Introduction: Flowers and Carbon Monoxide

Picture of Flowers and Carbon Monoxide

I wanted to create a fun way to integrate a household decoration and a Carbon Monoxide detector. I didn't want the device to scream like most alarms do, I wanted it to be subtle. This is why I chose to do a flower arrangement and RGB led. Tell me what you guys think and enjoy!

Step 1: Gather Your Tools

Picture of Gather Your Tools

Things You will need:

Arduino

Carbon Monoxide Sensor MQ-7 (ordered off of Amazon)

RGB led's (common anthode)

Soldering Iron/Solder

Bread Board/Solder Board (copper board)

Wire Cutters/Strippers

Small pliers

male wires

1k resistors (at least 2)

*two pinches of patience*

Step 2: Step 2: Testing Your Devices

Picture of Step 2: Testing Your Devices

First you want to test your add ons (RGB led and Carbon Monoxide sensor). Just to make sure they work, because of they don't work you might have to re-order your devices.

Here is the code I used to test my RGB:

#define GREEN 3
#define BLUE 5 #define RED 6 #define delayTime 20

void setup() {

pinMode(GREEN, OUTPUT); pinMode(BLUE, OUTPUT); pinMode(RED, OUTPUT); digitalWrite(GREEN, HIGH); digitalWrite(BLUE, HIGH); digitalWrite(RED, HIGH); }

int redVal; int blueVal; int greenVal; void loop() { int redVal = 255; int blueVal = 0; int greenVal = 0; for( int i = 0 ; i < 255 ; i += 1 ){ greenVal += 1; redVal -= 1; analogWrite( GREEN, 255 - greenVal ); analogWrite( RED, 255 - redVal );

delay( delayTime ); } redVal = 0; blueVal = 0; greenVal = 255; for( int i = 0 ; i < 255 ; i += 1 ){ blueVal += 1; greenVal -= 1; analogWrite( BLUE, 255 - blueVal ); analogWrite( GREEN, 255 - greenVal );

delay( delayTime ); } redVal = 0; blueVal = 255; greenVal = 0; for( int i = 0 ; i < 255 ; i += 1 ){ redVal += 1; blueVal -= 1; analogWrite( RED, 255 - redVal ); analogWrite( BLUE, 255 - blueVal );

delay( delayTime ); } }

Here is the code I used to test my sensor:

// Digital pin 8 will be called 'pin8'
int pin8 = 8; // Analog pin 0 will be called 'sensor' int sensor = A0; // Set the initial sensorValue to 0 int sensorValue = 0;

// The setup routine runs once when you press reset void setup() { // Initialize the digital pin 8 as an output pinMode(pin8, OUTPUT); // Initialize serial communication at 9600 bits per second Serial.begin(9600); }

// The loop routine runs over and over again forever void loop() { // Read the input on analog pin 0 (named 'sensor') sensorValue = analogRead(sensor); // Print out the value you read Serial.println(sensorValue, DEC); // If sensorValue is greater than 500 if (sensorValue > 500) { // Activate digital output pin 8 - the LED will light up digitalWrite(pin8, HIGH); } else { // Deactivate digital output pin 8 - the LED will not light up digitalWrite(pin8, LOW); }

}

Step 3: Step 3: Code

#define BLUE 5

#define RED 6 #define delayTime 20 int redVal; int blueVal;

// Analog pin 0 will be called 'sensor' int sensor = A0; // Set the initial sensorValue to 0 int sensorValue = 0; // The setup routine runs once when you press reset void setup() { pinMode(BLUE, OUTPUT); pinMode(RED, OUTPUT); digitalWrite(BLUE, LOW); digitalWrite(RED, LOW);

// Initialize serial communication at 9600 bits per second Serial.begin(9600); }

// The loop routine runs over and over again forever void loop() { // Read the input on analog pin 0 (named 'sensor') sensorValue = analogRead(sensor); // Print out the value you read Serial.println(sensorValue, DEC); // If sensorValue is greater than 500 // if (sensorValue <= 220) { // digitalWrite(BLUE, LOW); // } // else { // // Deactivate digital output pin 8 - the LED will not light up // digitalWrite(BLUE, HIGH); // if (sensorValue >= 220) { // digitalWrite(RED, LOW); // } // else { // // Deactivate digital output pin 8 - the LED will not light up // digitalWrite(RED, HIGH); // } // }

redVal =255-map(sensorValue,200,250, 0,255); blueVal =map(sensorValue,200,250,0,255);

analogWrite(BLUE, blueVal); analogWrite(RED, redVal); }

Step 4: Step 4: Solder Time

After you have tested and you are sure your set-up of the Arduino works it is time to solder your device together.

It should look something like this (depending on how you set up your copper board):

*pictures coming soon I promise*

Step 5: What Is the Code Saying?

Basically the code is talking to the Arduino board and telling the sensor when it detects Carbon Monoxide change color. In my case I used a RGB led and I only used the red and blue legs. So when the levels reach the number calibrated on my sensor the LED will turn red and when the levels are "normal" the light will turn blue. If there is a little Monoxide catching the sensor the LED will turn a purplish, pink color.

Step 6: Step 5: Make It Cool

Picture of Step 5: Make It Cool

Last step is to put your finished working sensor into something cool. It can be whatever form you like just be careful to not cover your sensor too much or it wont be able to read Carbon Monoxide. I choose to make mine look like a bouquet of flowers, that someone could easily decorate there homes with. It doesn't matter what it is as long as the sensor does its job. Let's get creative!

Comments

DIY-Guy (author)2015-04-30

Thanks for the pretty pictures, it's an artistic idea!

I like the idea of redoing an alarm indicator- for something less lethal than CO.
If my family is going to die from something while we sleep, we want a loud and clear alarm.

But for humidity, or left a door unlocked, or something like a slow water leak this would be a good fit for us. Thank you for documenting your work. :)

wemja (author)2015-04-30

First of all I must say that it turned out very nice. Its a creative way to hide an indicator light.
If it was just an oxygen meter or dust meter this would be awesome but you may need something more direct when working with something as dangerous as CO.

The problem with CO is that most sensors are really slow in picking it up. You only have a short time in between the sensor picking up the CO and passing out from it so a really noisy thing is advised.

Is it fair to assume that I can use the method you listed here to use in combination with an optical dust sensor to have an particle emission indicator ?

annieoakley (author)2015-04-29

In the middle of the night when there's CO leak and everyone's lives are on the line, you just want the LED to change colors?

I'd prefer to be inconvenienced by that annoying screaming alarm, but that's just me! :)

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