Introduction: Hand Held Plane - Convert to Mini Jointer

Picture of Hand Held Plane - Convert to Mini Jointer

A simple means to convert an electric plane into a small jointer - good for finishing relatively small pieces of timber

Step 1: Layout and Build

Picture of Layout and Build

Roughly measure your plane and cut timber (or in this case MDF) to size. The aim is to create a u-shaped frame the width of the plane. I left one piece higher on purpose (by about 2 inches or 5cm) to create a "fence" for guiding workpieces.

I then sandwiched the plane in place, clamped the side pieces and screwed the entire assembly together. This is aided by my plane having two flat surfaces on both sides

Step 2: Mounting the Reference Block

Picture of Mounting the Reference Block

I cut a 30 degree angle on a scrap piece of wood and screwed in place. This references against a piece of the plane with a 30 degree internal angle. This holds the plane in perfect position each time

Step 3: Mount the Plane and Finish

Picture of Mount the Plane and Finish

I positioned the plane upside down in its new home and ensured it was square and true to the assembly. I then used short quick release clamps to ensure it can't move during use. As there are no permanent fixtures used, the plane can easily and quickly be removed for hand held use if required.

A note of caution - this will turn your plane into a far more dangerous piece of kit. Beware of fingers, arms, loose clothing etc. And most of all, if you are not confident with this project, do not attempt it. I'd recommend using a push stick or similar when feeding stock through the machine.

Comments

cajunfid (author)2015-06-24

I've thought of doing this a few times but the prospect of having that blade turning without any sort of guard scares the crap out of me.

pudtiny (author)2015-06-21

Nice work, some sort of guard maybe a next project.

DIY Hacks and How Tos (author)2015-06-20

Cool idea. You have some empty steps at the end of your instructable. You might want to delete those so that you don't have a big blank space at the end of your project.

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Bio: I love to make things in the workshop. Find me at makerandco_ on Instagram
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