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EL Wire Hat: Sequenced and Sound Activated with Remote Control - powered by Arduino and Sparkfun

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Welcome to the Instructable guide of my EL Wire hat with some fun features.

The concept is an EL Wired hat with 8 sequenced EL wires controlled by a wired remote. Multiple speed controllable sequence modes are pre-programmed into an Arduino UNO, including a sound activation feature.

Features:
7 sequence modes (speed controlled)
1 sound activated mode (sensitivity controlled)
1 sequence mode that goes through all 7 previously mentioned sequences.

The brain behind my baby is an Arduino Uno Rev. 3 with a Spartkfun EL Escudo Dos shield.

This psychedelic fashion accessory was built for a festival, so it needed to be quite tough. Also it was built in a bit of a hurry, so steps were not documented during time of build. With that in mind, I will do my best to guide you through what I went through in as much detail as possible. 

 
 
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Step 1: Materials and Tools

A Hat - whatever style suits you and your EL Wire configuration.  We will be concealing our wires on the inside, so keep in mind that we will need to make holes in the hat. I would avoid using your grandfathers trilby :)
Arduino UNO Rev3
Sparkfun EL Escudo Dos
8 x 1m EL Wires 
DFRobot Sound Sensor
1K-Ohm Potentiometer
Potentiometer Knob
Push Button Switch (Normally-Open)
Toggle Switch
220 Ohm Resistor
1K-Ohm Resistor
Green LED
Red LED
Header Pins
Right angle Header Pins
4meters of Multicore cable (Ethernet)
Prototype Circuit Boards
9 x JST female connectors (2mm pitch)
Cable Ties
Heat Shrink (various diameters)
Gauge waterproof grommets
8 "AA" Battery Holder with Snap Connector
8 x 1.5V AA Batteries
Snap Connector
2.1mm Right Angle DC Power (Solder Plug End Connection)
1meter Spiral Cable Wrap (3/4inch)
Plastic Universal Enclosure 100 x 25 x 50 mm(Remote)
Plastic Universal Enclosure 135 x 95 x 45 mm(Brain
2 x 4-way El Wire splitters
Stackable Headers

Hot Glue Gun and Glue
Soldering Iron and all the stuff that goes with it
Drill and various drill bits
Set of files
Needle and thread




Step 2: The Hat

Picture of The Hat
08 Hat Inside.jpg
07 Hat Connectors.jpg
As I mentioned earlier, we will be butchering this hat, so I recommend you get hold of a hat that you don't mind sacrificing for the greater good. 

Attaching the EL wire to the Hat *
 - Start by selecting a colour sequence that appeals to you. Each 1meter EL wire wrapped nicely around the hat twice. The wire on the brim made it once around and I decided to spiral the last wire around top of the hat.

 - Make holes in the hat where you can tread the EL wire through, concealing the power cables inside the hat. This can been seen in picture #2 where you see the inside of the hat with power cables coming through.  

 - Use a Hot Glue Gun to secure the EL wires to the hat. After the 4day festival, I noticed that some of the wires started coming off, so I reinforced them by using a needle and thread in a few strategic places. 

 - In picture #3, you can see the numbered tails of the EL wire connectors hanging out the back of the hat.  I chose not to hardwire these wires to the Main Unit (Brain), as I wanted it to be detachable so I could travel with only the hat as carry-on hand luggage on a flight. This is not 100% necessary. 

 - Wrap the tails in a small section of Spiral Cable Wrap and Hot Glue the spiral wrap to the back of the Hat.

There is no need to be shy with the Hot Glue. Even if you do land up with cob webs, these can be easily picked off.

Step 3: Umbilical Cord

This is the link between the Hat and the Main Unit (Brain).

I used 2 x 1meter ethernet (8 core) cables.


