Introduction: Electrical Cord/cable Management


This will deal with how to manage electrical cords or cables of the sort that get piled up behind your computer desk, audio/video center and cords that you want to store. first off you don't want to manage cords that are fragile or non-flexible in this manner because you could damage the wires inside. but for the right sort of cord (one that can fold back on itself easily) this works well. Another benefit to this technique is that your cords don't end up twisted as they do when coiled.

Step 1: Begin

First untangle the cord and fold it into two equal sizes

Step 2: Repeat

continue to fold cord into smaller and smaller halves, when it is about 8 inches to a foot and a half (depending on preference and size of cord) take the two ends and make a simple through the loop knot.

Step 3: Enjoy

Now the cord is much less of a mess and can be made long again in seconds with minimal tangling.

Thanks for reading!

(This was my first instructable, hope you find it simple and useful)

Comments

author
BlackHatCracker (author)2011-05-26

You guys are right, and this is a great idea.. Just the key thing is as Kozz said, make sure it is loose.. Otherwise you will break the small wires inside the cords. That is not good when that happens.

author
dchall8 (author)2011-05-10

This is outstanding. I started to write up a similar I'ble last year using toilet paper tubes instead of the knot. I could never get the wording right and gave up. You nailed it! Thanks. Stars have been awarded.

I am doing this with my ear buds.  It never occurred to me to try it with the orange extension cords in the garage.  I'll try it next weekend. 

One possible problem with folding the cable all the way to the two ends is the ends could possibly fall through the loop and create a knot.  If you leave the two ends longer, i.e. sticking out, then a knot is less likely to happen. 

author
Kozz (author)2011-05-10

This is a technique I use with some of my heavy-duty extension cords in my garage. Most are 20-25ft long, and I simply "fold" by halves (starting by putting the two business ends beside one another) until I've got a length 3-4ft long, at which point I make an overhand knot (loosely), and then hang it on a hook by the "all bight" end of the overhand knot. I've found that this is easy to un-knot, and unlike a circular coiling, does not impart a twist. to the cord itself.

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