Introduction: Dremel Small Batch Mixer

Picture of Dremel Small Batch Mixer

This is a quick and easy 'ible.

I have always felt that my cordless Dremel was one of the most versatile tools in my toolbox and recently I had cause to make up several small batches of chemical mixes.

If you have ever mixed lots of batches of anything you will know that it's no fun...

So I came up with the Dremel small batch mixer.

Step 1: You Will Need...

Picture of You Will Need...

For this you will need:

1 Dremel multi (cordless or otherwise)

Several harp inter-dental cleaners (I don't know if they call them this everywhere in the world but they are little plastic devices that have a curved section at the end with a small amount of dental floss strung between them)

The handle of the inter-dental cleaner fits perfectly into the standard chuck on a dremel.

Once tightened the cleaner forms an offset mixing tool.

Note* you need to keep the Dremel at relatively low speed as the cleaners are fragile and being an eccentric load, as the speed increased, so does the wobble and they break off and fly away at huge speed.

Step 2: Demonstration

I have made 2 demonstration videos, the first is a bowl of water with a small drop of washing liquid added, I really should have covered the top because as I ramped up the speed, a fair amount of suddy water ended up spread around the kitchen.

The second video is of the mixer beating an egg for scrambled eggs. I have used this method since while camping and it does produce extremely fluffy scrambled eggs. This shows that the Dremel is not only a toolbox tool, but a cooking, camping and survival tool as it runs for an eternity on a single charge.

If you like this one please remember to vote for me above, thanks.

Comments

SherylinRM (author)2017-11-26

I laghed when I seen the eggs imagining them all over the place.

Thanks for the tip :)

andrewwilson (author)2016-11-06

That is brilliant! I like this. I will try this when I am do small resin batches.

Thanks.

dchesson93 (author)andrewwilson2016-11-12

I can definitely see the use of this for some things, but wouldn't resin have a million and one bubbles in it after this mixing method was used? That's something to avoid in a lot of resin applications.

you are correct about the bubbles, hence this instructable:
https://www.instructables.com/id/Old-HDD-Vibration-Table

Huh! I may have to throw one of those together. I currently just pour anything I need to be especially clear of bubbles at work and use a small vacuum chamber we have there to clear it out, but this would definitely be more convenient.

I have made a mini vibration table to shift the bubbles too:
https://www.instructables.com/id/Old-HDD-Vibration-Table

No problem, I was just thinking afterwards that if you needed to up the speed, something stronger like say a 3mm Allen key would make a serious beater at high speed

rafununu (author)2016-11-04

I think that Dremel speed is far too high, even the lowest one. There's a dedicated tool called robot mixer to make this kind of job safely without broking anything !

No, I can actually bring it up to nearly half speed and still mix some pretty viscus stuff. I don't need a dedicated tool for mixing as it is a rare event for me and the pack if interdental cleaners cost me €1.25 for 32 of them so if they break I'm not worried. (by the way in mixing 25 batches I only broke 2 mixers)

About This Instructable

10,351views

24favorites

License:

Bio: I am an automation engineer but I will give anything a go. I don't know if you call if pessimism or just being an ... More »
More by Left-field Designs:DIY Self-Locking NutLCD Monitor Stand to Drill PressHandy Hole Size Checker
Add instructable to: