Instructables

MintyBoost! - Small battery-powered USB charger

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This project details a small & simple, but very powerful USB charger for your mp3 player, camera, cell phone, and any other gadget you can plug into a USB port to charge!

The charger circuitry and 2 AA batteries fit into an Altoids gum tin, and will run your iPod for hours: 2.5x more than you'd get from a 9V USB charger! You can use rechargable batteries too.

Some numbers...
iPod video (tested, using alkaline batteries): 3hrs more video (1 full recharge)
iPod mini (tested w/rechargeables): 25 hours more (1.5 full recharges)
iPod shuffle (unverified): 60 hours more (5 full recharges)
Weight (with 2xAA): 3.5oz

This project is suitable for beginners, some soldering tools are necessary but even if you've never soldered before it should be pretty easy. You can etch a circuitboard and/or breadboard this up, or simply buy the kit from the adafruit webshop.

I've also documented the process of designing this kit, in case other people interested in designing and making kits are interested in learning how to start selling their own kits!

This project was developed under support from EYEBEAM, thanks!

  • NOTICE!!!
  • This instructions are outdated, some
  • minor changes have been made to
  • the kit to make it better. If you're building
  • a purchased kit please read the docs at:
  • http://www.adafruit.com/make/mintyboost
  • THANKS!!!! - ladyada
 
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Step 1: The Process (Meta documentation)

This next 10 steps detail how I went through the process of coming up with the idea, hardware, design, etc. for this project. It's not 100% correct but it's pretty close. Since this project only took 2 days (on & off) to design/test/release, it's a lot easier to keep track of than something enormous like the x0xb0x.

I also include the schematic/layout files in Eagle format. The prototype one is best for etching at home (its single sided)

Step 2: The Process: Come up with an idea

OK so where does an idea come from anyways? Its the only important question & the most difficult. I guess I'd have to say it was prompted by looking at these half-dozen projects:

*Aaron Dunlaps 9V USB charger
*Another 9V + 7805 USB charger (Instructables)
*Jason Streigel's 9V+7805 USB 'battery' (hackaday)
*Ians Firewire switching charger (Instructables )
*Chris DiClerico's 9V+AA's firewire charger

OK, there's probably even some I'm missing. So what's the overarching theme here? Almost all use 9V batteries and a 7805 (an extremely common linear 5V regulator: makes a solid 5V from 7-18V input). This design works great because, well, 7805's are awesome and 9V's provide 7-9V depending upon how 'dead' they are.

However, there's one thing about 9V's that I've learned (from lots of bad experiences). One is that they don't have a lot of amp-hours: that is, how much current (amps) they can provide and for how long (hours). A duracell 9V provides -about- 500mAh over its lifetime. That's 500 mA (or .5A) for one hour or 100mA for 5 hours. That number is somewhat idealized but its a good starting point.

Another problem is that they don't like to supply a lot of current, because they have high internal resistance (~2ohms), but basically that just means that if you want a lot of current (say to resuscitate a drained device) the 9V wont provide all 500mAh, but maybe more like 400. (Say you're drawing 250mA, then .25A*2ohm = 0.5V lost to internal resistance. For more info on 9V, read the duracell datasheet )

Another problem with the 9V+7805 scheme is that a 7805 is a linear regulator. That means if you want 100mA at 5V (basically, USB power) then you're taking 100mA at 9V and then losing the 4V*100mA = 400mW (.4W) difference as heat.

As the battery wears down to 7V the heat loss goes down to (7-5V)*100mA=.2W but you're still getting bad efficiency. At best the efficiency is 72% (5V/7V) and at worst its 55% (5V/9V) That means you're losing about a third of the battery power to heat!

I'll also throw out that the 7805 itself has a quiescent current of about 5mA so you're always losing 5% (5mA/100mA) efficiency just for regulation! (& that's at least since if you're trickle charging the battery at 50mA then the 5mA quiescent is 10%)

OK so basically the 7805+9V solution works but the efficiency is startlingly low, say 60% or so, and provides only 300mAh at 5V.

We can engineer better!

