Introduction: Double Sided Infinity Scarf

Picture of Double Sided Infinity Scarf

We will be making a double sided infinity scarf! The materials you'll gather will be enough for two scarves or one with enough fabric left to create another scarf down the road.

Materials needed:
2 yards each of two different fabrics. I chose to use soft flannel prints that were on sale at Jo-Anns for $3 a yard.
A sewing machine
Rotary cutter and mat OR sharp scissors and an eye for a straight line

Step 1: Prepare the Material and Trim the Fold.

Picture of Prepare the Material and Trim the Fold.

Lay out the 2 yards of fabric. Keep it folded in half so that it measures about 22inches by 72inches. You'll notice on the two long sides there is an open side and a folded side. We will be working with the folded side right now.

Fold the fabric half and half again maintaining a lined up folded edge. Using a rotary cutter, trim off the folded edge. We do this so that you will end up with two long rectangles measuring 22inches by 72inches rather than the folded fabric at 44x72.

Step 2: Choose Your Second Fabric, Put Them Together, and Sew.

Picture of Choose Your Second Fabric, Put Them Together, and Sew.

Choose your second fabric. Repeat step 1 for this fabric. I chose a fun opposing print for variation.

Lay the fabrics out so that the printed sides/soft sides/"correct sides" are facing inward and together.

Sew both of the long sides. We are aiming to sew a tube at this point. Do not sew the short sides.

I chose to leave the selvage on the fabric and not trim it. I just sew inward a little bit. Later on, this will affect how the seams line up. If you're a perfectionist or are aiming for a very precise scarf, you may want to cut the selvage. I figure that this thing will end up wrapped and crumpled around my neck, so I'm not too worried about it.

Step 3: Trim the Short Sides and Turn Inside Out

Picture of Trim the Short Sides and Turn Inside Out

After sewing both long sides, lay the fabric out on your table/mat.

If need be, trim the short edges of any excess or crooked fabric left. If you skip this part, you may notice some bunching in the final product.

Once trimmed, turn the tube/scarf inside out so that the printed/soft/"right" sides are showing.

Step 4:

Picture of

At this point, you'll want to line up one of the seams and start sewing the short sides together.

To prepare for this step, I folded the scarf in half and found the seam. You want to sew it so that the right sides are facing each other and the loop/scarf isn't twisted.

Line up the seam and lay the fabric extras on opposing sides (as shown in second picture) so that you'll be sewing a flat seam.

Sew. For my purposes, I didn't keep a specific allowance in mind but consistently sewed around the edge.

As you reach the end, you'll notice it's hard to fit the fabric under the machine. Take the fabric away from the machine at this point. We will be top stitching it shut.

Step 5: Top Stitch the Scarf Closed

Picture of Top Stitch the Scarf Closed

Once you've taken the scarf from the machine, straighten it out so that the part you couldn't sew is facing you.

Pull the fabric taut at the seams just around the open hole. You'll notice that it creates a natural hem. YAY!

Place the fabric under your machine and top stitch the fabric closed. Stay close to the edge but keep checking to make sure you are getting both of the sides of the fabric and that the hem stays rolled under. I keep track of this by keeping a taut pull on it while I'm sewing.

You'll notice the difference in a natural stitch of the red and white fabric as opposed to the top stitch seam of the blue fabric. This isn't a huge issue considering you'll be wrapping the scarf around your neck. It's easy to hide.

Step 6: All Done!

Picture of All Done!

At this point, you could iron the scarf, model it around the house, wear it out in a blizzard, give it to a friend, take it out to a nice seafood dinner, or stare at it in awe.

Place the loop around your neck, twist the bottom, and loop it around your neck again to create the infinity scarf. Turn the fabric inside out for a different look! There's even enough for a hood!

Enjoy!

Some last thoughts:

- To create just one double sided scarf with two yards of fabric, buy 1 yard each of two different fabrics, cut up the 36 inch side of each, sew it to itself to get the 72 inch rectangle. Then continue with the steps.

- To create a one print infinity scarf, buy 2 yards of fabric, leave the fold/do not cut the fold, and sew up the other long side to create your tube, and finish.

- If you're shopping at JoAnns, always check their site for coupons! Save money where you can!

Comments

coffeebetsy (author)2015-05-21

I really like the patterns you chose. I'll make one of these and take it out for a nice seafood dinner.

laece (author)coffeebetsy2015-05-21

Thank you! A nice seafood dinner truly is the only option! Don't forget the scallops!

NaMakana (author)2014-11-27

This is very cute! Question, did you prewash your fabric? Thanks!

laece (author)NaMakana2014-11-27

Thank you! I did not pre wash the fabric.

MicioGatta (author)2014-09-25

Beautiful idea and wonderful fabrics!

laece (author)MicioGatta2014-09-25

Thank you so very much!

seamster (author)2014-09-24

Nice work! Thanks for sharing this cool scarf!

laece (author)seamster2014-09-24

Thank you! I'm happy to share and hope it helps others!

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