Introduction: Fly-fishing Tying

Picture of Fly-fishing Tying

This Instructables page will show you how to make simple dry and wet flies for general use (i.e. usable for general and not for targeted fishing). Along with the Instructions there will be descriptions of ideal areas to use the flies, and a short description of how to go about attracting fish with each cast.


WARNING: Be careful when handing hooks are they can easily injure yourself, especially if you do not have any tools to keep the hook steady.

Step 1: Materials

Picture of Materials

General Materials:

  • Some form of clamps, be it pliers or a dedicated stand for fly hooks.
  • Thread; sewing thread or any thread that wont fall apart with use is sufficient. The tool shown in the image with the thread is called a thread bobbin, although not necessary it makes holding the thread tightly and manipulating significantly easier.

you can find most if not all of the materials for any fly tying project at any fishing store near you with a fly fishing section

Wet Flies:Used to fish under the waters surface, ideal in deeper pools of slow or stagnant water.

For the Wooly bugger fly

  • You will need a small sized hook between size 8-16, marabou hair(Tail), Chenille, and a feather(Hackle).
  • Go to step 2

Dry Flies:Used to fish on the waters surface, ideal for shallower areas or fast moving currents.

For the Adams Parachute fly

  • You will need a small sized hook between size 8-16, Colored dubbing(a cotton like bundle of threads), marabou hair (Tail), and a feather (Hackle).
  • Go to step 7

Step 2: Wooly Bugger: Ribbing the Fly

Picture of Wooly Bugger: Ribbing the Fly

The first step of any fly tying you need to take thread and rib the fly.

Ribbing refers to taking thread and wrapping it around the fly in order to anchor the materials you will put onto the fly, this will prevent the fly from falling apart after a single use.

  1. To start take a length of thread and hold it along the length of the hook's shaft.
  2. Starting at the head of the hook start wrapping the thread around the hook in either direction as long as you maintain each loop being flush with the previous.

Step 3: Wooly Bugger: Adding the Tail

Picture of Wooly Bugger: Adding the Tail

    Cut off several strips of marabou hair and hold then flush together.

    1. Using the ribbing thread from the previous step wrap around the midpoint of the bundle of hair mid way down the hooks shaft. (make sure to wrap it tight so that the hair will not slide or move.)
    2. Wrap the thread towards the base of the hook to anchor the hair tighter but make sure that the tail extends outwards unaffected by the binding.
    3. Cut off excess hair towards the top of the hook.

    Step 4: Wooly Bugger: Adding the Body

    Picture of Wooly Bugger: Adding the Body
    1. For the body use the Chenille (a string that appears slightly fuzzy) start by holding the chenille flush to the body of the hook and wrap the ribbing around it toward the 'Tail' added in the previous step. (The ribbing strand does not have to be flush in this step but does need to be tightly bound to prevent moving)
    2. Taking the Chenille wrap it around the hook toward the head of the hook making it flush with each wrap.
    3. Using the ribbing thread anchor the end of the Chenille strand to the hook and cut the excess Chenille off.

    Step 5: Wooly Bugger: Adding the Hackle

    Picture of Wooly Bugger: Adding the Hackle

    Hackle is a decorative piece (typically a feather) added to the fly to attract attention either by changing how it moves in the water or adding a contrast of color.

    1. Taking the feather in your hand separate the fibers from one another so that the feather looks frayed.
    2. Take the ribbing thread and anchor one end of the feather around the hook's shaft and wrap the thread sparsely towards the 'Tail' stopping at the end of the 'Body'.
    3. Take the feather and wrap it around the body of the hook in a sparse manner facing the feathers fibers outwards.
    4. Using the ribbing thread wrap back towards the head of the hook without wrapping down the feather's fibers.

    Step 6: Wooly Bugger: Tying Off the Fly

    Picture of Wooly Bugger: Tying Off the Fly

    Tying off the fly prevents the parts from falling off due to the ribbing becoming loose, simply put it holds the fly together. How you choose to do it depends on your preference, you can tie a simple knot, glue it down or cement it. For ease of use this method just ends with tying a knot, quite literally any knot works as long as it is secure, stable and is resistant to falling apart.

    1. If your ribbing thread isn't already wrap it around the hook towards the head of the hook.
    2. Tie your choice of knot around the end, preferably I choose to go with a simple double knot.

    The wooly bugger fly is a wet fly designed to imitate insects, or small fish that would be easy prey for most game fish. Although the best areas for easy Wooly Bugger depends on the color scheme or design the one shown in the image is best used in areas with a lot of light due to the dark body. One thing to be careful of is that the fly is heavier than some so it will sink to get into deeper parts of your fishing area, the benefits is that it gets closer to fish the constants however is that it is much more likely to get caught on rocks.

    Step 7: Adams Parachute: Ribbing the Fly

    Picture of Adams Parachute: Ribbing the Fly

    The first step of any fly tying you need to take thread and rib the fly.

    Ribbing refers to taking thread and wrapping it around the fly in order to anchor the materials you will put onto the fly, this will prevent the fly from falling apart after a single use.

    1. To start take a length of thread and hold it along the length of the hook's shaft.
    2. Starting at the head of the hook start wrapping the thread around the hook in either direction as long as you maintain each loop being flush with the previous.

    Step 8: Adams Parachute: Adding the Tail

    Picture of Adams Parachute: Adding the Tail
    1. Cut off several strips of marabou hair and hold then flush together.
    2. Using the ribbing thread from the previous step wrap around the midpoint of the bundle of hair mid way down the hooks shaft. (make sure to wrap it tight so that the hair will not slide or move.)
    3. Wrap the thread towards the base of the hook to anchor the hair tighter but make sure that the tail extends outwards unaffected by the binding.
    4. Cut off excess hair towards the top of the hook.

    Step 9: Adams Parachute: Adding the Body(Part 1)

    Picture of Adams Parachute: Adding the Body(Part 1)

    For the Adams parachute it has a 'top knot' as some people refer to it. Using a length of material it sticks it straight upwards. The material this is made from is dependent on the maker, it can be anything that will mostly retain its shape when wet, fibers from string work well.

    1. Taking you material of choice anchor it roughly midway down the hook with the ribbing thread.
    2. Pull both ends of the material pull it straight up and wrap the ribbing thread around the bend in the material formed.
    3. Re-wrap the ribbing thread around the hook's shaft but not too tightly that the 'top knot' is bent at an angle it should extend almost if not straight upward.

    Step 10: Adams Parachute: Adding the Body(Part 2)

    Picture of Adams Parachute: Adding the Body(Part 2)

    For dubbing you apply it by taking out a clump and twisting it between your fingers around the ribbing thread thus 'dubbing' the thread the color and texture of the applied material.

    1. Take out a clump of dubbing from your supply and apply it onto the ribbing thread.
      (in case you have trouble with this step simply wet your fingers slightly to make it wants to adhere more)
    2. Wrap the dubbed thread around the hooks shaft starting at the 'tail' to the head of the hook and back to the 'top knot' of the fly.

    Step 11: Adams Parachute: Adding the Hackle

    Picture of Adams Parachute: Adding the Hackle

    Hackle is a decorative piece (typically a feather) added to the fly to attract attention either by changing how it moves in the water or adding a contrast of color.

    1. Taking your feather separate the fibers of the feather until it begins to look frayed.
    2. Wrap the end of the feather with the ribbing thread to anchor it to the base of the 'top knot'.
    3. Taking the feather wrap it horizontally around the section of the 'top knot' that was previously wrapped by the ribbing thread so that the feather's fibers extend outwards in 360 degrees spread.

    Step 12: Adams Parachute: Tying Off the Fly

    Picture of Adams Parachute: Tying Off the Fly

    Tying off the fly prevents the parts from falling off due to the ribbing becoming loose, simply put it holds the fly together. How you choose to do it depends on your preference, you can tie a simple knot, glue it down or cement it. For ease of use this method just ends with tying a knot, quite literally any knot works as long as it is secure, stable and is resistant to falling apart.

    1. If it isn't already wrap the ribbing thread towards the head of the hook.
    2. Tie your choice of knot around the end, preferably I choose to go with a simple double knot.

    The Adams parachute fly is a dry fly that is designed to resemble an adult mayfly, and uses two colors with a dark hackle and lightly colored 'topknot' to remain visible in most fishing conditions. The fly is used by attracting attention near the surface of the water so its best in shallow or slow moving areas where it stands out, or if you're worried about getting it caught on a rock or aquatic plants.

    Comments

    DIY Hacks and How Tos (author)2017-10-27

    Interesting. I was always curious about how flies were made, but I had never looked it up. It seems like this could be a fun hobby.

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