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First things first. Check with your doctor before using duct tape, titanium, and dental floss to close a wound.

Through my internet travels I saw a picture which used a needle, thread, and duct tape to close a wound. It reminded me of how you can close a turkey with lacing cord and stainless pins. This is a hybrid of the two.

Since titanium is them most hypoallergenic material known to man, it was only natural to use it in a bandage. You can get 10 feet of it for about $10.00 from Rio Grand.

Step 1: Get Your Materials

For this project you will need:

  • Duct tape
  • Titanium Wire
  • Dental Floss
  • Parchment Paper

Step 2: Reinforce the Ends

Cut two strip of duct tape. Then fold the ends of the strips over 4 times. Place the strips, head to head, with the sticky side down on parchment paper.

Step 3: Punch Holes

Use crafting punch to cut four holes. One in each corner. If you don't have a crafting punch you can cut small slits with a knife.

Step 4: Cut Your Wire

Cut a section of titanium wire and roll over one end. You don't want any sharp edges.

Thread the wire through the holes as shown in the photos.

Roll over the remaining ends.

Roll up the bandage in the parchment paper for storage.

Step 5: Lace It Up

Place the bandage over you split skin. Pull the two strips together like you're pulling your shoe laces tight. Tie a couple knots to secure it. Thanks for reading.

<p>As a medical assistant I do not recommend using duct tape on skin. It can cause irritation of the underlying skin and prove to be very difficult to remove without a lot of pain. If one were to consider using this method, I would suggest using cloth medical tape meant for use on skin.</p>
<p>Nice work. What is the name of that knob handled punch you use? I can't find it anywhere so far. Thank you.</p>
<p>The punch looks like a pretty standard leather punch, aside from the big thing on the end, available from Tandy or other leather supply stores. You can either get fixed size punches, or ones where you have a handle and tips that you screw on and off for various hole sizes. </p>
Goes right up there with the tampons for deep, penetrating wounds. Seriously useful for hard-core survival situations or high-risk activities.
<p>Just last week my great dane tried to shake hands with me, missed and opened up my forearm, for about three inches in what i would call a laceration,. it didnt go deep- just tore the skin . as a retired paramedic i wasnt too worried about the slice and let it bleed for a few minutes to help rinse out the mung and garfus, then i used paper towel to stop the flow and while it was still wet, slathered on some triple antibiotic ointment containing neomycin sulphate, bacitracin, and polymycin sulphate... its a knock off of a much more expensive name brand purchased at dollar general.... after greasing up the gash , liberally, i wrapped paper towels around the whole arm and then used duct tape to secure it in place firmly enough that it stopped any further bleeding. next day i checked for infections (towel came off easily and the duct tape too) rinsed the worst of the gore away gently in order not to start it bleeding again and used hydrogen peroxide,followed with potassium permangenate to complete the debridement, it healed without infection, which can be spotted in angry red color and pain at the site, if this happens its important to treat it . I am forty miles from help in the country and if i had found my superglue it would have left me with less of a scar, </p><p>hydrogen peroxide is really inexpensive and i recommend it for your prepared site, and KMN04 is really light weight and comes in a porous granule form you can carry dry, use to disinfect wounds, after diluting to a rich purple, <strong><em>in an emergency sterilize drinking water by keeping it very light pink,repeat very light</em></strong> pink... sterilize a field before surgery ,again dark purple. its a powerful fungicide for your feet, or to cure crotch rot. it dyes the skin temporarily, and it makes a great fire starter used in tiny amounts with glycerin to start a fire. this instruction is for grown ups who understand the words emergency and dont think a little is good mores better.<strong><em>its poisonous in the dark purple stage if ingested..goes bang with glycerin if used liberally.</em></strong><b><em>the salve and kmno4 are highly recommended to help out with wounds.</em></b></p><p>ebay has a pound of it for koi ponds for $7. chemically pure its higher cost and less of it, 2 Tablespoons occupies little space in a plastic bag and the bag helps prevent sticking to the wound. the parchment paper is a wonderful idea and the whole concept that you can take care of a big wound yourself when required is something that more people need to put into the concept of survival. . </p><p>i kept the dog didn,t beat him and he recovered from getting cusssed out.</p>
<p>Reminds me of Montgomery straps (http://www.deroyal.com/medicalproducts/woundcare/product.aspx?id=wc-genwound-montgomerystraps); only seen them used once, on a large, complex abdominal wound but it's something that sticks in your mind.</p>
<p>In my travels. . . First time around there were no doctors but I had some of the first generation superglue an it worked great - once the blood flow slowed enough to keep the sg from washing away. Second time, no doctors, no superglue, no lidocaine but I did have sewing needle and polyester thread. Skin is tough stuff, had to use needle nose pliers to push needle in and pull out! Now I know why suture needles are curved and have a triangular cutting point. I now own a couple suture kits.</p>
<p>When it's time to remove the bandage, make sure you pull the tape strips from the far edges towards the inside (towards the wound), otherwise you may stretch the wound and reopen it.</p><p>I would even add a fold on the other end of the strips to have something easy to grab for removal.</p>
<p>Be really careful about duct tape on skin. It can be really hard to get to release. It's caused the need for skin grafts before.</p><p>Alternatively you can use gaff tape, it's slightly more expensive, but has no issue releasing off of human skin.</p>
Awesome addition to a bug out bag. Throw in Super glue and you're good.

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