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Picture of Fig and Speck Pizza
figpizza04.jpg
My mother grew up in an Italian-American family in Brooklyn. Gran Fran, my mother, has for all sorts of recipes, both old and new. Her favorites were passed down from her Nonna (the typical Italian grandma) and her mother. In turn, over the years, she has passed along her considerable collection of recipes and food facts to all of her children and now her grandchildren.

Recently, I asked Gran Fran about the difference between speck and pancetta. She told me speck is more like a black forest ham, cured, whereas pancetta is raw and needs to be cooked. She then shared this Fig and Speck Pizza recipe with me.

There are a lot of ingredients here, but it's a simple process to put the whole thing together. I bought pizza dough since I've never had much luck with making my own. The fun part comes when you spread everything out and grate that final sprinkling of parmesan over the top.

Have fun with this and enjoy your Fall!

recipe courtesy of Fran Claro of The Italian Pantry.

FIg and Speck Pizza

Ingredients:

  • Dough for 1 pizza crust, store-bought or homemade
  • 1 cup whole milk ricotta, well drained
  • 1/2 pound whole-milk mozzarella, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 pound speck, diced
  • 12 figs, halved lengthwise
  • 3 garlic cloves, quartered
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 basil leaves, torn
  • 3 tablespoons Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • Sprinkle coarse salt
  • Sprinkle red pepper flakes
Method:
  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.
  • In the olive oil, saute garlic until golden; set aside oil and garlic.
  • Spread pizza dough in lightly oiled pan.
  • Smooth ricotta over dough; top with mozzarella.
  • Arrange figs in a pinwheel pattern atop mozzarella; sprinkle with speck.
  • Scatter garlic over ingredients; set oil aside.
  • Sprinkle pizza with basil, Parmigiano, salt, and pepper.
  • Drizzle with garlic oil and honey.
  • Bake 18 to 25 minutes, or until crust is golden and cheese is bubbling.
 
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Step 1: What You'll Need

Picture of What You'll Need
Speck is the only non-traditional ingredient in this recipe. You can replace it with prosciutto, bacon or black forest ham. But, if you can find speck, use it, such a nice earthy flavor.

Ingredients:
  • Dough for 1 pizza crust, store-bought or homemade
  • 1 cup whole milk ricotta, well drained1/2 pound whole-milk mozzarella, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 pound speck, sliced
  • 12 figs, halved lengthwise
  • 3 garlic cloves, quartered
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 basil leaves, torn
  • 3 tablespoons Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • Sprinkle coarse salt
  • Sprinkle red pepper flakes

Step 2: Fresh Basil

Picture of Fresh Basil
I know it's the end of the season (well, I'm in California) but if you can find fresh basil, do so. I kept the leaves in between two sheets of damp paper towels and then put them into a zipper storage bag. The leaves kept fresh for a week this way in the fridge.

Step 3: Fresh or Packaged?

Picture of Fresh or Packaged?
figpizza17.jpg
Mozzarella comes fresh, packed in water, or packaged that's a low-moisture type of cheese.

I have a lot of options for fresh mozzarella around here, so that's what I used. The packaged low-moisture kind you get at your local supermarket is just fine here.

If you use the fresh cheese, you may want to drain it in a strainer for a bit to remove the excess liquid.
  • Smooth ricotta over dough; top with mozzarella.

Step 4: Figs and Honey

Picture of Figs and Honey
figpizza15.jpg
The perfect pairing, figs and honey, feature heavily in this recipe. The sweetness of the honey against the tangy ricotta cheese meld together to create a nice mellow flavor.
  • Arrange figs in a pinwheel pattern atop mozzarella; sprinkle with speck.
  • Scatter garlic over ingredients; set oil aside.
  • Sprinkle pizza with basil, Parmigiano, salt, and pepper.
  • Drizzle with garlic oil and honey.

Step 5: Just before the Oven

Picture of Just before the Oven
figpizza19.jpg
Sprinkle the Parmigiano Reggiano over the top of your creation. I have a handheld grater that is just amazing. You can move it around and not disturb any of the other ingredients. And, it creates a really even coating of cheese.
  • Drizzle with garlic oil and honey.
  • Bake 18 to 25 minutes, or until crust is golden and cheese is bubbling.
Grissini3 years ago
Awesome Pizza. Did you cut the stems off the figs? And in a retail setting, whole milk mozz is vastly different than fresh ovoline. Finding Speck is a challenge but definitively worth the hunt. Serrano would be an easy and awesome substitute. Iberico would be beyond baller. Great ible and I can't wait to try this out.
nonreactivepan (author)  Grissini3 years ago
Thanks! I actually didn't cut the stems off of the figs, it never even occurred to me.
Enjoy and if you do make this, please let me know how it turns out!
zazenergy3 years ago
gorgeous photography and great instructable! i wish i had smell-a-vision!
nonreactivepan (author)  zazenergy3 years ago
thank you! maybe we can develop scratch and sniff technology for food photography! :)
icsnerdics3 years ago
Nonna was right. : )
Speck is like prosciutto cotto (cooked), but smoked.
Pancetta is taken from the belly of the pig and it's by far like 50/50 fat and ham, it needs to be cooked and also it's less healty. :D

thought i'm vegetarian, i know my italian shi-! :D

p.s. FIGS ARE AWESOME! really nice recipe!
NOOOOO!
Speck is not like prosciutto cotto (boiled) is flavored with pepper etc. then smoked like bacon and then aged like prosciutto crudo.

And I suggest to put speck on pizza just before eating because cooked speck will be chewy.

Great pizza I'll try it soon!
lol i was sleepy, i mean, it's like prosciutto crudo, not cotto.

insomma, un salume stagionato e affumicato. :D
nonreactivepan (author)  formellini3 years ago
i had no point of reference for speck, so it's great to get everyone's comments.
hope you enjoy the pizza!
nonreactivepan (author)  icsnerdics3 years ago
thanks for the comment and glad you enjoyed the post.
you can easily make this veggie.

and, please check out my mom's blog, where the recipe first appeared:
http://theitalianpantry.com/blog/2010/06/21/covering-a-fig-tree/
katydot3 years ago
Do so love this pizza. Nonreactive Pan strikes again! Wonderful!