Introduction: Drip-free Cooling Packs

Picture of Drip-free Cooling Packs

Cooling packs have so many uses.

It's a weapon for combatting the summer heat.

It's useful for cooling burns and bruises.

It preserves the refreshing cold drinks during outings.

–––

But they cost money to buy.

And they almost always follow with a consequence: dripping water.

–––

Here's how to make drip-free cooling packs at home with things you already have.

Step 1: Gathering Materials

Picture of Gathering Materials

Only a few materials are necessary for this DIY:

  • Any water-sealing bag (ex. ziplock bag)
  • Sponge
  • Water
  • Freezer
  • Straw (optional)

Step 2: Saturate the Sponge

Picture of Saturate the Sponge
  1. Submerge the sponge in water
  2. Squeeze the sponge multiple times to ensure all pores are filled
  3. Let excess water drip off (alternatively, lightly squeeze off excess water)

The completed sponge should be full of moisture but not drip any water.

Step 3: Seal the Cool Pack

Picture of Seal the Cool Pack
  1. Place the sponge inside the water-sealing bag (it is preferable if the size of the sponge is similar to the size of the bag)
  2. Use a straw to remove excess air from the bag as you seal it (but don't remove the air in the porous surface of the sponge) – this is optional, but recommended

To remove the air, suck on the exposed end of the straw until the bag deflates. Once deflated, quickly pull out the straw and seal the bag.

If you have no straw, you can suck out the air by simply using your mouth (not as effective but works)

Step 4: Freeze & Use

Picture of Freeze & Use

  1. Place the bag in the freezer, let freeze completely (time varies depending on the size of the sponge)
  2. When you need it, take it out and use it!

Step 5: Extra

  • At first, the cooling pack will be stiff, but with no time it will become soft again
  • Once made, the cooling pack can be reused many times, but I recommend adding a bit of water after a few times; some water may evaporate

–––

If you enjoyed this, please consider voting for me in the Beat the Heat Challenge, Outside Contest and MacGyver Challenge! Thanks! ^^

Comments

augapfel (author)2017-08-06

Couldn't you add a tablespoon of salt to the water the sponge sucks up? Then the sponge would never get hard but would be plenty cold.

About This Instructable

273views

2favorites

License:

Bio: Hi! I'm Miz! I'm just a girl who loves DIY! Happy to create instructables and happy to help with anything I can! \(^-^)/
More by Mizathel:Cleaning Keyboard With Sticky NotesDrip-free Cooling Packs20 Unusual Ways to Use Any Paper
Add instructable to: