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I have another instructable on here about my electronic drum pad design.

I had to do something different, though, for the bass pedal.

This design is what i came up with.

I'm going to rely on pictures more and text less than in my other instructable.

Step 1: Materials + Tools

I wasn't paying very much attention to what I was doing while building this, I was mostly making it up as I went along. Here's a list of basically what you'll need. (The measurements are mostly relative, and not exact.)

1x - 3/4" wood, 4x12"
1x - 3/4" wood, 4x3.5"
1x - wood, 4x4x3"
2x - 3" metal corner brackets
2x - 1/4" foam, 3x4"
1x - sheet metal, 3x4"
1x - sheet metal, about 3x2"
1x - Peizo sensor (35mm)
1x - RCA style phono jack
2x - legs/"spurs" from acoustic bass drum
Heavy cloth and vinyl for covering.
Screws - long and short


Tools:
Drill + bits (screw drive, 1/2 inch, 1/4 inch, small size for pilot holes for screws.
Saw (I just used a hand saw, but anything will work
Chisel
Screwdrivers
Heavy duty stapler and staples (at least 1/4")
Hot-Glue gun with glue



Step 2: Link

All of the electronics, And the basic design for the vertical face of this pedal, are the same as in my other project, linked here. Electronic Drum Pad

This should explain most of the idea, and the rest of the pictures should help as well.

Step 3: Uncovered Renderings

I forgot to take any pictures while I was building this, and have no pictures of the sensor before it was completed. I did though, make some sketch-up renderings of how it all looks on the inside.

Step 4: All the Rest of the Pictures

Make sure to read the captions for instructions and details.

Step 5: Thanks!

I hope this helps anyone out there looking for ideas for their own DIY edrums.

Feel more than free to comment me for any questions or comments.

Thanks-
Benjamin
Wow!! Really innovative work.Without having much <strong><a href="http://www.ultrasonic-sensor-manufacturer.com/" rel="nofollow">electronic knowledge</a></strong> how could u do this. Heads up to you.
Great Job!!!
Oh wow, you just gave me an awesome idea to make my son's double bass pedal useable with rockband. Just gotta adapt this to use magnetic switches instead of peizo's. Great I'ble!
Wait, do you think i could do it with peizo's if i used a current limiting resistor to protect the controller from the peizo? I know the RB1 controller uses a magnetic switch to read the kick pedal, but it's just that, a switch. If i used a peizo to send the current, rather than switching it, do you think it would work? Or should I built a circuit using a transistor to "read" the peizo and act as the switch? (then I wouldn't have to modify the hammers at all) Anybody have any suggestions?
You could use a microcontroller such as the arduino to read the piezo and trigger a solid state relay or transisor. <br> I made some piezo drum triggers (for acoustic drums) that attach to the drum heads and used the arduino to trigger relays that turn on lights. Whenever our drummer hits a certain drum, the corresponding light turns on for a predetermined length of time. Thats the plan right now but so far i only have the arduino programmed for the bass drum. <br> I have to say when our drummer uses his double kickers with the lights it looks pretty good in the dark! <br>The arduino website: <br>www.arduino.cc <br>you should be able to find almost everything on that website and/or the forum.
Well if you're only using it as the magnet switch, then the entire design would seem very overbuilt. I don't know enough about electronics to be sure whether or not the peizo would work with rockband, but it sounds like a great idea! My electronic knowledge pretty much ends with soldering wires together =P<br/>

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