The Hat Side...
 - Cut the female connectors off the EL Wire splitters and solder them to the one end of the ethernet cables (polarity does not matter as it is AC)
 - Insulate them by using heat shrink 
(repeat for all 8 connectors)

The Brain (Main unit )Side...
As the Umbilical cord would be exposed to the elements, I wanted to restrict rain from making its way into the Brain. This is why I took extra precaution to insulate the cables' entry into the Brain (Hence the use of gauge waterproof Grommets).
 - Drill appropriately sized holes in Brain's casing.
 - Attach Grommets to the Brain's casing
 - Slip the appropriate heat shrink on to the ethernet cables
 - Slip on and tighten the Grommet locking nut
 - Feed the ethernet cables through the grommets as the JST connectors will struggle to fit through the grommets
 - Solder the JST Connectors to the ethernet cable (once again, polarity does not matter).
 - Heat shrink the soldered cables to insulate
 - Slip the ethernet cables back out the grommets to leave just the JST cables and connectors showing on the inside part of the Brain. 
 - Use the remaining heat shrink to conceal the loose cables outside the brain.

Wrap the Spiral Cable Wrap around the cables.

Helpful hints:
 - don't forget to number the cables appropriately
 - If you dont have a continuity meter: buy one, or make a note of what colour coded cables are attached to which numbered connector

Step 4: Remote Control

Picture of Remote Control
10 Remote Case.jpeg
Remote_back.JPG
HatterBB_02.jpg
This is probably the trickiest part of the build. Please use the pictures as a guide. The breadboard circuit diagram will be especially helpful. 
Now I am sure there are better techniques to do some of these steps, but I will guide you through the methods I used.

Aligning the parts and mounting them on a Prototype Circuit Board preparing them for the Remote Control casing
 - Cut a piece of Prototyping Circuit Board to the appropriate size to fit in the casing (hopefully neater than my attempt).
 - Cut another piece of plastic to the same size as the Prototype Circuit Board. This will be used as frame to temporarily mount the switches and Potentiometer for correct height and placement. I will refer to this piece of plastic as "the frame" from now on.
 - Drill the appropriately sized holes in the frame at the appropriate places for where you would like to mount your controls and LEDs
 - Attach controls (switches and potentiometer) and LEDs to the frame.
 - Flip over the frame, so the the legs of the components point upwards.
 - Place the Prototype Circuit Board on top of the components legs, parallel and aligned with the frame. You will notice that the legs will most likely not all be the same height.

This is the tricky part... I used header pins and right angle header pins inserted into the Prototype Circuit Board to fill the gap between the board and components.
 - Solder these pins to the back of the Prototype Circuit Board in the correct place and on the components side, cut them to the appropriate length for each component.
 - Solder the components to the protruding pins.
 - Remove the frame.
 - For the DFRobot Sound Sensor, use a row of 3 right-angled pins so the connector lies flush with the Prototype Circuit Board.

Wiring 
 - On the underside of the Prototype Circuit Board (see pic), create tracks using short pieces of wire from the components to the base of the Prototype Circuit Board. I soldered rails along the left and right of the circuit board for Negative and Positive power (ground and +5v from Arduino). This was helpful to simplify the wiring in the remote control.  
 - At the base of the Prototype Circuit Board, solder a row of right-angle header pins (optional step - explained a few steps later).

Remote Control Casing 
 - Use the frame to mark the position of the holes on the Small Plastic Universal Enclosure (Remote control casing) and drill the same sized holes.
 - Drill a small hole in the top of the remote control casing for the DFRobot Sound Sensor (you may need to do this later to get exact positioning of this hole correct)
 - Drill a hole in base of the remote control casing for the Gauge Grommet.
 - Attach gauge grommet to the case and secure with locking nut.
 - Feed the remote cable through the gauge grommet in the enclosure.

Connecting the Remote Control Cable
Under the "Wiring" heading I mentioned that it was optional to have the header pins on the prototype circuit board. This is because the wires from the remote control cable can be soldered directly onto the board.
 - On the header pins, solder the ethernet cable onto the pins and heat shrink to insulate.

