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You can find a DIY wedding tutorial on almost anything at this point. And yet I've noticed that there really isn't much in the flower girl department other then tutu dresses. I wanted to contribute some of what I know to help with the lack of sewing guides out there. Not to mention, finding the right flower girl dress at the right price is not an easy task. Being able to make one on your own might just get you what you want for a lot less money.

This flower girl tutorial is for a stretch lace dress. It can easily adapt to other fabrics as well. This is simply a foundation for you guys to build off of.

Step 1: Materials

The amount of materials will depend on the size of the girl. My daughter is 8 so you might need to add fabric accordingly. I used a nice bridal lace and a very soft stretch knit cotton.

Materials-

  • 1 yard stretch lace
  • 1 yard knit lining
  • Matching thread
  • A tank top that fits your child now



Recommended tools-

  • Scissors
  • Seam ripper
  • Rotary blade
  • Cutting board
  • Pencil
  • Wrapping paper

Step 2: Making the Bodice Pattern

What makes this dress so easy that you will make the bodice pattern from a top that already fits your child right now. This ensures that you will get a great fit without the headache.

First you will turn it inside out. Then fold the top in half at the center front, like pictured. Place the center front on the straight edge of the wrapping paper. Trace around the edges of the top and be sure to pull the edges flat as you go. I used the same pattern for the front and back. You can cut the front neckline deeper that the back and make two separate pattern pieces.

After you've got it traced you will add a seam allowance around the edges. Mark the center front "cut on fold."

Cut (2) linings
Cut (2) lace

Step 3: Sewing the Bodice

First you will place one lace bodice and one lining bodice with right sides together. Pin the armhole and the neck line. Repeat with the other two.

Sew along the neckline and both armholes of each. Turn them inside out and press the seams. You can top stitch the neckline and armhole to stabilize them. I chose not to for mine. Repeat this on other side. This is when you will want to pin it and try it on your child to make sure you have a good fit. You can baste the seams together to make sure that it goes over the head easily.

After the bodice neckline and armholes are pressed you will place them with right sides together and sew the shoulder and side seams. Serge the edges if possible. Try the bodice on again and make sure it fits well.

Step 4: Cutting the Skirt

While your child is wearing the bodice you just made, you will measure from the bottom of the bodice to the top of the knee. This will be the length of the skirt. Add seam allowance accordingly.

Fold your lace in half so the selvage edges are touching. If you don't have a big cutting board fold again. Cut the edge so it is straight. Now measure the skirt length and cut. Mine was at 18". You should have a long piece and the width should be your desired length.

Now take the long piece of fabric and fold it in half. Cut at the fold so you have two equal pieces. Repeat with the lining. Cut off the selvage edges. Measure the lengths and make sure the length of the two lining pieces and the length of the two lace pieces are the same.

Step 5: Sewing the Skirt

Sew the two side seams of the lace together with right sides touching. Repeat with the lining.

With the wrong side of the lace on top of the right side of the lining, pin together along the upper edge. Sew a gathering stitch at the top of each side. Pull the top thread only to gather the skirt. Make sure it gathers nice and evenly.

Turn the skirt inside out so the lace is inside. Take the bodice and put it inside the skirt so the right sides of the lace are touching. Pin at each side seam. Then even out the gathers and pin the rest of the skirt to the bodice. Sew all the way around. Serge the edges and your done!

You can hem the lace if you'd like but a lot of lace out there doesn't fray.

Step 6: Lace Flower Girl Dress

This dress looks great with a ribbon and the fabric I used has sequins in it so it sparkles when you move. Some cowboy boots and a flower and shes ready for a summer wedding. Beautiful and so easy to make. You could use tulle instead of lace and add extra layers to the bottom for fullness. There are so many different ways to modify it.

The best part is that you can apply this same exact pattern to adult dresses as well. As long as you are using stretch fabrics and making the pattern with something that fits you well, everything else applies. I hope I get to see some of your DIY dresses using this instructable :)

<p>I really wanted to stitch it a flower dress for my niece but I just end up buying flower dress for my little girl who is going to be bridesmaid inmy nephew's wedding. As I was in a bit hurry, so I ordered it online from <a href="http://www.mygirldress.com/" rel="nofollow">My Girl Dress</a>. I was able to fetch 2 good dresses under 100$. But, I have pinned this page so I can gift her an elegant dress made by me.</p><p>Loved the detailed explanation.</p>
I am new at stiching and am going to try it out. I have slight problem adjusting the tension of the thread. Most of the time the fabric gets puckered..... Do you hv tips for lace fabrics?
<p>When the tension is too tight it can cause puckering. Sewing with lace can vary in difficultyy but I've found it to be pretty easy. The finer laces require a delicate hand. Here is a link with really good overview for tension problems - http://www.threadsmagazine.com/item/4302/understanding-thread-tension/page/all</p>
Thanks will look it up. Congrats on making it to the finals
I am new at stiching and am going to try it out. I have slight problem adjusting the tension of the thread. Most of the time the fabric gets puckered..... Do you hv tips for lace fabrics?
I loved this tutorial..... Voted!
<p>That is just the cutest dress and you make it so easy for recreating :)</p>
<p>Thank you! I'm glad to hear that, I was hoping it would show that sewing can be really simple. :)</p>

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Bio: I've always had a tendency to make things rather than buy. When your design aesthetic never seems to work with your budget you end ... More »
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