending on your metal.

STEP 3

After 20 minutes maximum at this heat take your metal out of the oven using pliers to make sure you don't injure yourself with the intense heat. With your pliers take your coat hook over to the fluidiser and put your plastic powder in it and turn it on.

STEP 4

Keep hold on your pliers which should still have your coat hook attached place it in the fluidised but close to the surface to prevent to plastic powder clogging. Leave it in till fully coated (The Plastic powder is blown around so it fills every nook and cranny). Take it out when fully coated.

STEP 5

Leave it to dry till it is completely cool.

Step 7: Making the The Wood Base

Welcome to the second part of your Coat hook, you are nearing the finished final product now. In this part you will be learning how to build the base on which you will place your wooden dowels and coat hooks previously made. To make the base you will be using two different types of wood to create a lap joint. A lap joint is a very strong joint created by taking an equal amount of wood away from each piece of wood.

STEP 1

For this step you will need:

  • Two pieces of wood
  • `A Tenon saw
  • A Tri Square
  • A steel rule
  • A marking gage
  • A Band saw
  • A pencil
  • Disc Sander
  • A Chisel
  • A Wooden Mallet
  • PVA Glue
  • A G Clamp

STEP 2

First of all what you will need to do is you will need to find the half way point of one of your pieces of wood using your steel rule, to draw the line, line up your tri square to create a perfect 180 degree line square with the edge of your wood and draw a line against it. Use your pencil to draw 'waste lines' on one of the halves. Do the opposite side on the other piece of wood.

STEP 3

Next you must measure the width of the edge of one of your pieces of wood with your steel rule and set your marking gage to half of that measurement. If your marking gage is slightly off the measure meant you may tap it on your workshop bench, on it's head to shorten the measurement, on the bottom to increase the measurement. Once set perfectly lean the needle against the edge of the piece of wood and lock the piece in the wood. Use the needle in a leaning dragging down motion to create a scratch down the middle. Stop when you reach in line with the pencil line you created earlier. Use your pencil to draw waste lines along this new piece. Do the same on the other piece of wood.

STEP 4

Now you must use your tenon saw to saw along the most shallow line along the face of the wood. Saw down to half way where you drew a line earlier. The correct motion for using a tenon saw is to keep your arm square while holding the saw pointing your index finger forward. Do the same on the other piece of wood.

STEP 5

Now you must use your band saw to cut the deep line on the edge. Lock in the gage at the correct measurements according to your piece of wood. Use your left hand to press the wood against the vice and your right hand to slow push the end of the wood towards the band saw. Turn it on and keep pushing till it reaches the end. Make sure to set the machine to the right level (on our machine the power was on '2'), do the same on the other piece of wood.

STEP 6

Line your pieces of wood up against each other to see if they slot and fit in well. If there is a gap where they won't fit together you must use a disc sander to sand down the ends to the measurements they need to be shortened by. If needed use a chisel and wooden mallet while clamping down your pieces with the G clamp. Chisel off the pieces necessary. Do the same on the other piece of wood.

STEP 7

Use PVA Glue on one side of one of the lap joints and joint them together like a jigsaw. Clamp it with a G clamp and wait for it to set. Clean up the sides where glue may have seeped through with a damp paper towel.

Step 8: Making the Lap Joint Stronger

For this step we will be making the lap joint stronger that it already is. We will do this by adding in wooden dowels and filling in any gaps that may exist in the joint. We will also be smoothing our surfaces by sanding.

STEP 1

For this step what you will need is:

  • A Steel Rule
  • A tri square
  • A pillar drill
  • PVA Glue
  • A wooden hammer
  • Wooden Dowels
  • A Sanding block
  • Sanding paper
  • Goggles
  • A Nokogiri saw
  • A Pencil
  • Saw Dust
  • A band saw

STEP 2

For this step we will be measuring out where you will draw out the precise measurements for where to place your dowels. Measure the gap between where your lap joint meets, mine was 67mm. Find the halfway point and draw a line around your piece of wood using your tri square to create the correct 90 degree angles. Divide this line up into 3 parts using a steel rule and draw a little X mark on the two parts near the half way point.

STEP 3

For this step we will be using the pillar drill. Remember to use goggles then place your wood into the vice and make sure the correct drill bit is inserted into the chuck of the pillar drill. Next turn the drill on and using the wheel bring the drill down onto the X mark and drill slightly and lift back up to release excess material, continue until you have drilled through both the X marks.