Closing the Remote Control
 - Insert the DFRobot Sound Sensor in the casing with microphone pointing in the direction of the top of the casing. I mounted mine perpendicular to the prototype circuit board due to a space limitation (this can be seen in the picture).
 - Align the components with the casing
 - Insert board
 - On the outside of case, attach the nuts to the Potentiometer, Mode Switch and Power Switch. 
 - Screw the case closed
 - Pop on the Potentiometer rubber knob

Remote...DONE!

Notes:
You may have noticed the Black and Yellow cable wrapped around the ethernet cable. Because I used two cables for the Main Power Positive and 2 cables for the Main Power Negative, I ran out of cable and wrapped two extra cables around. I used 4 cables for Main Power as I had no clue whether one cable would be sufficient for powering the entire system - so to be sure, I wanted to be as power conscience as possible.

Step 5: Remote Control Shield

Picture of Remote Control Shield
Battery Snapper.jpeg
imgres.jpeg
RemoteShieldHeaderPins.jpeg
This is the Shield that goes on top of the EL Escudo Dos and is the interface to the Remote Control.

 - Make a hole in side of the Yellow Plastic Universal Enclosure 135 x 95 x 45 mm (Brain) big enough for the remote cable (see picture).
 - Slip some heat shrink over the remote control cable (will be used to protect the cable from wear)
 - Pass the end of remote control cable through the hole
 - Strip the insulation from this cable revealing the individual cables.
 - Cut a piece of Prototype Circuit Board to a width of 20 x 20 points.
 - Solder on two rows of Header Pins corresponding to the position of the header ports of the Arduino/EL Escudo Dos (see picture).
 - Cable Tie the remote cable to secure it to the board.
 - Solder the Remote control cable to the correct pins.
 
My cable colour coding for this project is as follows...

Signal
Yellow:            DFRobot Sound Sensor
White/Blue:    1K-Ohm Potentiometer
Blue:                Mode LED (Red)
White/Brown: Mode Push Button

Arduino Power
Brown: Arduino +5 V
Black: Arduino Ground

Main Power
Orange & White/Orange
Green & White/Green
(The two double black cables at the top of picture will be explained in the next step)

Secure the Remote Cable from being tugged with a cable tie.

Step 6: The Brain

Finally....The Brain

This is the core of the system.
(Once again, please refer to the pictures below for guidance)

Main components are...*
Arduino UNO Rev3
SparkFun EL Escudo Dos
Remote Control Shield
12V EL Wire Inverter (Inverter) 
Yellow Plastic Universal Enclosure (135 x 95 x 45 mm) 

EL Escudo Dos Stackable Headers *
Out of the box, the EL Escudo Dos comes without Stackable Header Pins.
 - Solder a set of stackable header pins onto this board.

Inverter Connector *
The connector of the Inverter is one that connects to the EL Wire cable. The EL Escudo does not use this connector.
Either cut this connector off and solder on a JST connector (2mm pitch) or make a jumper cable as seen in picture of inverter. This is useful if you plan to use the Inverter for a simpler project in the future.
Polarity of this cable does not matter as it is AC power.
Connect the output of the inverter to the EL Escudo Dos "AC from inverter" connector.


Battery Pack Power *
Just as what we did for the Remote Control Cable in step 5, make a hole in the side of the Yellow Plastic Universal Enclosure 135 x 95 x 45 mm (Brain), big enough for the battery Snap Connector cable.
Slip some heat shrink over the cable to protect it from wear.

Main Power cabling
Please refer to the Circuit Diagram illustration for guidance with this step.
The Main Power is controlled via the Remote Control.
The positive from the battery snap connector is permanently wired to the Arduino and to the Inverter. 
The negative from the battery snap connector is soldered onto the Remote Control Shield (step 5). It passes through the Remote Control's Main Power Switch and then connects to the negative of the Arduino and Inverter, completing the circuit when the switch is closed.

Stacking *
- Stack the Boards: Arduino at the bottom, EL Escudo in the middle, and the Remote Control Shield on the top.

EL Escudo EL Wire Connection *
- Attach the 8 EL wire JST connectors of the Umbilical Cord to the El Escudo Dos.

