Introduction: Faux Granite Table

This paint process can transform a discarded and worn out piece of wood into a thing of beauty. I am a grandmother without any artist background so if I can do this anyone can.

The beauty of paint is that it can always be changed and just about any surface can be painted. I have chosen a beat up table that I found next to an apartment dumpster. It had definitely seen better days.

If you like this instructable, please vote for me in the Paint It! contest sponsored by Olympic - Thanks

List of materials:

Pint can of Matte Black Primer Paint
3 or 4 Acrylic craft paint bottles (all from same manufacture so they are compatible)
1 sheet of black craft poster board
1 table or other surface to paint
1 package of multiple grit wet or dry sandpaper
Sanding block (optional use a simple block of wood with sandpaper taut against it)
Orbital sander or palm sander (optional – for faster sanding)
Large sea sponge (available in craft stores)
Scissors to cut sea sponge into thirds
Small can of polyurethane
Small sponge roller unit or ultra fine with paint tray one extra fine roller cover
Liner brush to add veining (optional)

Your project can be a dining table, living room table set, bedroom dresser or any piece of furniture with a fairly flat surface.

Step 1: Selecting Your Project

Find a discarded item table or other with flat surface top.

I found mine next to the dumpster but you can find very inexpensive items in a thrift store that have seen better days. Also check your local bookoo.com ads, Penny Saver or Craigslist for freebees or an ultra cheap piece.

Step 2: Assemble Your Materials

Pint can of Matte Black Primer Paint
3 or 4 Acrylic craft paint bottles (all from same manufacture so they are compatible)

1 sheet of black craft poster board

1 table or other surface to paint

1 package of multiple grit wet or dry sandpaper

Sanding block (optional use a simple block of wood with sandpaper taut against it)

Orbital sander or palm sander (optional – for faster sanding)

Large sea sponge (available in craft stores)

Scissors to cut sea sponge into thirds

Small can of polyurethane

Small sponge roller unit or ultra fine with paint tray one extra fine roller cover

Liner brush to add veining (optional)

For some items you might want to add painters tape and newspaper to cover any areas are not painting.

Step 3: Prepare the Surface

Prepare the item by cleaning and sanding as necessary.

Use the courser grits of sandpaper and keep going to a finer grit until you achieve the smoothest possibly surface. If the item has been previously coated with polyurethane or other sealer it will have to be removed. Clean the surface well using a clean cloth. I prefer a microfiber cloth but any lint free cloth will work. Make sure there are no dust particles remaining from your sanding.

Step 4:

Use the roller and paint tray to apply one coat of the black primer to the entire area(s) that are going to be painted. It is seldom necessary to repeat this process. Thoroughly clean the tray, roller arm and roller cover. These clean easily with soap and water.

Step 5: Practice

Use your poster board to practice until you are able to achieve the results you desire for your finished project. Cut the sea sponge into thirds and remove any loose pieces. Use a paper plate (the slick surfaced plates are best). Pour about a 25 to 50 cent puddle of each color near the outside edges of the plate.

Wet your sea sponge with water and wring out thoroughly. Dip the sponge lightly into the darkest color and remove the excess by lightly dabbing on a second paper plate or paper towel. Begin applying that color to the craft board in very light dabs and keep turning the sponge a bit so the same pattern is not repeated. You want the colors to be random. Your practice board allows you to get a good feel of how much pressure you need to achieve the effect you want on your project.

Try the wet on wet method by going immediately to the second color with a different section of sea sponge starting with the lightest color and ending with the darkest color. You can always go back to a lighter color if there is too much dark showing. Also try the dry on dry method by doing a 12x12 area with the first color and waiting a few minutes before applying the second. Use which ever method gives you the desired result.

Always allow a bit of the black to show through. I prefer the dry on dry method which gave me the results you see on the finished table and it was easier because I could paint the entire surface with the first color before adding a second and third color. Try using the liner brush to create veining if you desire. I will add a photo of another project which I added veins to give a more marble like finish instead of granite.

Step 6: The Real Thing

Repeat the same methods you used in practice on the real
thing once the black primer coat is dry.

Step 7: Clean Up

Thoroughly wash out the liner brush (if used) and sea sponges with soap and water as they can be used over and over for another project.

Step 8: Wait Time

Enjoy some free time with a cup of coffee and browse the internet looking for your next project!

Wait about 4 hours for your paints to dry then lightly sand the surface to remove any high spots. Use your hands to feel the surface for smoothness. Then once again thoroughly clean the surface so no residue remains before applying the polyurethane top coat.

Step 9: Top Coat

Apply the water based polyurethane using a second roller cover. Apply the polyurethane with long strokes going in one direction from one side of the surface all the way to the other. Do this fairly quickly but do not go back and forth with your roller being sure not to use too much pressure to avoid roller marks.

Overlap each long stoke slightly. Wait at least 8 hours then lightly sand, thoroughly clean and repeat. You will need at least 2 coats but for longer durability it is preferable to do a third coat and of course sanding between each coat.

Step 10: Finished Table

This image of the finished table does not show it's true beauty because the lighting was bad when it was taken months ago. I also took a picture of a finished section which is closer to what it looks like after applying the first coat of polyurethane.

I completed a dresser top as well but the image displays the kind of look you can achieve by adding a little bit of veining. For that project instead of using a liner brush I used a feather which works well also.

Comments

author
lmjagiello (author)2014-07-25

I tried this before but your table knocks it out of the park!

author
inklayer (author)lmjagiello2014-07-25

Wow, thank you so much! Wish me luck in the "Paint it" contest.

author
jessyratfink (author)2014-07-10

I would have never thought to try this - I love how you can get so much character only out of paint :D

author
inklayer (author)jessyratfink2014-07-10

Using high quality paints with minerals added you can even use similar methods in things such as your kitchen or bathroom counter tops that will withstand the test of time with proper care. The highest quality of water based polyurethane that I have found is made by Benjamin Moore.

b-a.jpg

About This Instructable

3,961views

42favorites

Bio: AKA inklayer on SC! I do not do the farm thing, heart thing, pillow thing etc. Too much junk for my taste! Please use this ... More »
More by inklayer:Watermelon Salad with ChervilFaux Granite Table
Add instructable to: