Instructables

Dual-nation power strip

Featured
Picture of Dual-nation power strip
All frequent travelers know that if you are visiting a foreign country, it's a good idea to know ahead of time what kind of sockets the country you are visiting has, and what kind of adapter you'll need in order to plug-in or charge your electronic devices.

My wife and I have a home in Brazil, where the standard socket configuration is different from the U.S., using round plugs rather than the standard flat prongs on devices manufactured in (or more frequently now, for) the U.S. market.

I've installed dual pronged sockets in our home, which will accommodate both round (Brazilian) and flat (U.S.) pronged appliances and chargers, but have frequently run into a problem when trying to use multiple devices from both countries on the same power strip.

While it's possible to purchase power strips that will accept both plug configurations, these tend be very expensive, (more than US$20), compared to the relatively cheap power strips which can be purchased in the U.S. ($2 to $5 US dollars). So I decided to make my own, and here's how I did it.

If you frequently visit another country which uses a different type of plug then your home country, and you need to plug in devices with two different plug configurations, this Instructable may be helpful.

If you like this Instructable, please consider voting for it in the 'Hack It!' contest.


Materials:
• Powerstrip

Tools:
• Power drill
• Screw driver
 
Remove these adsRemove these ads by Signing Up

Step 1: Open the power strip

Picture of Open the power strip
If you need to be told to unplug the power strip before you take it apart and start messing with the guts, you should probably stop reading this right now;-)

My power strip was held together by four small screws on the underside, one on each corner. Take these out, and gently pry apart the plastic top bottom, so you can get at the electrical guts.
bellyr688 months ago
I bought a similar product made by Belkin, which has 2 USB outlets. But it plugs directly into the wall rather than being on a short cord, which isn't as helpful when your hotel room's outlet is in an inconvenient place. So...thank you for sharing. Great job! Visit website
charlieb0008 months ago
change the plug on your power board to a male IEC (or mount a panel mount male IEC into the board if there is enough room and depth for it) and then in the country you are in, borrow or buy a computer power cable (their country's plug to an IEC female) and use. Does not convert voltage (need an autotransformer).
Winged Fist (author)  charlieb0008 months ago
It's not clear to me how this would resolve the issue of plugging devices with two different plug configurations into the same power strip?
jensenr301 year ago
very cool.
and practical even!
kudos
great solution! does the connection work pretty reliably?
Winged Fist (author)  amandaghassaei1 year ago
Thanks Amanda! Connection works great if you carefully measure and drill holes, which I did. One clarification; Brazilian sockets will only power Brazilian devices, even though US devices will fit, but this serves my purposes, allowing for three devices from each region.