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In this video I fixed a faulty Bostitch compressor, which had a broken intake pipe.  The vibrations of the machine must have over time caused so much stressed to the part of the pipe closest to the tank that it simply broke.  So I got a new 10mm anodised aluminium pipe, which seemed to be a higher grade than what I was replacing.  It was challenging to bend the pipe into shape and took a few attempts more than I showed in the video.  The fade transition are where I stitch the process together.  I used a micro pipe bender and pipe cutter, typically plumbers tools to bend my fix as close to the original shape.  I used a conical hss bit to de-burr the inside of the pipe and where I connected the black push-fit valve between the two section, use the pipe cutter to channel a small grove around and about 10mm from the end, for it to catch.  The olives which are the ring shape parts which pinch the pipe when the compression nut is tighten were different on the original in that they had a flat bit on the back.  When I looked at some normal compression nuts I realised the ones on the compressor were identical to the ones used in normal plumbing application, so I decided to use normal olives.  They seem to work fine but this is something someone who knows a bit more about compressors could correct me on.  Since completing the video I have also made a sound dampening box and will be uploading a video next week.
Mine doesn't put out as much pressure as the box says. The filters are clean, and I can get more pressure out of it if I move the dial into the red, but I don't want to risk anything bad happening. Do you have any suggestions? (I think the box values may be the max settings if I redline the pressure gauge values, but I may be wrong)

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