Fast Mayonnaise in a Jar From Olive Oil and Balsamic Vinegar

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Introduction: Fast Mayonnaise in a Jar From Olive Oil and Balsamic Vinegar

A quick way to make delicious real mayonnaise right in the jar

Equipment

  • Immersion Blender
  • measuring spoons
  • 1 pint canning jar

Ingredients

  • olive oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 1-2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • salt

Instructions

  1. Gather together all equipment and ingredients
  2. Crack the eggs into the canning jar
  3. Add salt as desired (around 1 tbsp)
  4. Add 1-2 tbsp of balsamic vinegar
  5. Fill the jar to slightly below the collar with olive oil
  6. Plunge the tip of the immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar
  7. Run the blender at high speed while holding it against the bottom of the jar until a thick emulsion starts to form
  8. Slowly raise the blender tip upward making sure that the oil is combining with the emulsion
  9. Keep raising the tip, gently moving it up and down in small movements
  10. When the entire volume of oil is combined, plunge the tip down and up a few times to homogenize the mayonnaise
  11. Shake off any excess mayonnaise, using a rubber spatula if necessary, to transfer the last dollop of mayonnaise to the jar
  12. Screw the lid on the jar and refrigerate

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  • tried mixing in the ...-hdmotorc

    hdmotorc made it!

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24 Comments

If you use sunflower oil the mayonnaise it will not be cut, with olive oil the result is an strong mayonnaise.

I would like to see if it can con me away from the usual Miracle Whip

Sweet ible!!! Thanks!! Keep up the great work!

Wow! This couldn't be any easier! I think I'm ready to try and make my own! Thanks for the inspiration!

Thank you. Do try it. It is easy. Just remember to start at the bottom of the jar and work upward.

Wow! Ill have to try that. I live in a world where people dont even understand that there is a difference between miracle whip and real mayo. It is sad.. What is the approximate shelf life stored in the fridge? Is the balsamic just a personal touch or is that specific vinegar what gives it the classic mayo taste or could you use any vinegar?

Thanks. I really don't know the shelf life. I use it up within a few weeks. It's best to make a small batch at a time so it is always fresh. I use organic eggs too. Less chance of salmonella. Actually any vinegar and oil will due. I just prefer this combination for a real Italian flavor. For a more 'classic' American taste you could use white vinegar and a neutral oil like corn oil. I wouldn't recommend canola oil. It has a bogus taste IMO and is processed with chemicals.

The standard formula is:

1 cup oil

1 tbsp vinegar

1 egg

salt

Oh OK so it lasts a good while then not just a few days. The last few egg sandwiches I made have been dry, lacking the Mayo. They will b henceforth not lack.

I wouldn't exactly say a good while but a few weeks to be safe. Even though organic eggs have a low likelihood of salmonella contamination, if there is any of the bacteria present, it could incubate and multiply even in the cold refrigerator. I'm sure commercial mayonnaise uses pasteurized eggs but they are not available to the consumer unfortunately.

Interesting. You made me curious about egg pasteurization. Apparently its done in an immersion circulator water bath just below the temp of egg coagulation. I read that The USDA mandates that grade a eggs be washed cleaned, chemically sanitized and dried. Who know whether that happens or not with the eggs in the store. Oddly in Europe eggs labeled grade A must not be washed. I read that that's to promote good animal husbandry, producing clean eggs rather than cleaning dirty eggs. Apparently then the inside of the egg is sterile though one site indicated that bacteria could pass the the pores of an egg shell. I don't really know but I doubt that. I bet the protein in raw eggs is way more bio-available than cooked. Athles drinking raw eggs, etc.