Flat Bottom - Light Bulb Vase

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Introduction: Flat Bottom - Light Bulb Vase

About: Innovative Projects, Diy's, Life Hacks

I am sure you have seen a lot of Light Bulb vases.

I also made one some time ago, but I never used it.

The main reason, I did not like the fact that it needed some kind of stand or support.

Because of the shape, it can't stand on its own.

In this Instructable, I demonstrate a simple technique to make the bottom of the bulb flat-ish.

Step 1:

Remove the contact from the light bulb and then break the black ceramic.

Step 2:

Break off the stem and use the screwdriver to keep hollowing the bulb.

Step 3:

Wash and dry the bulb

Step 4:

Put it in the cold oven and turn up the temperature to the maximum.

Step 5:

Once the bulb is hot, remove it from the oven and jam it somewhere with the bottom facing up.

I used a grill rack.

Step 6:

Use a blow torch to heat the bottom.

Because the glass is so thin, it will sink in.

Now you have a Light Bulb vase than can stand on its own.

Ps.

Make sure to wear safety goggles.

Technically you could skip the oven as the bulb is designed to withstand the temperature change.

It's just an extra step to limit possibilities that the glass could crack.

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24 Comments

I do not want to be looking for trouble that is not there but the gloves must be strong enough to withstand the heated glass and to protect your hands from oozing that painful red stuff!

2 replies

welders gloves, would probably be the best. since you would not want molten glass, or hot glass shards falling on your hands.

welders gloves, would probably be the best. since you would not want molten glass, or hot glass shards falling on your hands.

you can use salt to clean the inside of the bulb

2 replies

would not recommend using anything, but distilled water to clean out the inside of the bulb. unless you, rinse it out thoroughly with distilled water. salt or any other chemicals, can alter the chemical structure of the glass and introduce fracture stress points. and they, cannot be properly annealed, to relieve the stress.

the only thing that should be in the bulb, are pieces that fell in while working on it. so salt is of no advantage, in this type of situation. if all you, are doing is flushing out bits and pieces.

Yes, you can. I personally never use salt to clean bulbs as the water works just fine.

Cheers!

have you tried it slightly on the side will it sink again or become uneven

2 replies

No, I have not tried it.

It will deform, that's for sure, but I don't know the end result will look like.

well if you were to use thermofax high temp insulation board, you would be able to get more consistent and more precise flatness. by pressing the softened glass, on it.

borosilicate glass melts at around 1,508*F and is annealed around 1022*F and has a wide plastic state but not as wide as most glasses.

quartz glass melts around 3029*F and is annealed around 2084*F but it has a much narrower plastic state.

and the presence of a cloudy white coloration, means it has crystalized (gone through devitrification). and needs to be annealed, back to an amorphous solid to relieve the internal stress to prevent being easily damaged.

I MADE A VASE FROM A BULB AND ATTACHED THE BULB IN THE MIDDLE OF THE MIRROR SIDE OF A CD WITH APOKSY CEMENT SO THERE IS REFLECTION OF THE FLOWERS FROM THE CD AS A MIRROR. ALSO THE CD BASE ENABLE MORE STABILITY TO THE BULB VASE.

The oven also ensures that the bulb is dry inside - good idea.

The oven also ensures that the bulb is dry inside - good idea.

The oven also ensures that the bulb is dry inside - good idea.