Instructables
Picture of Everlamp Lamp Base - CNC Mold Manufacturing
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This Instructable focuses on the manufacturing of a mold for the Everlamp - a highly customizable, eco-friendly lamp designed to last a lifetime. Like it on Facebook to receive updates on when it goes for sale.

The Everlamp is not just an open-source lamp, it will also be an open-source company - these plans will give anybody the opportunity to duplicate the business model I am using. While this Instructable focuses on only one part, the instructions can easily be used to manufacture any other part.

I'm assuming you've already decided on a design for your lamp, and are now looking to manufacture it.
It took me about 4 weeks to complete the project with no prior machining experience.

The CAD files used for the part are open-source, and can be accessed below, although it's suggested that you modify them or create new ones to fit your specific needs.
http://grabcad.com/library/everlight

A basic overview follows of how to use mold design and CAM software to control your CNC machinery for this part. A Techshop membership is a relatively inexpensive way to gain access to the machinery and software.
http://www.techshop.ws/index.html

Expect to do a few rounds of iterating between each step, as you'll find that some future steps won't cooperate with your old plans.
  ~Part and Lampshade Design (covered in the previous instructable)
1. Mold Design  (this makes your part)
2. Buying Endmills (cutters) and Material
3. Toolpaths for your CNC Machinery (telling the machine where to cut)
4. Actual Machining
5. Injection Molding
 
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Step 1: Mold Design

Picture of Mold Design
After you've defined your part (the Everlamp in this case), you can use a CAD package with mold design software built in (such as Solidworks or Inventor) to design your mold. Techshop gives free access to Inventor, and students have free access to Solidworks online.

The key things to note here are where you're placing your runner, and the size of your workpiece, as this will reflect on the part you CNC later.