USB Access *
 - Place the entire stack and Inverter inside the yellow case, and make sure that the USB port is pointing towards the side of the case.
Once completely assembled, you will not have access to the USB port of the Arduino so we will need to make a hole in the side of the case in order to update our code without needing to disassemble the entire Brain.
 - Mark the area where the USB port is on the Yellow Plastic Universal Enclosure (135 x 95 x 45 mm) 
 - Drill a hole in the side of the case
 - Use a file to tweak the shape until square and large enough to insert a USB cable.

Packing *
- Place the entire stack and Inverter inside the yellow case.



Close the Skull (Yellow Case) and Voilá !!! If all is good, all the hard work is done.

The entire Brain and battery pack can go into a backpack, giving you full control by using the remote.

Next... The code for the Arduino....
 

Step 7: Functionality and The Code

FUNCTIONALITY

The code is rather self-explanatory and (I believe to be) relatively well commented. There is also a serial println command at every step of the way for debugging especially if you need to tweak the code for the calibration of the potentiometer.

When you power up the device, the EL wire will "Initialise". In other words, they each flash once in sequence, from pin 2 to pin 9.
We are now in a waiting state until the mode button is pressed. Each press of the mode button toggles through a different sequence and flashes the Mode LED (Red) once, so the operator can confirm a mode change (as operator is wearing the hat).

There are 7 sequences that loop continuously between mode changes. During these modes, if the operator adjusts the Potentiometer, the speed of the sequence changes.

Sequenced Modes
Mode 1 - Step through all
Mode 2 - Fill up from bottom then empty from bottom
Mode 3 - Up and Down
Mode 4 - Sweep in botton to top, sweep out top to bottom
Mode 5 - Stack and unstack
Mode 6 - Alternate flashing
Mode 7 - Criss cross

Sound Sensor Mode
Mode 8  - When you reach this mode, the Mode LED with flash 10 times quickly in order to let you know that you are in this special mode.
The potentiometer now becomes your sound sensitivity control.

All Sequences
Mode 9 - This exits the Sound Mode and continuously runs through multiple loops of each of the Modes from 1 to 7 (Speed control on the potentiometer is now active). When the Mode Button is pressed, we return to Mode 1. 


THE CODE
All the Arduino code is both below and attached.




// Instructables Make It Glow 2012 HAT Sequencer
// ARDUINO UNO Rev. 3 + SPARKFUN EL Escudo Dos
//
//   ================= PARTS and CONFIG ===================
// EL Escudo Dos:        Shield mounted on Arduino UNO Rev. 3
// EL Wire:              Connected to El Escudo Dos on Digital out Digital Pins 2 -> 9(OUTPUT)
// LED indicator:        Indicates mode change and sound detection Pin 13(OUTPUT)
// Momentary switch:     Mode switcher (usually open) connected to Digital Pin 11(INPUT)
// Potentiometer:        Speed/Sound Control connected to Analog 0
// DFRobot Sound Sensor: Microphone Sound Sensor connected to Analog 2

// Writen by:    Dovadil

// DISCAIMER: I am a very amateur programmer, so please dont judge the probably unnecessarily complicated code.
//            I just had an idea and made it happen. I hope you can use bits and pieces of this for your own project.
//            SHARE IT !!!

//constants for the button press input and 1 led output
const int buttonPin = 11;     // the number of the pushbutton pin
const int ledPin =  13;      // the number of the LED pin

//const_variable for the pot and Sound Sensor
const int analogInPin = A0;  // Analog input pin that the potentiometer is attached to
const int analogInPinSound = A2;  // Analog input Sound Sensor
int potValue = 0;        // value read from the pot
int time = 100;          // time interval

//varibales
boolean initialise=true;
int buttonState = 0;         // variable for reading the pushbutton status
int mode = 0;
int soundVal = 0;
int soundPotThresholdValue = 0;
int soundSensitivityLimit=0;
int x;
int y;
int z;

void setup()
{
  // initialize serial communications at 9600 bps:
  Serial.begin(9600); 
  // The EL channels are on pins 2 through 9
  // Initialize the pins as outputs
  pinMode(2, OUTPUT);  // channel A
  pinMode(3, OUTPUT);  // channel B
  pinMode(4, OUTPUT);  // channel C
  pinMode(5, OUTPUT);  // channel D 
  pinMode(6, OUTPUT);  // channel E
  pinMode(7, OUTPUT);  // channel F
  pinMode(8, OUTPUT);  // channel G
  pinMode(9, OUTPUT);  // channel H
  // We also have two status LEDs, pin 10 on the Escudo,
  pinMode(10, OUTPUT);  
  // and ledPin(pin 13) on the Arduino itself
  pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(buttonPin, INPUT);
}

void loop()
{
  //Start program with a single run of LED illumination
  if (initialise==true)
  {
    delay(10);
    Serial.println("");
    Serial.println("");   
    Serial.println("Initialising...");    
    Serial.println("");
    int status;
    // Step through all eight EL channels (pins 2 through 9)
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);    // turn LED on
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);         // turn the EL channel on
      delay(100);                    // wait for 1/10 second
      digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);     // turn LED off
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);          // turn the EL channel off
      delay(50);                     // wait for 1/10 second
      digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);    // turn LED on
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);         // turn the EL channel on
      delay(100);                    // wait for 1/10 second
      digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);     // turn LED off
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);          // turn the EL channel off
      delay(50);
      //stops running of initialisation after one iteration
      initialise=false;
    }
    Serial.println("");   
    Serial.println("Initialisation DONE!");    
    Serial.println("Waiting for Mode trigger");
  }
  detail();

  //=================MODE 1(Step through all eight EL channels)==================
  if (mode==1)
  {
    // Step through all eight EL channels (pins 2 through 9)
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);   // turn the EL channel on
      delay(time);              // wait for 1/10 second
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);    // turn the EL channel off
    }
  }

  //=================MODE 2(fill up from bottom then empty from bottom)==================
  if (mode==2)
  {
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);   // turn the EL channel on
      delay(time);        // wait for 1/10 second
    }
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);   // turn the EL channel on
      delay(time);        // wait for 1/10 second
    }
  }

  //=================MODE 3(up down up down)==================
  if (mode==3)
  {
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);   // turn the EL channel on
      delay(time);        // wait for 1/10 second
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);    // turn the EL channel off
    }
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      y=11-x;
      digitalWrite(y, HIGH);   // turn the EL channel on
      delay(time);        // wait for 1/10 second
      digitalWrite(y, LOW);    // turn the EL channel off
    }
  }

  //=================MODE 4(sweep in bottom to top , sweep out top to bottom)==================
  if (mode==4)
  {
    for(x = 2; x <= 9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);
      delay(time);
    }
    for(x = 9; x >= 2; x--)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);
      delay(time);
    }
  }

  //=================MODE 5(stack and unstack)==================
  if (mode==5)
  {
    for (x = 2; x <= 9; x++)
    {
      for (y = 9; y >= x; y--)
      {
        digitalWrite(y, HIGH);
        delay(time);
        digitalWrite(y, LOW);
        detail();  
      }
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);
    }
    for (x = 9; x >= 2; x--)
    {
      for (y = x; y <= 9; y++)
      {
        digitalWrite(y, HIGH);
        delay(time);             
        digitalWrite(y, LOW);     
        detail();
      }
    }
    digitalWrite(y, LOW);
    delay(time+20);
  }

  //=================MODE 6(alternate flashing)==================
  if (mode==6)
  {
    detail();
    digitalWrite(2, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(4, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(6, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(8, HIGH);
    delay(time+75);
    detail();
    digitalWrite(2, LOW);
    digitalWrite(4, LOW);
    digitalWrite(6, LOW);
    digitalWrite(8, LOW);
    digitalWrite(3, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(5, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(7, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(9, HIGH);
    delay(time+75);
    detail();
    digitalWrite(3, LOW);
    digitalWrite(5, LOW);
    digitalWrite(7, LOW);
    digitalWrite(9, LOW);
  }

