Electrical Soldering is the basis of all modern electronics.  Although integrated circuits can largely be manufactured without it, they could not be connected to anything else without soldering.

In short, solder is an allow of tin and lead, with a fairly low melting point.  It bonds to most metals when melted, making it useful for permanently connecting two pieces of metal.

You will need:

The printed circuit board (PCB) that you wish to attach an electrical component to and the electrical component.

Solder.  I used 63/37 rosin core solder.  The tube pictured cost about $1 and has 8 feet of solder, enough for almost any project.   *WARNING* Acid core solder can damage electrical component.

A soldering iron.  These come in many shapes and sizes, but are ultimately, nothing more than a bit of metal, a power source and a heating element.

A wet sponge.  Keep some water nearby so you can keep it wet.

Step 1: Place The Component

Printed Circuit Boards have two sides.  Typically, only one side has metal printed on it.

Place the component with its leads through the appropriate holes (deciding which ones are appropriate is beyond the scope of this instruction), with the body of the component on the side without metal printing, and the long ends of the leads on the same side as the metal printing.  If the component does not stay on its own, bend the leads slightly against the sides of the holes they are in.
I've been sOLDERING for a while now , first I had a very bad IRON made in china , then I bought another one for abt USD$5(500PKRS) its company was suoer , not a very good experience , then abt two days ago I bought a goot original ks60r (60 watt IRON), very better but my SOLDER connections on perfboards are nothing like the videos and pics I've seen over internet !! help me please ! I use 60/40 leaded solder(lead60%/tin40%) of diameter 0.8mm. please keep in mind I have and IRON not a station !
just found the solution!!!! I had been sOLDERING on the wrong side of the perfboard for abt 3 months ?
Thank you so much for this great instructable. I really want to get into soldering, and I think that this will really help me out. It would be nice if I could work on some <a href="http://www.midlandelectricsupply.com" rel="nofollow">electrical</a> problems in my home as well.
Great instructable! My husband loves to work with electronics and <a href="http://www.jamesdigregorioelectrician.com" rel="nofollow">electrical</a> gadgets. I will have to point out this instructable to him. He might already know how to solder, but if he doesn't then this is the place to go to learn. Great job! Soldering looks like it takes some hard work and a lot of focus with steady hands.
yes? it`s very interesting... but here you can find something than <a href="http://www.umeluieruki.ru/" rel="nofollow">you can do it self</a>
Hey DUDE ! <br> <br>Many many thanks for this short, neat &amp; tidy introduction into electronics soldering, i'm 34 and always wanted to get into soldering and electronics since i left school, wish i would have done it back then ! <br> <br>Just goes to show that an old Dowg (Me!) can learn new tricks !! <br> <br>Again, many thanks ! <br> <br>;-)
Just wanted to point out something,<br>when you solder, watch out for the wire you could burn using the soldering iron.<br>Exemple, look at the picture 2 of step5, the soldering iron is really close to the wire, and I think the red one started to burn.
In short, solder is an allow of tin and lead, should be <br>In short, solder is an alloy of tin and lead,

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