Instructables
Picture of Easy to Build WIFI 2.4GHz Yagi Antenna

This antenna will extend the range of your WiFi or 2.4GHz devices (like surveillance cameras) into many miles and kilometers. A yagi antenna is basically a telescope for radio waves. I tired the pringle can antenna and the Yagi beats it hands down in performance.
 
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Step 1: What You Need


This is an absolutely easy project.

You need an ink jet printer/ Computer
Popsicle sticks
White glue
Crazy glue
Big paper clips (you could use any stiff solid metal wire instead)
USB WIFI, preferably with an antenna extension OR a 2.4 GHz device
soldering iron and lead
Sanding papers
Scissors
Pliers or preferably a nibbler (see photo below, available at radio shack)
a metric ruler with millimeters or a metric caliper.

Step 2: Building Overview

Picture of Building Overview
Capture.PNG

The building steps are simple:

1. Print out the scaled Yagi antenna template* (download from next step).
2. Trim paper clips to size and glue them to the template.
3. Use Popsicle sticks to build the antenna's backbone and hold it together.
4. Connect the USB device to the antenna.

*I used a Yagi modeler java applet to generate the diagram. This modeler applet is found on many websites (google "yagi modeler") and its owner is W9CF.

The modeler gives a diagram and the elements' lengths and position. I carefully scaled the diagram and turned it into a template in order to make the building process easy.

You can visit AB9IL awesome website  to get more details on using the modeler for this 15 element Yagi and other fine antenna projects, such as a 20 element WIFI Yagi .
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Saarducci11 months ago
Okay well I read through the entire post and I saw many things that made a lot of sense, also saw a lot of unnecessary flaming, but I do have a few comments to make. Right off the bat the one individual that asked about having his modem in the basement with a rotating antenna on the roof needs a reality check. Overlooked in the connecting the USB dongle to the antenna was the transmission line length, for these frequencies it should be as short as possible and a multiple of 1/2 wavelength I'd suggest as close to 2.41 inches as one could manage (use a small diameter 50 ohm coax). Take the dongle apart and connect a USB extension cable to it and mount it directly on the antenna assembly. Paper clips vs copper, at this frequency it's not going to make much difference, however the specific model was generated using 14awg copper. Someone said glue it all to cardboard then cover it with more cardboard actually a strong and stable design, original author said build around popsicle sticks(wooden), both are subject to absorbing moisture from the air and either can have a poor dielectric constant, I would suggest some kind of plastic (they make popsicles with plastic sticks). The lengths of the elements, the spacing between them, and keeping them all in the same plane and parallel to each other is the most important consideration. The driven element, #2 in this design: that one I would make from 14awg copper, I'd make a simple dipole rather than a folded dipole, I would take two pieces of wire make 90 degree bends in them cut the bent part to about 1/8 inch and attach my transmission line. Take a piece of heat shrink cut two notches in it about 1/4 inch apart and insert the wires into it and shrink it, maybe reinforce the space in the center (break a tooth from my comb and stick it in the middle before heating the shrink?) cut it down to the correct overall length and insert it last. If you use the folded dipole make sure the folded part is perpendicular to the plane of the rest of the antenna and use 300 ohm twin lead to connect to the dongle, but your SWR will probably be much higher, reducing your effective gain and possibly resulting in early failure of the dongle. Horizontal vs vertical, after you have your antenna connected and have connected to some network you can try rotating it about its horizontal axis to see if you can get a better aspect on the other antenna (more bars). All in all though good job to Biotele, it's cheap, it's easy, and if done right will provide excellent results. I did not build this antenna, but I built 2 antennae very similar before reading this post, My son and I live almost 2 miles apart and either of us can stream 1080p movies from the other's house during a thunderstorm.

I think you could make an instructable out of all that :D

ya welad el metnaka 7ad yerod 3ala den omy :D

plz reply me

what are the dimensions between every metal piece

amalshaji made it!23 days ago

Please Help me , My problem is that how to connect coaxial cable to router. I made the antenna with a long piece of plastic. I plan to connect it via coaxial RG-6 F to my router because SMA and N type connectors are not available in my place. I also made a balun with folded coaxial (like a horseshoe) so that the impedance mismatch may be rectified. My router has a fixed antenna( photo attached).The router has only one antenna solder point but the coaxial have central wire and outer braiding. Do I need to connect both or only the central element. Any help would be appreciated.

C360_2014-08-05-11-42-34-288.jpgC360_2014-08-05-12-10-55-466.jpgD0028.jpg
Jackzuky6 months ago

wait so your not supose to connect any of the other paper clips

Jackzuky6 months ago

thanks your a life saver

michi9 months ago
Please provide better pictures, I can see absolutely nothing here...: Step 7: Connect the Antenna to the Wifi Modem, first picture. Which wire goes were?
michi9 months ago
I did built this antenna, but it does not work. There is absolutely no gain. Instead it is worse then before.
It is also not clear how you need to solder the antenna to the board. One wire, two wires?
brian-kn1 year ago
Hi Having made the antenna how or what do i need to connect it to my laptop to increase the extra antenna power, Kind Regards Brian UK
brian-kn1 year ago
Hi, I thank you very much for the reply about the antenna wiring it is more clear now that you have explained, Kind Regards Brian UK
brian-kn1 year ago
Hi can the wires from the yagi antenna be connected with the wires in a a usb connecter and connect directly into my laptop. kind regards brian
If you mean just soldering a USB connector on to the feedline for this antenna, no, that won't work. You still need something to handle the actual generation and reception of the wireless signal.

However, if you mean connecting the antenna to a USB wireless adaptor, that's possible, provided you connect the feedline from the antenna to the antenna connector on the wireless adaptor. If the adaptro doesn't have one, you'd have to tear it apart and find where the internal antenna was connected.
popefelix1 year ago
If you mean just soldering a USB connector on to the feedline for this antenna, no, that won't work. You still need something to handle the actual generation and reception of the wireless signal.

However, if you mean connecting the antenna to a USB wireless adaptor, that's possible, provided you connect the feedline from the antenna to the antenna connector on the wireless adaptor. If the adaptro doesn't have one, you'd have to tear it apart and find where the internal antenna was connected.
Can i use a wire if so what is the diameter. Thank you
Biotele (author)  sololife.sai2 years ago
Of course, it has to be stiff and solid. I don't think it has to be exactly a certain diameter. Maybe someone with antenna theory can enlighten us further.
I think a larger diameter wire will result in a larger bandwith antenna.
For a router with 2 antennas, why not build 2 yagi's and stack them?
A stacked phased array just like the EME array's for moon bounce.

I have a major problems that needs solving quick: how exactly do i connect the driven element to the antenna? as you can see, the antenna boom is missing the element, because i popped in my original antenna with the usb card, and worked fine, but not the strongest signal. why didnt it work with the copper wire? because i just took the 2 wires coming off my board, and put them on each end of the element, completely skipping the original antenna? how is the wiring diagram? any help would be greatly appreciated, as im bored of trying to get around the schools internet filter, with this i can mooch off of someone elses:D
DSCN9637.JPG
here is a matching using a piece of coax to get the 300ohm down to 50ohm


http://www.k7mem.com/Electronic_Notebook/antennas/yagi_vhf_feed.html
@kiranrpatil01 if your phone has an external wifi jack, or you plan on opening ypur phone and soldering some lmr-400 cable to your phone and have a 2ft antenna attached, go for it.
here is an online yagi calc for 2.437 ghz, gives more options

http://www.k7mem.com/Electronic_Notebook/antennas/yagi_vhf.html
chrislarkin2 years ago
it did not work because you were completing the circuit at the end of the coaxial cable stopping the signal from traveling through your antena
if this was dc theory, yes, but this is ac theory. the driver element acts much like a loop. just like the old circle uhf antenna, this way is called a folded loop, when the folds are the same distance. dc looks like a short, ac does not.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGdwIXMexCY&feature=rellist&playnext=1&list=PLD7A103946CE9C072

here is another yagi folded antenna with aproprate matching cable for 50 ohms.

if you need a wifi with detachable antenna, alfa on fleebay is a good choice
I would suggest ether placing glue on your sticks and let it dry, or using plastic wrap around the sticks. this will prevent moisture from the wood interfiering with the antenna.
is there any danger by using it ,like licence for WiFi and can it be connected to android mobile to access internet?
for cable ebay 'rp-sma lmr 400' 3ft 1mcable $13 this is the only thing you don't want to skimp on, as it is for these frequency's cable signal loss can eat up the gain.

you can get 'RP-SMA male flange' and connect your antenna to your usb antenna adapters jack, and avoid the cable loss. just mount the driver element so it hooks up at the bottom instead of the top.


.
frankortega2 years ago
I found a company and there antenna are not too expensive, I try to build
two type of antenna in (easybuild2.4 GHz), but still lacking some imformation, and its end up lossing my time, need more information,kind ofcable,connector,and how long
the maximum leght of the cable.
thanks

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Biotele (author)  frankortega2 years ago
I don't understand your question. You build this antenna but you can't connect it to the usn wifi receiver? Can you post a picture of what you build so far? Thanks.
This is router what other info. Do you need?
It has 2 antena like this shows. The metal parts on the side are the antenna. I would like to attach an alligator clip to 1 antenna which should I clip it to? Then I will attach the other end to the Yagi antenna.
linksys_wrt120n_inside.jpg
I have a Cisco wrt120n. It has 2 antenna how do I make the yagi antenna?
jbaker222 years ago
(removed by author or community request)
Biotele (author)  jbaker222 years ago
you can use a 2.4 GHZ coax cable with adapter hooked to your router.
(removed by author or community request)
Biotele (author)  jbaker222 years ago
get a solid piece of copper wire that fits into the router's antenna socket, and connect to one side of the dipole. The wire should short.
It has no socket. I have to solder and hope I don't ruin the router.
nzammit2 years ago
Hey great instructable! It might be a bit off topic but I have a few old disused TV antennas. Could I somehow change those to receiving WIFI? Thanks.
dbartley2 years ago
Anyone with experience of reflections from the coax itself? I built a 4-element vertically polarized 850-MHz Yagi antenna. With the coax dangling haphazardly from the boom behind, there seemed to be tremendous problems. These problems seem to disappear by looping the coax behind from boom to the mast, forming ROUGHLY another half reflector.
The ARRL Antenna Book (Chapter 27, 1991) describes this problem of antenna currents on the transmission lines somewhat. The outside of the coax is actually part of the antenna, being directly attached to an active antenna element, though it is perpendicular in this region. But also its metal further back interacts inductively with other antenna elements in its vicinity. Directing the coax back along the boom, with a large loop (about 1.5 wavelengths) behind and down to the wooden mast improves reception consistency somewhat, rather than haphazard arrangement. But the ideal loop seems to be obtained from the tightest possible. Because of the peculiar geometry and the lack of actual measurement rather than qualitative evaluation, it's hard to understand why this is.
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