  //=================MODE 7(criss cross)==================
  if (mode==7)
  {
    for (x = 2; x <= 9; x++)
    {
      y=11-x;
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
      digitalWrite(y, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
      if (x==5)
      {
        delay(time/2);
      }
      else
      {
        delay(time);
      }
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);
      digitalWrite(y, LOW);
      detail();  
    }  
  }  

  //=================MODE 8(Sound Mode) ==================
  if (mode==8)
  {
    // Sound test
    detailSound();
    if ((soundVal,DEC) == 512)
    {
      //sound flash up
      for(x = 2; x <= 9; x++)
      {
        digitalWrite(x, HIGH);
        delay(40);
      }
      for(x = 9; x >= 2; x--)
      {
        digitalWrite(x, LOW);
        delay(40);
      }
    } 
  }

  //=================MODE 9 ==================
  if (mode==9)
  {
    runAllSequences();
  }

  //=================MODE 10 ==================
  if (mode==10)
  {
  }
}

// =========================================
// =============== FUNCTIONS ===============
// =========================================

void detail()
{
  // read the analog in value and map it to the range for the time
  if ((mode == 8) || (mode == 0)) //if not in Sound mode, or if program has not just begun
  {
    // do nothing
  }
  else
  {
    if ((potValue != analogRead(analogInPin))) //pot is not being changed
    {
      time = map(potValue, 0, 1024, 40, 200);
      // print the results to the serial monitor:
      Serial.print("\n Potentiometer = " );                     
      Serial.print(potValue);    
      Serial.print("\t Time Delay = ");    
      Serial.print(time); 
      Serial.print(" milliseconds");
      // wait 2 milliseconds before the next loop
      // for the analog-to-digital converter to settle
      // after the last reading:
      delay(2);  
      potValue = analogRead(analogInPin);
    }
  }
  // read the state of the pushbutton value:
  buttonState = digitalRead(buttonPin);
  if (buttonState == HIGH)
  {
    buttonPressed();
    digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
  }  
}

void detailSound()
{
  soundPotThresholdValue = analogRead(analogInPin); //threshold
  soundSensitivityLimit = map(soundPotThresholdValue, 0, 1024, 0, 512);
  soundVal=analogRead(analogInPinSound); //actual sound value
  if (soundVal > soundSensitivityLimit)
  {
    Serial.print("\n Threshold Level =   " );
    Serial.println(soundSensitivityLimit);  
    Serial.print("\n Sound Input Level = " );
    Serial.println(soundVal);   
    digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);    
    for(x = 2; x <= 9; x++)
    {
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);
      delay(15);
    }
    for(x = 2; x <= 9; x++)
    {
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);
      delay(15);
    }
  }
  digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
  delay(10);
}

void buttonPressed()
{    
  digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
  delay(300);             // pause to control the program. ensuring single mode change
  mode = mode + 1;        // increment Mode
  if (mode>9)             // if mode is greater than 9, restart from mode 1
  {
    mode=1;
    Serial.println("");
    Serial.println("Resetting Mode Sequence");
    Serial.println("");
    for (x=0;x<=3;x++)
    {
      digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
      delay(100);
      digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
      delay(100);
      digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
    }
  }
  Serial.println("");
  Serial.println("");   
  Serial.println("Button Pressed");    
  Serial.print("Mode: ");    
  Serial.print(mode);    
  Serial.println("");
  for(x=2;x<=9;x++)        //turn all channels off - reset for next loop
  {
    digitalWrite(x, LOW);        
  }
  //if mode is sound mode, blink led 10 times quickly
  if (mode==8) //sound
  {
    for(x=0;x<=10;x++)        //turn all channels off - reset for next loop
    {
      digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
      delay(50);
      digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
      delay(25);
    }
  }    
}
void runAllSequences()
{
  //=================MODE 1(step through all 8 channels)==================
  for (z = 0; z <=7; z++) //because this is relatively short sequence, do it a few times times
  {
    // Step through all eight EL channels (pins 2 through 9)
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);   // turn the EL channel on
      delay(time);              // wait for 1/10 second
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);    // turn the EL channel off
    }
  }
  for(x=2;x<=9;x++)        //turn all channels off - reset for next loop
  {
    digitalWrite(x, LOW);        
  }