STEP 4

You must now apply a small amount of PVA glue and place the head of the dowel by the hole that you have recently created, use your wooden hammer to hammer in the dowels, it is fine to have the dowel be too long for the hole, repeat on other side.

STEP 5

Now place your piece of wood in a vice and use your nokogiri saw to cut off the excess dowel. The technique for using this is to hold it right against the wood and use normal sawing motions. Repeat on both sides then sand of any excess using your sanding block and sanding paper.

STEP 6

This step is optional depending on how big the gaps were in your lap joint, if there are big gaps or unwanted gaps gather up saw dust and place some PVA glue into the gap. Gather up saw dust and compress it into the glue until it makes its way into the gaps. Once completely filled and dried you may sand of the excess suck to the outside of your wood using the band sander.

Step 9: Finishing the Wooden Joint

In this step we will be finishing the wood and preparing our wood for the pegs we will put on the longer part of our wooden joint. After this step we will be nearing the end of our project.

STEP 1

For this step we will need:

  • Danish Oil
  • A long wooden peg
  • Paper towels
  • A pencil
  • A tri square
  • A steel rule
  • A pillar drill
  • A sanding block
  • Sanding paper

STEP 2

After sanding off the reminisce of PVA hue mixed with saw dust you should have a clean filled smooth piece of wood. There should't be any gaps now. You must now wrap your hand in tissue paper and pour on some danish oil onto the palm of your papered hand and rub two layers of the Danish oil onto each side. Make sure it is dry before going onto the next step.

STEP 3

After making sure the piece is completely dry find the midway point of the long side of the joint of the front facing side of which we will place of pegs on. Use your steel rule and tri square to measure length of the longer side and divide it into three cross-sections, do the same across the way and place two small crosses on the two lines closest to centre using your pencil making sure it doesn't interfere on the small scntre square where the two sides of the joint meet.

STEP 4

Turn on your pillar drill and tighten your piece of wood in a vice. Bring down the drill bit using the hand feed lever bring the drill bit down onto where you have placed your small crosses. Repeat the same thing on the other cross. Make sure to set the guard to the correct amount and use the correct size of drill bit.

STEP 5

Using your sanding block and paper sand off the remaining pencil lines from drawing your cross section for your drill to drill through. After this redo the oiling process you did in step 2. Allow it to dry

Step 10: Cutting the Wooden Pegs

For this step we will be adding finishing touches to finish our project. We will be adding on the pegs and screwing on our diamond coat hook previously made.

STEP 1

  • For this step we will need
  • A steel rule
  • A tri square
  • A long wooden cylinder (or other material you wish to make pegs out of)
  • Danish finishing oil
  • Paper towels
  • A pencil
  • An electric screwdriver
  • Screws
  • A Band saw
  • PVA Glue
  • Sand Paper
  • Sanding block
  • Danish Oil
  • Paper

STEP 2

For this step we will be using the band saw to cut our wooden cylinder using the same technique as we used to cut our wood pieces. Set the guard to the correct measurement as this will determine what size your peg will come out and place pressure against the vice and using your left hand to clamp it and your right hand to push it forward to cut it.

STEP 3

Using the same technique as you used in the last step involving Danish oil and paper towels to apply two layers of the oil to finish the pegs. Place some PVA glue in the freshly drilled holes and once dried place the pegs in and allow them to dry until secure making sure no glues pills onto the face of the wood and that it stays in the hole.

STEP 4

On the smaller side find the halfway point of the length of your wooden piece using your steel rule to measure and your tri square and pencil to draw in the lines, do the same across the way and find where the two lines intercept. It should be in the very centre on the smaller side. Using your pencil draw a small X mark where it intersects if correct. Get rid of the rest of the pencil lines by sanding then reo-iling and drying or perhaps rubber depending on how efficient it appears on the wood.

STEP 5

Using your electoral screwdriver, screws and diamond shaped hook place the screw through the hook and using the electric screw driver drill in a piolet hole using a small drill bit, then screw down the hook using an electric screw driver using the correct size screws square onto the X mark created on the smaller side.

STEP 6

Make sure the screw is tightened fully and that the pegs are dried fully before cleaning up the face of the wood and making sure there are no glue or pencil markings on the face of it. Using your sanding block and paper sand along the gran avoiding the metal coat hook.

STEP 7

Using your Danish oil and paper towels and the same technique earlier used oil it back up and let it dry.

STEP 8

Enjoy your new coat hook!

<p>Looks really good!</p>

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