Step 3: The Process: Engineering a better solution

Picture of The Process: Engineering a better solution
From experience, I know that AA's are great. They are cheap, have lots of power, very low internal resistance and are easily available everywhere. Whereas a 9V has 500mAh (for a total of 9*500 = 4.5Wh power) two AA's have 3000mAh each for a total of 2 * 1.5V * 3000mAh = 9Wh, about twice as much power. The only problem is that 2xAA's provide 3V and what we need is 5V. With a 9V battery we can use a linear regulator because 5V is greater than 9V but, sadly, we cant use a linear regulator to turn 3V into 5V. Instead we will need to use a boost regulator (also known as a DC/DC switching/step-up regulator)

The process of how a boost regulator works is somewhat beyond the scope of this document, suffice to say they work great but are a little more annoying than linear regulators because you have to pick out an inductor and wire up some extra parts. You can get a lot more info about Boost Converters at wikipedia which is also where I stole the boost topology image from.

Step 4: The Process: Enclosure selection

So at this point I start thinking about enclosure and size. Most people think of this last, and that's a bad idea. If there's one thing I've learned from hacking on electronics, its that you should try and select the case first because it dictates a lot of the electronics and interface.

I know that the parts for the kit must be all through-hole (no surface mount) and easy to work with. I also want AA batteries, 2 is good although I know from experience that most boost converters will work with any number from 1 and 3 just fine. I have a predilection for Altoids tins and I also know that I can fit ~2 AA's into a gum tin so I pull out a tin and take some measurements.

OK 2 AA's fit well, so now I rummage through my collection of battery holders and find one (PCB-mount) which seems to be pretty good, it doesn't have a switch but I don't need one anyway (see quiescient calculations, later on)

So I take some measurements...Looks like I have about 1.25" x 0.7" semicircular PCB space at the top for the circuit board.

I also try out another battery holder I have, this gives me more space, 1.25"x0.85"...but the batteries go in sideways so one would have to remove the holder to change the batteries. I'd prefer that you can just take them out directly, so I don't go with this one (it also turns out I don't need that extra space)

(I now do a little hack to turn the PCB mount 2xAA battery holder into a wire-lead one. Basically I just solder on red and black 6" wires and clip off the PCB through-hole leads. This is actually a little difficult because the plastic melts and you have to sort of keep it in place while you solder. Its not suggested :) )

Now that's done I'm ready to think about what I can cram into that space.

Step 5: The Process: Boost chip selection

So now it's time to design the boost supply. Since I don't have much space, I'm going to try to make my circuit as tiny as possible but still be easy to solder. That means I want a boost chip that is 8-DIP (smallest though-hole), with an internal MOSFET switch (1 less part) and is high frequency (to keep the inductor small). I also need to be able to supply 100mA at 5V and it should run on as low as 2V input. Also I want to be able to buy it online from a common supplier.

  • 8-DIP package
  • Internal FET switch
  • 100mA output @ 5V
  • 2V minimum input voltage

OK, lets search Digikey. I start with "DC/DC converter 8-DIP" and check "items in stock"

I then select 1 output, 8-DIP (to differentiate between 18-DIP) and select all the current-outputs >=100mA and apply the filter. There's till about 40 options. So then I select the all voltage input ranges that start with 2V or less. Also I select all the Adjustable, and 5V-inclusive output voltage options

Looking over this list, it looks like I have a lot of options so I'm going to go back and select only the chips that can be preset to 5V (as opposed to adjustable ones that use 2 resistors to set the voltage). 5V is very common so every reasonable DC/DC chip will be available with such an option.

Now there are about a dozen options.The LT1073, LT1111, LT1173 and LT130x as well as the MAX751 & MAX756. They're all pretty much the same, so I basically make my choice based on price at 100 pieces (since I'm planning to kit it up). I also know that Maxim is great about sending samples so I decide to go with the MAX756 (datasheet) which is $2.32/100. Note that I could have gone with any of them, so this a somewhat arbitrary choice.

According to the datasheet, I can supply up to 200mA @ 5V, run off input voltages as low as 0.7V and the efficiency is about 85% with 2 AA batteries. The chip also runs at 500KHz which is pretty fast and means that the inductor can be pretty small (~22uH) Anyway,I've used this chip before and its worked out well for me.

Step 6: The Process: Inductor selection

The next step is to choose an inductor. This can be a bit of a pain, and there is a lot of math you can throw at the problem. However, the datasheet suggests (under "inductor selection") to get a 22uH inductor, with a ~1.2A saturation limit, and DC resistance of 0.02 ohms.

What we want is through-hole, which actually means its going to be hard to find an inductor; almost all inductors are surface mount. But I'll take a look at what digikey has to offer. I search for "fixed uH inductor ~smd ~smt" which means I don't want SMT/SMD (surface mount) and I want a non-adjustable inductor that is in the uH range (not mH or nH). I then filter out inductors with 1-3A current and 18-27uH inductance.

That filters it down to about a dozen choices. The SLF inductor is actually surface mount, and we're going to outright ignore the ones that cost more than $2.50. Inductors for small electronics like this should cost around $1-$2, as a guideline. That leaves us with the DN7418-ND "INDUCTOR 27UH POWER AXIAL" and the 6000-220K-RC "INDUCTOR HI CURRENT RADIAL 22UH." Both of these look good, with about ~1.5A saturation current and 0.07 ohm DC resistance.

I also check out Mouser. The online search for mouser isn't as nice as Digikey's so I end up looking at the paper catalog instead. I only found one inductor, really, the 18R223C (22uH radial power inductor) and/or the 18223C (axial version) that also has plenty of power capacity and a 0.03ohm DC resistance.

So, order 2 of each of these.

Step 7: The Process: Rapid Prototyping

Picture of The Process: Rapid Prototyping
protolayout.gif
PICT0013.JPG
In reality, what I did was look through the Digikey catalog, where I only found the DN7418 inductor (the other one was somewhat hidden in the RF inductor section). And it showed up before the Mouser box, so I spent an hour or two making up a prototype.

The circuit itself is simple, I want one large electrolytic cap for low frequency smoothing on the battery, and an output cap pair (electrolytic and one ceramic cap for high freq. smoothing). I also need the chip, a reference voltage capacitor, the inductor and a schottky diode to finish off the boost regulator. I happen to have some 1N5818's, which are often used as schottky diodes in boost regulators. I also need a USB type A female jack, of course, and two holes to solder the battery pack into. You can compare the schematic to the topology diagram in step #3 keeping in mind that this chip has an internal transistor switch.

All these parts must fit into the space left over from the battery pack. I make EagleCAD library parts for the inductor and chip (the rest are already there) and lay out the board. I'm not going to detail making library parts in eagle or pcb layout, others have done so already. Use whichever software you want, I like Eagle because there's a free version available for download if you're just making small PCBs.

Since I am know this is just a prototype version, I make the PCB single sided -- for easy etching. I also make the traces really large. I print out a paper version of the PCB and punch the parts through to verify that they're the right shape/package.

I get my etching setup together, turn on the heater for the etching tank, and print out a bunch of tiled PCB layouts on toner transfer. I transfer the toner onto a single sided PCB and etch it in the tank

Then I clean off the toner transfer, drill the holes with a dremel drill-press with carbide drill bits, and cut out the shape.

Then I solder the parts in, and fit it into the case with the battery pack, using double-sided foam sticky tape to hold down both the battery holder and the PCB without shorting the PCB to the metal tin.

OK, done!

Step 8: The Process: Prototype testing

ind1_100ma_3V.JPG
ind1_100ma_25vin.JPG
ind1_250mA_3vin.JPG
Now we test to see if it works! With the two batteries inside, I measure the voltage on the USB connector: about 5V, which is good. I send off this version to a friend with once of each kind of iPod, including the newest 4G video iPod, for real-world testing: Both to verify the iPod will charge and also how long it will run with the additional pack.

Its also time to verify the math for efficiency: how good is it, after all?

So, in theory, we should be able to calculate the efficiency of the boost converter from datasheet info. We're basically boosting 2.5-3VDC -> 5VDC at around 50mA-100mA. Looking at the MAX756 datasheet, note the efficiency graph.

So we should be getting around 85% efficiency, perhaps a little more. I think the only thing that can really change this number a bit is the inductor. (Below, I verify I'm getting 82% efficiency)

If we're getting 82% efficiency conversion from 2 x 3000mAh Duracells, that means we get (2 * 1.5V) * 3000mAh * .83 = 7.38 Watt hours. Compare that to a single 9V as we calculated before: (1 x 9V) * 500mAh * .65 = 2.93 Wh. So we're going to get about 2.5x more power out of these two AAs than a single 9V.
With rechargeable batteries, we get (2 * 1.25) * 2200mAh * 81% = 4.45 Wh (about 50% more than an alkaline 9V and 3x more than a rechargeable 9V)

Next, lets verify the efficiency using test equipment, and try out the different inductors to see if they make a difference. Instead of using batteries, I'll provide 3V from a bench supply that will also tell me how much current is being drawn. And instead of an iPod I'll fake the load with a resistor. Since the standard USB current draw is 100mA from 5V, that means I need a 5V/.1A = 50 ohm load. I can't just use a tiny resistor because 5V * .1A = 1/2W and most resistors are 1/4W. So instead I take two large 100ohm 'power' resistors, and twist them together. I also check the resistance to verify that together they are 50ohms. I also find a 20ohm power resistor. This will allow me to not only test a 100mA load but also a 250mA load.

I perform 4 tests with 2 inductors: 100mA load for both 2.5V in and 3V in (rechargeable and disposable batteries) and 250 load for both.

My results are summarized in a table attached as the second image

It looks like inductor #2 is little more efficient, probably due to the fact it has a lower DC resistance (30 milliohms instead of 70mohm of the other inductor). It's also a bit cheaper so I'll go with that inductor.

Regardless, it looks like the efficiency is around 82% which is about what I expected.

Another thing to note is that I don't put an on/off switch in like you'd need with a 9V+7805 regulator. That's because the quiescent current of the MAX756 is very low, on the order of 100uA (0.1mA). I measured this myself and got about 75uA.

That means that the self-discharge rate is ~2000mAh / 0.1mA = 20,000 hours, more than 2 years. Most batteries don't last that long! Therefore we don't need a switch, when nothing is plugged in, almost no power is being used.

(in the end, i found another radial inductor that was cheaper and as efficient, which is what I use in the kit)

Step 9: The Process: Kit budgeting

So now that I've verified that the project works, I have to figure out whether I want to sell it, how many I expect to sell, and how much I want to charge. Lots of people have different techniques for this. I tend to go with my 'gut' which usually means there's a lot of information I use but its difficult to express it.

I tend to decide whether I want to sell something based on how popular/useful/easy it is. I think that this kit will be pretty popular and useful because lots of people have stuff that charges/powers over USB. Also, it seems like other people are selling similar things (like the 9V + 7805 type charger, or Griffin's 9V charger, or Belkin's 4xAA charger) It's easy to make because all the parts are through-hole and there's not a lot of them.

I'm going to basically assume I'll sell 200 or so within a few months, and I'll order parts in batches of 100, so I should budget that way. (I often buy more than 100 PCBs at a time because of the scale economies involved in PCB manufacture, as I show later.) It turns out so far that I can sell a couple hundred units of a kit in a few months, particularly if it gets picked up by a blog or web site. This may or may not be true for you, however if you cant afford to make 25 kits at once you're going to find that its hard to make any money in the process.

To figure out how much to charge, I make up a table with different quantity prices

To calculate the PCB costs, I used Advanced Circuit's insta-quote service.

These prices are for 2 PCBs, which I'll cut in two, because its cheaper (probably because they don't like dealing with very small circuit boards). I usually go with 2 week turn prices. Note that the PCB quote doesn't include the $150 one-time tooling NRE fee, which adds $3 to the /50 price and $1.50 to the /100 price. Advanced Circuits is a little expensive, but they're very good on quality and they're good at catching mistakes. Anyways, you can try going with a cheaper shop but I can only vouch for these guys.

There's also shipping prices included, maybe $1/per. In general, I double the parts cost to come up with the 'retail' cost. In this case, I'll charge $19.50. Anything less than $10 or $20 is great because $20 are considered to be stuff/food coupons, really.

Step 10: The Process: Finishing up!

There's a bit more work to do. First, I redesign the board since I'm going with a radial inductor instead of an axial one.

I actually do another etch test, to verify eveything one last time. Then I tile two boards together (cheaper) and generate gerbers.

I use gerbv (free software) for viewing and verifying the gerbers. On windows, I use GC-prevue

I always check the boards with www.freedfm.com before I ship them off to be made. I used 4pcb.com so it's the same company but even if you don't go with 4pcb.com as your PCB manufacturer, it's a neat service.

A week later (depending on your turn time) A box shows up with the circuit boards!

Then I sit in front of a computer and do a lot of website stuff. I also take a lot of photos. A good photo setup will make documentation easy. I have a simple 150W ECT bulb + diffuser setup at EYEBEAM. A tripod is key!

Step 11: Make: Tools

Picture of Make: Tools
Ok, so you've got the kit. Here's how to build it!

First get your tools together. There are a few tools that are required for assembly. None of these tools are included. If you don't have them, now would be a good time to borrow or purchase them. They are very very handy whenever assembling/fixing/modifying electronic devices! I provide links to buy them, but of course, you should get them whereever is most convenient/inexpensive. Many of these parts are available in a place like Radio Shack or other (higher quality) DIY electronics stores.

Step 12: Make: Parts

Picture of Make: Parts
Next, you'll need your parts

Step 16: Make: Place ceramic capacitors, inductor & jack

Place the two yellow ceramic capacitors C3 and C4, the power inductor L1 and the USB jack. The capacitors and inductor don't have a polarity, like the other capacitors and diode, so don't worry about putting them inbackwards.

Solder these parts in too. When soldering in the USB jack, make sure to put plenty of solder in the two large side holes: they are the mechanical connection for the jack. If you don't make a good solder joint (filling in the hole completely with solder) then the jack will eventually break! So do a good job.

Step 17: Make: Clip 2

Clip the excess wires here too. Don't clip the USB jack leads: they're just the right size.

Step 19: Make: Done!

OK, insert the MAX756 boost chip so that the little notch in the chip matches the notch in the socket. Make sure its well seated: press firmly, making sure all the pins are sliding into the socket straight. You're done!

Step 20: Test: Make sure it works

Now that it's built, its smart to do some minor tests to verify it's working properly. You'll need a multimeter with continuity test and voltage measuring capabilities, which every multimeter has. Read the manual to verify how to get into the modes you want.

Step 22: Case: Cut

Cut two notches in the end of the tin, just about where the flat part ends and the tin starts to round out.

Step 25: Case: Final fit

Once you're happy, remove the electronics and put the doublesided sticky foamtape on both the circuit board and the battery holder.

The tape keeps the circuit board in place as well as keeps the pins from shorting against the tin

You might have to push down on the battery holder once its in, to "pop-out" the bottom a little...the case will not quite close otherwise.

Step 26: Done!

That's it...go forth and boost!
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digipup14 days ago
Mine heats up a lot got any suggestions?
wulfhoul4 years ago
 do any of u know how to add a switch and led to this kit

a switch you would just wire directly onto the red cable coming formt he battery, the LED you would want to place right behindm the switch, probaply you would need a resistor to make sure the LED doesn't get a too high voltage.

This is very well-done and sexy! I want to make something very similar, and I was thinking it would be cool to use rechargeable batteries AND a small solar panel. The thing could be left on a car dashboard (assuming the sun isn't too bad for the batteries) and it would slowly charge the rechargeable batteries. THEN you could take it along and use it as an emergency power-source for phones. No expensive battery replacement, and no worrying about whether the sun is powerful enough.

Also: I'm not the most perceptive person, so correct me if I'm wrong: but why on earth do they not sell things like this in stores? People whose phones are dying are a pretty damn big demographic (and a desperate one at that!) They should sell these things pre-loaded with batteries at airports, supermarket checkout lanes, etc. What's going on with that?

indian not max ic max ic equivalent ?

BLR_RAVI2 months ago

just wonderful..a detailed project...

Great innovation!! But I still prefers the usual power banks because of some reasons that is it is not gonna last for a long time, and these batteries can't be able to charge my i phone even to 80%...

u could also use 2 dc batteries and put them in a watch case or can but the same idea just alittel more work needed to make.

Could I use hot glue instead of foam tape? Also, would this work?

http://www.amazon.com/DROK-Power-Converter-Module-...

Thanks.

djDarel4 months ago

can i use 4x aa batteries?? thanks..

rregi9 months ago
Hi..I am a student pursuing my third year in engineering..i have taken minty booster as my project..i have successfully implemented this circuit on the breadboard and got the output..but in the PCB m not being able to get the output..it would b really helpful if i get the layout of PCB..thanking you!
joshr12311 months ago
Did the popcorn come with the stuff? if it did what site do you order from that's good customer service!
Schmidty161 year ago
when will u make a solar powered one
Hey Can dis circuit be used for a 4-volt input battery(18650 kind li-ion cell,,2400mAh)????
coz i got six of dem from a laptop battrey.....
It would be great if you would help.......thanks
i don't know for sure, but oh my god! Use proper english! its not that hard to type an extra 3 or 4 keys on your keyboard is it?
scob89 dczupik1 year ago
Only as hard as hitting the shift key to capitalize your sentences. Also, Yes, This can be used with a 18650 Laptop cell. Got a 3AH one hooked up to mine and used a cheap gutted 18650 charger and a 6V solar panel to charge mine. No issues for the past 7-8 months.
Dirk.Steyn2 years ago
I was looking through the instructable and decided that I wanted to add in the low battery LED. I found the circuit diagram in the version 2 schematic showing how to wire it.

