loading

This is the first intructable i have made so hope it works out for whoever tries it. Also if your going to put it someplace where it gets lots of sun, you might want to add a little support under the chain hanger, I had to because it's already 80* where I live and there was about a half inch of sag in the top. I added metal straps I had laying around off the bolts on the underside. Other than that it works great.

1" galvanized pipe 48" long threaded ($19.98)
1" galvanized pipe 24" long threaded ($15.38)
3, 1" floor flanges ($6.29)
26" water heater drip pan ($11.28)
24" water heater drip pan ($9.98)
3.5ft 3/32" vinyl wrapped cable ($1.08)
1/8" cable clamp sleeve ($1.48)
4, 1/4" x 1" carriage bolts ($0.48)
4, 1/4 x 3/4" bolts ($0.44)
8, 1/4 hex nuts ($0.48)
8, 1/4" lock washers ($1.20)
25ft, #2 zinc chain ($29)
2, Metal coat hangers
Total $96

Step 1: Basket

Tools needed, drill, 1/4" bit and wrenches to tighten bolts.

I placed one floor flange in the center of the 26" pan and traced the holes and flange for alignment. I used the bottom of the pan because the center mark is smaller. I then drilled the mounting holes for the flange (1/4" drill bit). I then flipped the pan over and dropped the 4, carriage bolts through the mounting holes and pressed them through the holes drilled in the pan. Hold the flange in place and take a second flange and put it over the bolts on the bottom of the flange and tighten a lock washer and nut on each bolt. I used carriage bolts on the pan because they are smooth and rounded on the tops so discs don't get dinged by the edges on hex bolts.

Step 2: Chain Hanger

Tools needed, drill, 1/4 inch drill bit and wrenches to tighten bolts. Using the top of the pan locate the center and drill the same way as the basket portion. Drop the 4 the bolts through the holes from the bottom. Hold them in place and put the last flange on the top and tighten down the nuts. If you have some washers laying around, I would put them on the bolts before you mount the flange, but you don't have to.

Step 3: Chains

Tools needed Wire cutters, bolt cutters or grinder, pliers, drill and 1/8 inch drill bit. So I hung 6 outer and 6 inner chains. They are spaced every 30 degrees.

I made a template for 60 degree intervals and marked each radius since there are 6 and 6.

The outer chains are placed at 11 inches on each radius. and are 25 inches long. For the inner chains I rotated the template 30 degrees then marked each radius. They are mounted 6 inches from the center on each radius. The chains are 22 inches.

Drill 2 holes about a 1/4 inch apart at the above measurements for the inner and outer chains. Cut the wire hangers 2.5 inch lengths or use zip ties. Fold the wire in half to look like a staple and push through the holes on the top pan.

After all the wires or zip ties are pushed through the bottom of the pan flip it over to mount the chains. Close the zip ties, or twist the wire around each chain. L

Step 4: Top Post.

Screw the 24" pipe into the chain hanger flange then thread the basket to the other set of threads.

Step 5: Secure the Chains

Flip the assembled basket over and all the chains will fall into place. I started by threading the cable through all the outer chains and smashed the clamp so there is approximately a 3" diameter ring to hold them in pace. Cut the excess cable for the inner rings.

Using the same process, secure the inner chains. I had approximately 1 1/4" of cable left over.

Step 6: Bottom Post

Screw in the bottom post and your ready to put the basket in the ground. If you decide to use an umbrella base, you will have to cut the bottom post to the height you want.

The yellow is the portion that will go into the ground or be cut off to be a total height of 55 inches. It is 31 inches from the basket.

Step 7: Paint and Final Prep

Paint is optional, but everything metal got a coat of paint for extra protection from the elements and looks. I also drilled drain holes in the basket.

<p>its a very well written instructable, and I'm sure it will be a useful addition to most homes. At the risk of sounding dumb, though, what is it for and what does it do?</p>
It catches discs (better designed frisbees) used for disc golf. It's kind of like golf but it uses discs
Never heard of disc golf. Could you maybe post a video or photo of the thingy in action as it appears there might be a fair few of us who are not in the know...
<p>http://www.pdga.com/introduction</p>
I tried to put a video but It say video coming soon
In action
<p>I changed it to a better picture. Thanks for the advise.</p>
<p>This is awesome! So informative and inovative! If you can get a better picture at the beginning, I'm sure that someone might feature this. </p>

About This Instructable

562views

19favorites

License:

Bio: I like to build stuff
More by rkunkel:Disc Golf Basket 
Add instructable to: