Instructables
Picture of ELEV-8
Parallax's Quadcopter Kit, the ELEV-8, is a great way to get into flying RC. The build is fairly simple and you'll end up with an awesome quad that's stable, maneuverable, and quick. For now, you can purchase this kit directly from Parallax, but we'll have it in the Maker Shed soon!

Scroll down to the "Downloads and Resources" section on Parallax's product page for an awesome list of helpful resources, and watch videos of it in action here.

Throughout this build, please refer to Parallax's Assembly Diagrams (here). I'll be referring to each page in these instructions. If you've never built a quad (or done RC) before, definitely take a look at Hoverfly's awesome video tutorial series, found here.

At the end of Parallax's text Assembly Guide, in Figure 2, you can see the basic idea behind flying multirotors with an even number of motors: the direction of spin alternates to counteract the torque and automatic yaw of the copter (this is the function of the tail rotor on normal helicopters). By varying the speed at which each motor spins, we can accurately control throttle (altitude), yaw, pitch, and roll, all while staying stable. We'll be building in the "X" configuration.










Tools
      
Phillips screwdriver
Soldering iron solder
Wire stripper
wire snips


Relevant Parts
sded
ELEV-8 Quadcopter Kit
Wireless Transmitter
RC Radio
LiPo Battery
 
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Step 1:

Picture of
2.jpg
3.jpg
Turn to page 1 of Parallax's Assembly Diagrams document, and start assembling your motors! Our set screws were already Loctited in place, but check to make sure yours are as well with a small Allen key before proceeding.


See those black spacers that came with the props? Punch the middle one out and press into the backside of each prop before installation. Remember, two rotate counterclockwise and two rotate clockwise. The tiny text should be facing up once they're mounted.
rittersport2 years ago
Awesome! I think it looks Great!!!
zacker2 years ago
Do you do anything to cover (insulate) the exposed portions of the connectors, I see that there is a good anount of connector showing and it looks like there are two that are touching each other. do you wrap them in electricle tape or something?
zacker2 years ago
I'm really digging those motor mounts.. they would work nicly on my Tri copter i bet.
dchall82 years ago
I really like Instructables about flying objects.  Thanks for posting this one.

Is it just me or did all of your links lose their link?
I8mAll2 years ago
I wonder, could you tell us the total cost of a setup?
eissaselem (author)  I8mAll2 years ago
The total cost of setting $ 550
aeszok2 years ago
I don't think people are aware that this kit costs several hundred dollars, I think it's $600USD. I believe this instructable is to assist anyone who buys it, as it is generally for experienced RC hobbyists.
eissaselem (author)  aeszok2 years ago
The total cost of setting $ 550
joen2 years ago
Do you have a link to Parallax's web site?
Now to just make it support more weight and make it bigger.
eissaselem (author) 2 years ago
Parallax's Quadcopter Kit, the ELEV-8, is a great way to get into flying RC. The build is fairly simple and you'll end up with an awesome quad that's stable, maneuverable, and quick. For now, you can purchase this kit directly from Parallax, but we'll have it in the Maker Shed soon!

Scroll down to the "Downloads and Resources" section on Parallax's product page for an awesome list of helpful resources, and watch videos of it in action here.

Throughout this build, please refer to Parallax's Assembly Diagrams (here). I'll be referring to each page in these instructions. If you've never built a quad (or done RC) before, definitely take a look at Hoverfly's awesome video tutorial series, found here.

At the end of Parallax's text Assembly Guide, in Figure 2, you can see the basic idea behind flying multirotors with an even number of motors: the direction of spin alternates to counteract the torque and automatic yaw of the copter (this is the function of the tail rotor on normal helicopters). By varying the speed at which each motor spins, we can accurately control throttle (altitude), yaw, pitch, and roll, all while staying stable. We'll be building in the "X" configuration.