My question is regarding R3, the value is not mentioned? Also why is it neccessary if your using two 1.2V cells in series since it gives you 2.4V then while the LED that I want to use has a max forward voltage of 2.4V. This falls within the rating?

Or is the resistor used for when your using 1.5V batteries i.e. 3V? Anyways was just wondering if someone could help me out with the value? Thanks in advance.

Really enjoyed this instructable, still busy with it, but thanks LadyYada for this instructable.
what is he using to hold the pcb? id love to know what type of vice that is
She*
Not certain on the exact name, but i have one very similar i bought at a electronics store called a PCB vise...
flocha2 years ago
Hi, great project. Does anyone by any chance know the name of this components in Spanish?
Thanks a lot.
Products still tend to be sold under their english names... however the part numbers should at least be usable..
thanatos3702 years ago
If I wanted 2 parallel banks of 2 AA's to increase charger time, would your circuit work still?
if you have 2 sets of 2 AA's in series, and these sets in paralell (i.e. so the voltage is still 3V ) then yes it will work, you can also use AA or C or D size batteries..

:)
keigorjai2 years ago
This is one of the best idea I have never seen "IF" I saw this design 5 years ago.

No disrespect at all, but, I had my first 2G iPhone back to 2007 and I already bought this product in the market 5 years ago for my iPhone.

You didn't mention this is the original design, but if there is any product similar to yours. Why pay more for your product? All the big brand such as GP. Their retails price is even lower than yours.

Good luck mate.
Hello,
If you hadn't noticed, this was published 30th may 2006 - over 6 years ago!

Back when this was designed and available for sale, down here in Australia there wasnt a single commercial charger of this design available anywhere!

I have about 4 of these now, and they still work perfectly (2 x V2 and 2x V3), this design then inspired diy users to modify and improve the design, the company's saw this and developed their own.

Also, personally i would pay for something that i built, i know how it works, and i know wont fail anytime soon. This product is not cheap "Made in China" crap.


Please Check your dates before posting.
- Ralim
TurboSnail2 years ago
Looking at this, the 9v versions are way cheaper to make yourself, and if you're using rechargable 9v's in it is it really that much worse? Especially if you use the high-power ones that you can get now...

Nice project though, I like the presentation v. much!
aerinthaare2 years ago
How much would it cost me to get one of these pre-assembled? I would love to get my hands on one of these, but I solder like an epileptic squirrel at a rave party. I have looked around the internet for a usb charger to run my headphones with, but they never show me the actual power specs for the device output; I do not trust said products.
nodoubtman2 years ago
Mouser is 20$ shipping .. too much!
nkiegrea2 years ago
This is probably one of the coolest things I have ever seen. I downloaded the layout files and I am looking at various PCB Manufacturers... Custom Circuit Boards looks pretty good for these type of prototypes.

Any other suggestions for prototype projects like these?
I am from the uk and i am looking to build this kit. i was just wondering whether this is the right boost controller:
http://search.digikey.com/uk/en/products/MAX756CPA%2B/MAX756CPA%2B-ND/1130177
Looks about right... I haven't actually looked at the parts list, but all the voltages and stuff on your link are correct
knexfreak322 years ago
i see how this works it uses 2 1.5 volt batteries and then a voltage doubler finely a resistor to bring the voltage from 6.00 v. to 5.00 v. very simple.
jlund2 years ago
what r the parts caled i would like to know riten now so i can go buy them befor radioshack closes
09khanyu2 years ago
Forget about that. I hadn't checked the user manuel on the original website
09khanyu2 years ago
I would like use this to power an arduino with a 3.7V Li-Ion cell. Would I need to make any changes to the components.
legless3 years ago
You say a 9V battery has a high internal resistance and then quote ~2ohms. That is incredibly low resistance - it's almost a dead short. Did you mean it is more like ~2Mohms or something?
batteries are close to an ideal voltage source. An ideal voltage source has a resistance of 0 ohms. 2 ohms is actually pretty high for a battery. Most AA batteries are like 1/4 to 1/2 of an ohm. Shorting it would produce about 3.4 amps
ggardner72 years ago
cool
chndt20083 years ago
Great! China already has the product, price $ 2, I believe they stole your technique. I am Chinese, but I hate the Chinese. . . But such products have a question, that is unstable and may damage the battery. Reduce the battery life, which is found after a lot of people use.
friend can you send me the schematic diagram of your chinese version at nitesh.pandey@ymail.com,i want do do practicle and make it myself,help is appriciated
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