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This started out a a prop to fight the Army of Darkness but it kind of got away from me and now I am afraid to go out in public with it...

I guess I will just have to shoot the cubicle zombies in my office!!!!

I made it capable of firing up to 12 number 64 bands from each barrel. Possibly more but the trigger action gets really stiff by this point.

Both barrels are independent from one another and can be fired individually or both together.


Step 1: Pre Build

I used mainly scrap lumber and metal for this build

The stock is from a scrap piece of 2X6 about 16 inches long
The barrels are from an old wooden Ikea curtain rod about 1 inch thick.
The brass pieces are 1/2 inch wide hard brass from a previous project
The brass dowels are 1/8 inch bare brazing rod
The body and hand grip are from 1 inch wide pine slats or survey stakes
There is also a piece of 1/2 inch rigid copper water pipe

I used a belt sander for shaping the materials
The fastening of pieces are done with poly wood glue and clamping
hand sanders were used for shaping and finishing
I used a propane torch to anneal and solder the metal pieces
An electric drill was used to make all the holes including the odd shaped ones
Hand files were used to shape the holes in the wood and for metal shaping.

Colouring was done with Varathane wood stain and clearcoat
Black was accomplished but priming then painting the wood with aerosol cans.

Step 2: Make the Stock

I hand sketched a rough outline of how I wanted the stock to look onto a scrap piece of 2X6

The rough shape was cut using a crude saw then the shaping began.

Starting with 50 grit paper on hte belt sander, remove the material which does not look like the stock.

Change to 80 grit then continue sanding the stock to remove sanding marks from the 50 grit.

Change to 120 grit then continue smoothing the stock.

Hand sand with 320 grit. Total time to this point was about a half an hour.

Fill any imperfections with stainable wood filler, let dry then sand smooth

Stain the stock the desired shade and let sit for a couple of minuted then wipe off the excess stain. Set aside to dry

Once dry clear coat the stock and let dry.

The stock will be quite rough at this point as the clear coat will have hardened the fibers.

Hand sand with 320 grit the wipe clean and clear coat again. let dry.

The stock should be smooth and shiny when finished.

Step 3: Handgrip

The front hand grip is made from 3 pieces of pine slat glued together as shown.

I made it much longer than I needed so that I could cut it down to fit.

Lightly sand the inside surfaces then glue with poly wood glue.

Step 4: Barrels

The length of the barrels were selected by placing a #64 rubber band on the end and stretching it to its limit.

The limit was marked and the barrels were cut about 5 inches longer than the limit.

Both barrels were glued together using a 1/4 inch thick small wood spacer about 1 inch from the front and at the rear as shown.

I used a small aluminum shaft to keep the spacers in place

Once dry rough up the rear end of the barrels and apply wood filler to make a joining shape.

Sand the rear, round with the belt sander.

Step 5: Barrel Support

Glue 3 pieces of slats together so that the hand grip will fit snugly on the outside of it as shown.

This piece needs to be long enough to house the working action and not so long that it wrecks the look of the shotgun.

once it has dried, it needs to be shaped so that the hand grip is at a slight raising angle.

The rear piece needs to be rounded and shaped so that it will mate neatly with the small round oval of the stock.

Sand the hand grip to round off the edges.

Fill and sand any imperfections.

When you are satisfied with the shape, it needs to be glued to the barrels in the exact centerline leaving a little barrel over the rear for aesthetics

Step 6: Cut and Prime

Cut the elastic grooves into the barrels using a hacksaw and round file.

Make nice smooth edges to prevent elastic breakage.

Admire your handiwork then prime the assembly.

hang it to dry.

Meanwhile you can stain and finish the hand grip as you did the stock.

Step 7: The Butt

It appears that it wouldn't be Halloween without EVA foam...

Trace the rear of the stock onto some paper.

Make 2 equal shapes from EVA foam tiles.

Glue them together with foam safe adhesive.

Shape the end slightly concave with a razor knife, sand smooth.

Use a heat gun to give a final smooth finish.

Use contact cement to attach the rubber to the wood stock.

Step 8: Attach the Barrels

Fit the barrels to the stock and drill a small 1/8 inch hole on an angle as shown.

Using a small amount of poly wood glue between the two, use a wood screw to fasten the stock to the barrels.

Dry fit the hand grip and admire the creation.

Step 9: Make It Work

Cut and shape a rectangular hole between the barrels at the elastic limit point that was determined earlier.

Drill a 1/8 hole through both barrels at the center of the hole.

Drill a 1/8 hole through the front of the barrel support

drill a 1/4 inch hole through the rear of the barrel support about 1/2 way from the back and bottom

shape and drill 2 pieces of hard brass as shown to serve as the elastic retainers. one is about 1/4 of an inch longer than the other.

Using 4 small washers and a length of 1/8 inch brass rod place the retainers in the barrel.

Measure from the rear 1/4 inch hole to the retainers when they are all the way back as seen from the top.

Cut a length of copper pipe to this length.

Shape a small piece of hard brass to serve as the trigger.

Drill a 1/4 inch hole in the pipe at one end and solder the trigger to that end at perpendicular to the hole.

Solder a small piece of hard brass of copper to the other end and shape it into a half moon opposite side of the trigger as shown.

Dry fit it and file to adjust the length as needed. notch the back side of the trigger as shown

Disassemble and paint black.

Step 10: Assemble and Test

The elastic retainers are placed in their slot and a small section of 1/8 inch rod is used to hold them in place.

3 #64 elastics are placed on the front of the barrel support and a small section of 1/8 inch rod is fed through the centers to keep them in place.

2 of the elastics are stretched and looped over the bottoms of the retainers as shown

The trigger assembly is attached to the barrel support with a 1/4 inch brass rod.

The third elastic is twisted once then stretched over the trigger to the notches

The hand grip is then glued into place.

All of the brass rods are just held in place by friction, that way if one breaks it can be easily replaced.

Step 11: Trigger Guard

Begin my annealing the metal to make it easy to work with. Heat it red hot then let it cool gradually.

Using the shotgun at a guide hand form the trigger guard.

Solder a small piece of brass to the front of the formed piece.

Heat the whole guard and spray it with water while it is hot, to harden the metal.

Drill holes in appropriate places to attach it to the shotgun.

Polish the brass to a bright shine.

Mark and drill small holes in the wood to accept screws.

Screw the guard to the shotgun with appropriate hardware.

Step 12: Safe in Public

If desired you may want to identify this as a toy f you are going in a public setting.

I personally have to come up with a different costume since this is too realistic looking from a distance...
<p>Funny story...</p><p>I gave this to a co-worker. He got pulled over by the police, long story, short... they loved it...</p>
Shop smart, shop S-mart. Excellent work.

About This Instructable

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Bio: Bit of a background in various electrical and mechanical fields, obscure sense of humour and typically willing to help...
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