Instructables
Picture of Easy Pot Rack
After an eternity of dealing with a closet with a big mess of pots & pans, I decided it was time to solve that problem once and for all.

Being, in the tradition of my favorite kinetic sculptor, Jean Tinguely, a bricoleur, the plan was to use objects I found around the house to make something useful. So, with an afternoon, a plank of wood and a couple of bits from Ikea I had lying around, I went to work. The chain, nuts & bolts I sourced from a local hardware store.

 
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Step 1: What I used...

Picture of What I used...
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In addition to the leftover stair tread I found in the garage, I used the following hardware:
  • 2x IKEA GRUNDTAL Rail, 20 3/4"
  • 4x Screw Eyelet, 5/16-18
  • 4x Bolt Eyelet, 1/4-20
  • 4x Nylock Nut, 1/4-20
  • 10ft. Light Duty Chain

Step 2: Pre-Drilling and Mounting the Rails

Picture of Pre-Drilling and Mounting the Rails
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So it happened that I had a couple of those super-cheap GRUNDTAL rails bars lying around after moving, and since they're so stout and intended to be used with some pretty nice little S-hooks, I surmised that they'd be perfect for my pot rack.

I got started by assembling the rails, checking the length of the screws I had lying around for length (to ensure I wouldn't punch all the way through my plank) and marked them off.

As you can see, I predrilled the holes with my drill press and prepped them for the next step.

Step 3: The hanging eyelets

Picture of The hanging eyelets
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After checking the alignment of my drilled holes, I marked and drilled the corners for inserting the eyelets.

Because the eyelets were closed, I put them one by one in the vise and bent them open so that I could hang the whole business from the lengths of chain.

After that was complete, I screwed the GRUNDTAL rails into the plank, completing the pot rack.


Step 4: The Chains

Picture of The Chains
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After tracking down my bolt cutters, I snipped the 10' chain length into 4 2.5' sections. I left those long so that I could be sure I had some wiggle room in the final mounting. I also used a vise to bend them open to facilitate hanging them with the chain.

this is gorgeous!

craftclarity (author)  garnishrecipes2 months ago
Thanks! Glad you like it. I was going to shorten the chains a little bit, but my bro-in-law said he liked the "punk rock" look, so it's staying. :)
BLUEFOOable2 months ago

Been looking to make one of these. Except only a slimmer version. Do need one. Great instructable though.

Wow....useful one for every home :)

jumbleview2 months ago

Nice idea and straight implementation. Will show to my wife: she need something similar. (And thank you for commenting my project BTW).

Claptrap made it!3 months ago

Good one - I used a similar method. I used 2 old timber bedrails (beautiful close grained coachwood) and a length of 1" dowel to create the rack. Butchers hooks chains and magnetic knife racks came from the local hardware shop.

The missus was rapt.

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antagonizer5 months ago

Very awesome. The gif at the end is a nice touch. I've been thinking about making one for the last year now so thanks for putting a fire under my butt.

craftclarity (author)  antagonizer5 months ago

Thanks! As one often hears, "necessity is the mother of invention".

XmasOlive6 months ago

LUV THIS!!! make more things please...!

LexaMerica6 months ago
Love it
sunshiine7 months ago

You make it look so easy! thanks for sharing!

sunshiine