  //=================MODE 2(fill up from bottom then empty from bottom)==================
  for (z = 0; z <=3; z++) //because this is relatively short sequence, do it a few times times
  {
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);   // turn the EL channel on
      delay(time);        // wait for 1/10 second
    }
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);   // turn the EL channel on
      delay(time);        // wait for 1/10 second
    }
  }
  for(x=2;x<=9;x++)        //turn all channels off - reset for next loop
  {
    digitalWrite(x, LOW);        
  }

  //=================MODE 3(up down up down)==================
  for (z = 0; z <=3; z++) //because this is relatively short sequence, do it a few times times
  {
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);   // turn the EL channel on
      delay(time);        // wait for 1/10 second
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);    // turn the EL channel off
    }
    for (x=2; x<=9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      y=11-x;
      digitalWrite(y, HIGH);   // turn the EL channel on
      delay(time);        // wait for 1/10 second
      digitalWrite(y, LOW);    // turn the EL channel off
    }
  }
  for(x=2;x<=9;x++)        //turn all channels off - reset for next loop
  {
    digitalWrite(x, LOW);        
  }

  //=================MODE 4(sweep in bottom to top , sweep out top to bottom)==================
  for (z = 0; z <=3; z++) //because this is relatively short sequence, do it a few times times
  {
    for(x = 2; x <= 9; x++)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);
      delay(time);
    }
    for(x = 9; x >= 2; x--)
    {
      detail();
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);
      delay(time);
    }
  }
  for(x=2;x<=9;x++)        //turn all channels off - reset for next loop
  {
    digitalWrite(x, LOW);        
  }

  //=================MODE 5(stack and unstack)==================
  for (z = 0; z <=3; z++) //because this is relatively short sequence, do it a few times times
  {
    for (x = 2; x <= 9; x++)
    {
      for (y = 9; y >= x; y--)
      {
        digitalWrite(y, HIGH);
        delay(time);
        digitalWrite(y, LOW);
        detail();  
      }
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);
    }
    for (x = 9; x >= 2; x--)
    {
      for (y = x; y <= 9; y++)
      {
        digitalWrite(y, HIGH);
        delay(time);             
        digitalWrite(y, LOW);     
        detail();
      }
    }
    digitalWrite(y, LOW);
    delay(time+20);
  }
  for(x=2;x<=9;x++)        //turn all channels off - reset for next loop
  {
    digitalWrite(x, LOW);        
  }

  //=================MODE 6(alternate flashing)==================
  for (z = 0; z <=10; z++) //because this is a short sequence, do it may times
  {
    detail();
    digitalWrite(2, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(4, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(6, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(8, HIGH);
    delay(time+75);
    detail();
    digitalWrite(2, LOW);
    digitalWrite(4, LOW);
    digitalWrite(6, LOW);
    digitalWrite(8, LOW);
    digitalWrite(3, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(5, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(7, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(9, HIGH);
    delay(time+75);
    detail();
    digitalWrite(3, LOW);
    digitalWrite(5, LOW);
    digitalWrite(7, LOW);
    digitalWrite(9, LOW);
  }
  for(x=2;x<=9;x++)        //turn all channels off - reset for next loop
  {
    digitalWrite(x, LOW);        
  }

  //=================MODE 7(criss cross)==================
  for (z = 0; z <=10; z++) //because this is a short sequence, do it may times
  {
    for (x = 2; x <= 9; x++)
    {
      y=11-x;
      digitalWrite(x, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)

      digitalWrite(y, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
      if (x==5)
      {
        delay(time/2);
      }
      else
      {
        delay(time);
      }
      digitalWrite(x, LOW);
      digitalWrite(y, LOW);
      detail();  
    }  
  }
  for(x=2;x<=9;x++)        //turn all channels off - reset for next loop
  {
    digitalWrite(x, LOW);        
  }
}

Step 8: Summary

Picture of Summary
This is a relatively big build, and I hope some of you manage to take something away from this and create your own magical flashy device.

