Introduction: Drill Press Bread

Picture of Drill Press Bread

Do you know what 'transhumance' means?
According to wiki transhumance is 'the seasonal movement of people with their livestock between fixed summer and winter pastures'.
I never could have said it better.

What livestock is to rather normal people, is my drill press to me.
In weektime (when my wife is at work) my drill press lives in the kitchen, and in the weekends (when I'm glad to have my wifie at home) she lives in my workshop (my drill press).

A drill press is something wonderful to have in the kitchen, believe me. I'm using it to make highly airy dough, for example. Flour, yeast & water in a bowl, power on and a few minutes later that dough is yours!

Easy, enjoy!

Step 1: Shape a Paddle

Picture of Shape a Paddle

The key ingredient of this setup is a large paddle drill.

Start shaping - I'm still experimenting to find out the most optimal design - a nice piece of untreated wood (beech is just perfect), using plane & jigsaw, and use a circular saw to cut a groove in the top, where you'll insert that paddle drill.

An inox screw will secure the whole (there has to be already a hole in the drill).

Some sanding & oiling and you're done.

Step 2: Start Paddling!

Picture of Start Paddling!

Move the drill press into the kitchen.
Fix it with heavy bolts - if you have an intelligent but not so strong wife - to the kitchen workplan.
Or with normal sized torx screws - if she's not so smart.

This is surely the end of female votes on my projects... Just kidding ladies! ;)

Put a bowl on the base.
Fix the paddle to the drill.
Add flour, beer, yeast, insects or whatever you want to pimp up that bread.

Power on!

Hold the bowl with both hands and start the magic...

You'll see, it's a shame why this setup doesn't appear standard in, for example, the ikea catalog!

Enjoy!!!

Comments

ray.riley.7140 (author)2014-09-20

I laughed when i saw this. I remember my dad taking his electric drill and attaching it a new paint mixer paddle and making a large batch of peanut butter dough in a five gallon bucket. Otherwise, he would have killed the mixer, even with a single batch.

leangallagher (author)2014-09-06

i have been treated like a crazy by my father just about mention this idea ,.,, now you doit (?)

Brit4Shains (author)2014-04-27

Tim "The Toolman" Taylor could learn some things from you... =)

Nice 'ible!!

leftfootleashed (author)2014-04-24

Using power tools in the kitchen. That's a paddlin'

vincent7520 (author)2014-04-16

Faut dire que t'es Belge, sinon tous les Amricains vont penser que les Français se moquent de leurs femmes. Déjà qu'on est pas bien vu !!!… ;)))

This private message being said, this is a nice addition to the kitchen.

However you should be aware that a real bread kneading machine has both a rotary and a planetary motion which explains why it is difficult to make our own at home.

Nice idea though.

But, as I said in French, be a gentleman and let your wife enjoy your personal input to the kitchen !

chrisdp (author)2014-03-31

Brilliant. Now I have a reason to motivate for a new, clean, variable speed drill.

pfred2 (author)2014-03-25

I don't think you'd want to move my drill press into the kitchen

http://img535.imageshack.us/img535/8026/millpic.jp...

Without the stand it weighs 667 pounds. I have a Kitchenaid though so I guess I'm OK.

bricobart (author)pfred22014-03-26

Let's move that kitchen to the workshop!!!

paganwonder (author)2014-03-25

Oooh...mashed potatoes....yeah...

bricobart (author)paganwonder2014-03-26

More cheezzz, mooooooore!!!

Attmos (author)2014-03-25

Cool. You should make mashed potatoes too.

bricobart (author)Attmos2014-03-26

Yummie, wiz cheeeeeeeeeezzzzzzzzzz!!!

About This Instructable

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Bio: I made a beer mug with only a knife & a hatchet. I think that says a lot about me.
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