Instructables

Edgebander (Edgebanding Machine) - for Laminate or Veneers

Featured
Picture of Edgebander (Edgebanding Machine) - for Laminate or Veneers
IMG_8556.JPG
IMG_8557.JPG
IMG_4933.JPG
IMG_7531.JPG
Edgebanders start at around $300 and run up into the thousands.

This project cost me nothing and saved me hours.

Edgebanding can be boring tedious work, especially when you have hundreds of board feet to band. I made this edgebander when I was making a shelving system for a new walk-in closet and had literally hundreds of feet to band.
 
Remove these adsRemove these ads by Signing Up

Step 1: Parts list/materials

Picture of Parts list/materials
IMG_8551.JPG
IMG_8552.JPG
IMG_8553.JPG
IMG_8554.JPG
Iron (I had an old one laying around)
Sheet of birch plywood or anything with a smooth surface. ( I used mostly birch ply that was left over from another project)
Screws (I used old drywall screws from the gutting of the closet)

Make a plan, your iron will most likely be a different shape than mine. I didn't get too granular with the instructions here. You are basically taking two boards and screwing them together perpendicularly to form an L. You want this L to be long enough to support the average length of board that you will be banding. Mine is 30" long and 8" deep. Most of the boards I was banding were about 24"x16" or at most 16" deep. Cut out a section of the upright part of the L for your iron. I also cut an angled slit for the banding to feed from the spool.

The bottom board should have an 1/8" gap to allow the edgeband to overlap the board edge. See Close up photo. This can be created with a dado on a table saw or use a router, you could also add a layer f ply when assembling the L to create this.

I created my bander at a tilt, so that I wasn't constantly hunched over when operating at average counter height. You can also choose to create yours flat.

After creating the L, I cut pieces of wood with and angle at one end to create the tilt, I then mounted the pieces to a larger board (about 36" x 12") and then mounted the L to these.

You want the work surface to be soft and smooth, I used birch ply that was sanded with a find sand paper such as 200 grit or more. You can also use MDF or laminate for your work surfaces, or you can cover with un-textured laminate (Formica) Make sure you countersink any screws used directly on the work surface, fill and sand holes.

Place your iron on it's side in the section you cut out for this. I cut several pieces of wood to hold the iron in place, you may need some shims to adjust the angle of the iron face, use a framing square to check your angles.

The out feed section of the L (the upright section after the iron) should be long enough to allow the banding to cool after it passes the iron, it should also be sturdy enough to press the banding firmly into the wood. One idea that I didn't implement, was to add 2 or 3 rubber wheels to the out feed side.

I added a small platform with a large dowel to hold the banding spool.
KI0DN9 months ago
Maybe a piece of formica laminated to the outfeed board would reduce the friction. Great idea you have. I'll be doing a lot of banding and this will certainly be better than locking the board in the Workmate and trying to iron the banding freehand. Thanks for sharing.
Randyrandy74 (author)  KI0DN9 months ago
Thanks! I made a desk a few years back and did all the banding freehand, so when it came time to band a few miles of it, I decided there had to be a better way. Has been a great time saver.
padbravo9 months ago
Wow!
I do a lot of banding, but, did not find out the most efficient way to do it... U used some time, some scrap and made something to make an efficient system.

Tks for sharing... I'll try your idea...
BTW: how did you made the cut of the feeder? I does not have a band-saw, and on that angle and that deept...
Randyrandy74 (author)  padbravo9 months ago
Thanks! For the feeder cut I free-handed it with the board in a vise and a circular saw. I currently don't have a band saw either and the angle is too acute for a miter saw. I suppose there are a number of better ways, but that's what I did.
audreyobscura9 months ago
such a great idea!
Pro

Get More Out of Instructables

Already have an Account?

close

PDF Downloads
As a Pro member, you will gain access to download any Instructable in the PDF format. You also have the ability to customize your PDF download.

Upgrade to Pro today!