Have fun, enjoy and SHARE !

Peace
gengas1 year ago

I used this guide to make a light suit. Thank you so much for this great information.

http://www.reddit.com/r/somethingimade/comments/22fpkf/i_built_an_el_wire_light_suit/

dovadil (author)  gengasyesterday

Yeaaaah - Awesome - it gives me so much pleasure to see people taking this design and making it their own.

tanders01042 years ago
Dovadil, you did an incredible job of detailing your instructions. I built this and it was the first electronic build I have done. It worked on the first go! The only thing I changed was I used CAT 5 connectors from the brain to the hat so I can unplug it from there. My next job is to use the brain on another EL wire outfit and I can just plug that into the CAT5 . Cudos to you. i'll work on getting video and pictures up.
dovadil (author)  tanders01042 years ago
Wow tanders0104 - You have no idea how much pleasure it gives me, and what a complement it is, to know that someone else has built and benefited from this instructable.
I like the idea of using RJ-45 connectors. I really would give you loads more versatility with the concept.
ctuck2 years ago
Holy moly, my EL Escudo looks way different than yours!! Plus you seem to be able to light all the channels. When did you order yours? Nice looking results!
ctuck ctuck2 years ago
Aha it's the Dos! A new model that looks much more improved over the first. Guess I will be making anew SparkFun order! I can finally make my 8 Segment EL Wire project work!
dovadil (author)  ctuck2 years ago
Yeah, from what I have read, the Dos was a huge improvement.
ctuck dovadil2 years ago
Sure looks like it. I ordered one last week, should arrive soon. I have lots of EL projects I was really hopeful for that were all dashed by the week EL Escudo. The Dos should be a pleasant change.
J-Five2 years ago
GROOVY!!!

I want one!!!!!!!!!!
J-Five J-Five2 years ago
Also it’s a great conversation starter!
dovadil (author)  J-Five2 years ago
You have no idea :)
J-Five dovadil2 years ago
Next, try making an entire outfit with them. That would be VERY intresting.
jsargent12 years ago
GREAT idea, i wanna have a shot of making it, but with a more compact remote design, and maybe some light material to cover the lights, so they aren't visible til they are on :)
dovadil (author)  jsargent12 years ago
jsargent1 - Thank you.
Yes, the remote - I find the size to be okay, but this hat was my first full Arduino project and at the time, it was made before I explored wireless and XBee options. Obviously having less cables would be ideal, but with the time restriction of getting the build done before a festival, I decided to go down the route I knew the best, and this was using wire.
Also, if the hat is made quite tidily, it actually looks quite psychedelic, even during the day.
During your recreation, please let me know of any improvements/short-cuts along the way on my Orangeboard.
Cheers,
Dovadil
Q2WERTY2 years ago
Awesome !!! nice detailed explanation.
dovadil (author)  Q2WERTY2 years ago
Thank Q2WERTY. This Instructable was composed and published only after I had built this psychedelic fashion accessory, so I have tried to be as detailed as possible.
I hope you manage to make use of some parts of this build and make something of your own. I have learnt a fortune from instructables.com (without which, this concept would never have materialised)
mnurek2 years ago
This is AMAZING!! Dovadil are you single??
dovadil (author)  mnurek2 years ago
Thank's mnurek - I'm flattered, but this isn't really the right place for this type of conversation ;)
zshaunz2 years ago
This is AWESOME!
I hope you win
pietzeekoe2 years ago
Might wanna put a low pass filter on the microphone otherwise when there is loud music playing its just permanently on.
dovadil (author)  pietzeekoe2 years ago
Thank you for this tip. That is a really good idea. I will probably implement this into mk1.1
Guchiwoochi2 years ago
Nice Hat! I might make one for a party!
dovadil (author)  Guchiwoochi2 years ago
Cool - go for it. Was definitely worth the effort.